video

How to set up tubeless tyres – video

Tubeless tyres are a great way to avoid punctures, lose weight and improve performance. You will need to make sure your tyres are tubeless-ready or tubeless-compatible before you start.

The wheels we use in the video below are tubeless-ready, but most mountain bike wheels can be converted using a conversion kit.

Tools for the job

  • Tubeless sealant
  • Tyre lever
  • Track pump or compressor

How to set up tubeless tyres

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: How to set up tubeless tyres

This video is part of?the Park Tool Maintenance Monday series. You can purchase the Park Tools used in the video at a number of dealers across the UK and internationally. For more maintenance videos, subscribe to the BikeRadar YouTube channel.

You may also like: Tips for setting up tubeless mountain bike tyres








How to set up tubeless tyres – video

Tubeless tyres are a great way to avoid punctures, lose weight and improve performance. You will need to make sure your tyres are tubeless-ready or tubeless-compatible before you start.

The wheels we use in the video below are tubeless-ready, but most mountain bike wheels can be converted using a conversion kit.

Tools for the job

  • Tubeless sealant
  • Tyre lever
  • Track pump or compressor

How to set up tubeless tyres

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: How to set up tubeless tyres

This video is part of?the Park Tool Maintenance Monday series. You can purchase the Park Tools used in the video at a number of dealers across the UK and internationally. For more maintenance videos, subscribe to the BikeRadar YouTube channel.

You may also like: Tips for setting up tubeless mountain bike tyres








Danny MacAskill’s The Ridge video

Danny MacAskill has returned to his homeland of the Isle of Skye for his latest video, with the fearless rider taking on “a death-defying ride along the notorious Cuillin Ridgeline” – a path never ridden before on?a full suspension mountain bike.

The film was been created by Stu Thomson and his team at Cut Media, with support from sponsors Five Ten and Enve, and features stunning aerial photography. Thomson said:?“It was certainly one of the most demanding locations we’ve ever filmed, but a rewarding one at the same time.?Danny and I are very proud of being from Scotland so it was great to be able to show off the amazing landscape along with Danny’s incredible riding.”

In the video MacAskill provides his trademark technical skills and edge-of-your-seat stunts against this imposing and beautiful backdrop. He said: “Ever since I was a kid growing up on Skye I have always dreamt about riding a bike up on the Cuillin ridge! The project took a lot of planning and was probably one of the most physically demanding films I have ever worked on! It was definitely a labour of love though as I wanted to show off the island for how it is and make everyone who lives there proud to be from this amazing part of the world.”

Check out Danny MacAskill’s The Ridge below.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: Danny MacAskill’s The Ridge

Surely one of the world's most beautiful locations for a nose manual:

Danny Mac explores th estunning Isle of Skye landscape

This isn't an out-take, just wait til you see it!:

This isn’t an outtake








How to set up a suspension fork – video

Most suspension forks will have a set of dials that allow you to adjust how they work.

Getting these settings correct is essential to maintaining your fork’s performance and ensuring you have the most comfortable ride possible.

Suspension fork controls

There are three main controls you’ll see on mountain bike suspension: preload, rebound, and compression, which is sometimes split into low-speed and high-speed compression on high-end forks.

Preload

Preload is the resistance the fork gives against your weight. So the heavier you are, the more preload you’ll need. For a fork with a coil spring, this would equate to having a stiffer spring, but for an air fork it’s simply a case of pumping in more pressure. ?

Compression damping

Compression damping comes from the internals of the fork and works by regulating the flow of oil through small holes. Compression damping only affects the fork when it is compressing – this doesn’t affect the preload but can appear to have a similar effect on the fork.

The more compression damping you dial in (+) the slower the fork will move through its travel – this is good if you want a bike to pedal without bobbing for instance, but the negative effect will be the limitation of the fork’s movement when you hit a bump, making it feel a bit like it’s locked out. In fact a fork’s lockout is simply an extremely high amount of compression damping.

Rebound damping

Rebound damping is a similar internal system to compression and only affects the fork when it is returning to its natural position after an impact.

The more rebound damping you dial in (+) the slower the fork will return to its natural position after an impact. A slower return, or more rebound compression is required if the bike feels as though it’s trying to buck you off, especially after corners or when you land a jump – but if repeated hits are causing the fork to feel like it’s ‘packing down’ and not returning to it’s natural position, you’ll need less damping.

CTD/lockout

Your suspension might feature settings that are designed to give it a different ride characteristic. Lockout is the most common of these, and when activated it will use the compression damping system to effectively stop the fork from working. Lockout is useful when you encounter prolonged climbs.

CTD (climb, trail, descend) is a slightly more advanced form of lockout that gives a ‘tune’ that’s better suited to the type of terrain you are riding on. CTD is a Fox term, but other manufactures have similar systems.

A climb mode would pretty much act as a lockout, although typically will allow more movement; trail or ride mode is a slightly stiffened setting to allow movement, but with some resistance in order to give a good pedaling platform with a stiffer compression setting; descent means the suspension is fully active and would offer little compression damping during use.

How to adjust a suspension fork

In the video below, BikeRadar’s James Tennant shows you how to set up and tune your front suspension. Knowing how to get air into your fork and exactly how much you need is vital.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: How to set up a suspension fork.

This video is part of?the Park Tool Maintenance Monday series. You can purchase the Park Tools used in the video at a number of?dealers?across the UK and internationally. For more maintenance videos, subscribe to the?BikeRadar YouTube?channel.

Tools for the job

  • Shock pump
  • Ruler
  • Full set of riding gear

It’s important to have your full riding kit to hand – as the weight of what you wear will need to be factored into the ‘rider weight’ and the suspension sag will need to be set accordingly. So it might be a good idea to make adjustments just before you ride, and take the shock pump with you so you can make further adjustments.

Set preload sag

It’s a good idea to have someone to help, but it’s possible to set sag yourself by leaning against a wall or solid object. ?

Start by measuring the stanchion of the fork, the shiny bit that moves inside the larger leg. Divide that length by four to calculate a 25 percent sag distance. Some more aggressive forks, such as those found on downhill bikes, can be set with up to 30 percent sag, but if you’re not sure, use 25 percent.

Get on the bike and assume the riding position. Most forks will have a small rubber ring on one of the legs which will allow you to see the amount of sag – if yours hasn’t, you can tie a rubber band around the leg.

Don’t be tempted to use a cable tie and don’t leave the rubber on the stanchion, as the it collects dirt, which can damage the stanchion.

Get on the bike and try not to bounce it as you mount it – you’re looking for a standing weight. Slowly get off the bike and measure the amount of sag.

Adjust the air pressure or preload dial and try again until the desired 25 percent is achieved. If you have an air fork, take it up or down by 10psi at a time, or for coil forks, a full turn at a time should give the right increments.

It’s worth noting that for coil-sprung forks, you might need a heavier or lighter spring depending on your weight – these should be available from any good bike shop.

Compression and rebound

Start by working out how many ‘clicks’ of adjustment you have with the compression and rebound – to do this, wind the dial in clockwise, then wind it back out. As you wind it out, count the clicks.

If you aren’t sure what you need, or have a new fork set the dials to the middle. You can then experiment by one or two clicks at a time until the desired setup is achieved.

Different trails and terrain will have difference setup requirements. So it’s a good idea to get a feel for what the dials are actually doing in terms of suspension action, so you can fine tune to your own preference.

Also, be aware that it’s quite rare that taking either compression or rebound to the extremes will have much benefit, so as a rule of thumb it’s usually better to stay near the centre of the available range.


How to replace a crankset

If you have bent a crank or just want to upgrade your crankset, knowing how to replace it yourself can be pretty useful.

In the video below we demonstrate the procedure using a Shimano Hollowtech crankset – but the procedure is the same for FSA MegaExo and other similar systems. Similarly, a Hollowtech-type crankset on a mountain bike will be the same as a Hollowtech-type crankset on a road bike.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: How to replace a crankset

This video is part of?the Park Tool Maintenance Monday series. You can purchase the Park Tools used in the video at a number of dealers across the UK and internationally. For more maintenance videos, subscribe to the BikeRadar YouTube channel.

Tools for the job

  • Torque wrench
  • Hex keys
  • Bottom bracket removal tool
  • Rubber mallet

How to replace a crankset

Before you start, make sure the crankset you want to fit is compatible with the bottom bracket you have. It’s advisable to do this at the point of purchase, because different bottom brackets and cranksets aren’t compatible.

Check what type of bottom bracket system you have before attempting this job: check what type of bottom bracket system you have before attempting this job

Check what type of bottom bracket system you have and make sure the crankset is compatible

1. Remove the cranks

Undo the pinch bolts from the left crank using a hex key. Remove the plastic preload cap from the left-hand crank with the plastic part of the bottom bracket removal tool.?

Remove the plastic preload cap from the left-hand crank with the plastic part of the bottom bracket removal tool:

Remove the plastic preload cap

You should now be able to remove the crank from the axle.

Partially tap out the axle and right-hand crank from the bottom bracket with the palm of your hand – you can use a rubber mallet if it’s seized.

Remove the chain from the chainring, and carefully rest it on the bearing cup. Fully remove the driveside crank and chainrings.

2. Fit the new crank

Insert the driveside crank through the bottom bracket, passing it through the chain first.?

Insert the driveside crank through the bottom bracket, passing it through the chain first:

Hold the frame and give the crank a tap with your palm – don’t use a hammer, it’s not needed and will stress the bearings. Return the non-driveside crank to the axle.

Return the plastic preload cap to the thread and wind in by hand, finishing off with the bottom bracket tool. This should now have taken out the slack between the cranks and they should be firmly in place.

Finally, tighten and torque bolts on the crank. These need to be tightened as a pair, so wind one until it becomes tight, then repeat with the other. If you have a torque tool, tighten to 10Nm both sides, then 12, 14, and so on, until you reach the stated torque.

Your bike should now be ready to test ride in a safe car-free area.


How to replace a crankset – video

If you have bent a crank or just want to upgrade your crankset, knowing how to replace it yourself can be pretty useful.

In the video below we demonstrate the procedure using a Shimano Hollowtech crankset – but the procedure is the same for FSA MegaExo and other similar systems. Similarly, a Hollowtech-type crankset on a mountain bike will be the same as a Hollowtech-type crankset on a road bike.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: How to replace a crankset

This video is part of?the Park Tool Maintenance Monday series. You can purchase the Park Tools used in the video at a number of dealers across the UK and internationally. For more maintenance videos, subscribe to the BikeRadar YouTube channel.

Tools for the job

  • Torque wrench
  • Hex keys
  • Bottom bracket removal tool
  • Rubber mallet

How to replace a crankset

Before you start, make sure the crankset you want to fit is compatible with the bottom bracket you have. It’s advisable to do this at the point of purchase, because different bottom brackets and cranksets aren’t compatible.

Check what type of bottom bracket system you have before attempting this job: check what type of bottom bracket system you have before attempting this job

Check what type of bottom bracket system you have and make sure the crankset is compatible

1. Remove the cranks

Undo the pinch bolts from the left crank using a hex key. Remove the plastic preload cap from the left-hand crank with the plastic part of the bottom bracket removal tool.?

Remove the plastic preload cap from the left-hand crank with the plastic part of the bottom bracket removal tool:

Remove the plastic preload cap

You should now be able to remove the crank from the axle.

Partially tap out the axle and right-hand crank from the bottom bracket with the palm of your hand – you can use a rubber mallet if it’s seized.

Remove the chain from the chainring, and carefully rest it on the bearing cup. Fully remove the driveside crank and chainrings.

2. Fit the new crank

Insert the driveside crank through the bottom bracket, passing it through the chain first.?

Insert the driveside crank through the bottom bracket, passing it through the chain first:

Hold the frame and give the crank a tap with your palm – don’t use a hammer, it’s not needed and will stress the bearings. Return the non-driveside crank to the axle.

Return the plastic preload cap to the thread and wind in by hand, finishing off with the bottom bracket tool. This should now have taken out the slack between the cranks and they should be firmly in place.

Finally, tighten and torque bolts on the crank. These need to be tightened as a pair, so wind one until it becomes tight, then repeat with the other. If you have a torque tool, tighten to 10Nm both sides, then 12, 14, and so on, until you reach the stated torque.

Your bike should now be ready to test ride in a safe car-free area.


How to jump a mountain bike

Jumping isn’t just for adrenaline junkies – it’s a fundamental skill that every mountain biker can and should learn. And it’s not that difficult once you’ve got the hang of the techniques involved.

In the video below, MTB skills coach Sam from Pedal Progression shows you how it should be done:

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: how to jump

Step-by-step guide to jumping

Jumping is all about exerting pressure and your ability to control the timing of this pressure through each wheel.

First you need to make sure your pumping is up to scratch. Being able to generate speed without pedaling, by snapping your arms, legs and feet from bent to straight, is crucial to understanding how a bike gets airborne.??

The take-off

Find a jump that you’re comfortable with, roll in at a comfortable speed, out of the saddle. Keep your weight central, over both wheels, and lower your chest. Start to compress, and feel the force of the lip against your tyres.

Compress into the lip:

Treat each wheel as separate – deal with the front then the back – not both together. Slowly start to transfer your weight from your hands to your feet – the idea is that by the time the front wheel reaches the lip, there’s no weight pushing through it.

Transfer your weight from your hands to your feet, so that there's no weight pushing through the front wheel by the time it reaches the:

Pressing down and then releasing your weight through each wheel when jumping is the same as when you bunnyhop. In this case, the lip of a jump will provide all the lift your wheel will need to follow the trajectory of the jump. This means that jumping is a less explosive movement than a bunnyhop – the idea is to keep your head and core following a smooth arc by using your elbows, knees and ankles do the pushing.

x:

Weight transfer timings

The point at which you transfer your weight from your hands to your feet is very important. Imagine a line just past halfway up the lip of the jump – this is the point at which you need to change from pushing with your arms to pushing fully from your feet.

Imagine a line about halfway up the jump:

If you’re still pushing into the lip through your arms when you get to this line, you’ll end up getting bucked forwards and over the bars.

As the jumps get bigger or your bike’s suspension increases – this line moves further back.

The landing

Once you’re in the air, you can relax – the hardest part is done. Spot your landing and use your arms and legs to absorb the impact.

Use your arms and legs to absorb the impact:

Try to land both wheels at the same time. Touching down rear wheel first can cause the front to wash out, and steep front wheel landings could end up with you going over the bars.?

Try to land the front and rear wheels at the same time:

Then all you need to worry about on landing is staying off the brakes.

Jumping tips

  • Start by learning on a tabletop jump, rather than a double, because you’ll have a flat, safe area to land on if you mess up. Don’t go too big too soon.
  • If you’re struggling to jump using SPD pedals, try fitting some flats.
  • Play around with your timings too, to find what works best for you.


By admin on September 18, 2014 | Mountain Bikes
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mountain bike skills: how to jump

Jumping isn’t just for adrenaline junkies – it’s a fundamental skill that every mountain biker can and should learn. And it’s not that difficult once you’ve got the hang of the techniques involved.

In the video below, MTB skills coach Sam from Pedal Progression shows you how it should be done:

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: how to jump

Step-by-step guide to jumping

Jumping is all about exerting pressure and your ability to control the timing of this pressure through each wheel.

First you need to make sure your pumping is up to scratch. Being able to generate speed without pedaling, by snapping your arms, legs and feet from bent to straight, is crucial to understanding how a bike gets airborne.??

The take-off

Find a jump that you’re comfortable with, roll in at a comfortable speed, out of the saddle. Keep your weight central, over both wheels, and lower your chest. Start to compress, and feel the force of the lip against your tyres.

Compress into the lip:

Treat each wheel as separate – deal with the front then the back – not both together. Slowly start to transfer your weight from your hands to your feet – the idea is that by the time the front wheel reaches the lip, there’s no weight pushing through it.

Transfer your weight from your hands to your feet, so that there's no weight pushing through the front wheel by the time it reaches the:

Pressing down and then releasing your weight through each wheel when jumping is the same as when you bunnyhop. In this case, the lip of a jump will provide all the lift your wheel will need to follow the trajectory of the jump. This means that jumping is a less explosive movement than a bunnyhop – the idea is to keep your head and core following a smooth arc by using your elbows, knees and ankles do the pushing.

x:

Weight transfer timings

The point at which you transfer your weight from your hands to your feet is very important. Imagine a line just past halfway up the lip of the jump – this is the point at which you need to change from pushing with your arms to pushing fully from your feet.

Imagine a line about halfway up the jump:

If you’re still pushing into the lip through your arms when you get to this line, you’ll end up getting bucked forwards and over the bars.

As the jumps get bigger or your bike’s suspension increases – this line moves further back.

The landing

Once you’re in the air, you can relax – the hardest part is done. Spot your landing and use your arms and legs to absorb the impact.

Use your arms and legs to absorb the impact:

Try to land both wheels at the same time. Touching down rear wheel first can cause the front to wash out, and steep front wheel landings could end up with you going over the bars.?

Try to land the front and rear wheels at the same time:

Then all you need to worry about on landing is staying off the brakes.

Jumping tips

  • Start by learning on a tabletop jump, rather than a double, because you’ll have a flat, safe area to land on if you mess up. Don’t go too big too soon.
  • If you’re struggling to jump using SPD pedals, try fitting some flats.
  • Play around with your timings too, to find what works best for you.








High-end road race bikes from Bottecchia

Bottecchia has more than 70 bike models in its 2015 range, and talked BikeRadar through three of the highlights at Eurobike 2014.

The big news for 2015 is the Emme3Gara, a professional carbon disc-equipped race bike that’s set to cost between €5,000 and 10,000.

There’s also the T1 Tourmalet, an aerodynamic frame that’s new for 2015, to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the first Italian Tour de France winner, and the Zoncolan carbon mountain bike, with Shimano XTR and a RockShox RS1 fork. See all three in the video below:

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: Bottecchia 2015 Emme3 Gara, T1 Tourmalet and Zoncolan

Emme3Gara spec details

  • Frame: DDA 3K carbon-banded handmade, alu CNC dropout, direct-mount double pivot brakes
  • Bottom bracket: Press fit 86 (BB30/BSA on demand)
  • Head tube: 1 1/8in integrated up and 1 1/2 down
  • Fork: Monocoque carbon 3k super light, tapered steerer (1 1/2in), 360g
  • Colours: c09 matt carbon
  • Weight: 895g (size medium)

T1 Tourmalet spec details

  • Frame: Monocoque carbon Aero UD, aero seatpost, carbon dropouts
  • Brakes: direct-mount double pivot,
  • Bottom Bracket: Pressfit 86
  • Head tube: 1 1/8in integrated up and 1 1/2in down
  • Fork: Monocoque carbon super light, tapered steerer 1 1/2in, 390g
  • Colours: c68 matt carbon red, c76 matt yellow carbon
  • Weight: 1,080g (size medium)
  • Sizes: 44, 48, 51, 54, 57

Zoncolan 29 spec details

  • Frame: Monocoque carbon UD HM 29 with 12 mm thru-axle
  • Bottom bracket: BB30, 68 mm
  • Head tube: Integrated, 1 1/8in up, 1 1/2in down
  • Colours c29 ,att black, fluro red
  • Weight: 1,190g (size medium)
  • Sizes: 44, 48, 53








BMC 2015 mountain bike range highlights – sponsored video

BMC’s 2015 mountain bike range was on show at Eurobike, including the all-new Speedfox SF range. Designed as a do it all full-sus, the Speedfox is a 29er with a low BB for stability, short chainstays, a long top tube and a slack head angle. The bike features 130mm of suspension thanks to BMC’s APS system, which is designed to maintain traction, control and comfort. BMC say the bike is about balancing everything into a fun package.?

We also checked out Julien Absalon’s World Cup winning Fourstroke FS01, which also features APS suspension but here it’s tuned to retain more of the rider’s power than the Speedfox while still giving comfort.

The Trailfox 29er comes from feedback from BMC’s enduro racing team. The bike’s all about speed and control, featuring a super low bottom bracket, short chainstays, roomy top tube and super slack head angle, BMC call it their race-ready machine.

Check out the 2015 BMC mountain bike range in the video below and view all our videos at the?BikeRadar YouTube page.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: BMC 2015 mountain bike range highlights