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BMC 2015 mountain bike range highlights – sponsored video

BMC’s 2015 mountain bike range was on show at Eurobike, including the all-new Speedfox SF range. Designed as a do it all full-sus, the Speedfox is a 29er with a low BB for stability, short chainstays, a long top tube and a slack head angle. The bike features 130mm of suspension thanks to BMC’s APS system, which is designed to maintain traction, control and comfort. BMC say the bike is about balancing everything into a fun package.?

We also checked out Julien Absalon’s World Cup winning Fourstroke FS01, which also features APS suspension but here it’s tuned to retain more of the rider’s power than the Speedfox while still giving comfort.

The Trailfox 29er comes from feedback from BMC’s enduro racing team. The bike’s all about speed and control, featuring a super low bottom bracket, short chainstays, roomy top tube and super slack head angle, BMC call it their race-ready machine.

Check out the 2015 BMC mountain bike range in the video below and view all our videos at the?BikeRadar YouTube page.

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Video: BMC 2015 mountain bike range highlights


Cube 2015 range highlights – video

Cube’s 2015 range is headlined by the company’s new C68 carbon, which uses a 68:32 carbon to resin ratio compared to the standard 60:40 split, achieved by changing the lay-up of the fibres to create a lighter frame.

This new material can be seen on the top of the range Stereo 140 C68 SLT full-sus 650b mountain bike as well as across the top four models in the company’s pro-level Litening road bike range.

On the budget side of things, Cube has launched a full Shimano Claris-equipped version of its aluminium Peloton road machine as well as updating its women’s and kid’s ranges, which now includes the 24-inch wheeled, air suspension and disc-brake specced Kid 240 SL.

Check out the full Cube 2015 range in the video below and view all our videos at the BikeRadar YouTube page.

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Cube 2015 range highlights – video

Cube’s 2015 range is headlined by the company’s new C68 carbon, which uses a 68:32 carbon to resin ratio compared to the standard 60:40 split, achieved by changing the lay-up of the fibres to create a lighter frame.

This new material can be seen on the top of the range Stereo 140 C68 SLT full-sus 650b mountain bike as well as across the top four models in the company’s pro-level Litening road bike range.

On the budget side of things, Cube has launched a full Shimano Claris-equipped version of its aluminium Peloton road machine as well as updating its women’s and kid’s ranges, which now includes the 24-inch wheeled, air suspension and disc-brake specced Kid 240 SL.

Check out the full Cube 2015 range in the video below and view all our videos at the BikeRadar YouTube page.

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Soho bikes to host adventure evening

Fancy an excuse for a beer and to watch some great mountain bike movies on top destinations?

Next Wednesday (13 August), London’s Soho Bikes will be hosting an evening with Phil Shucksmith from Pro Ride Guides. Phil will be talking about enduro and adventure mountain biking and showing a preview from Pro Ride Guides’ new video series, from 7.30pm.

He will also be answering questions on everything from trail side skills, bike setup and where to find your own next big adventure, to help give you the information you need to get out there and ride.

Over the last six months, Phil and the team have been travelling around Europe, racing, and documenting destinations including Verbier, Punta Ala and La Thuile. They’ve also been working with Mountain Biking UK magazine on some great upcoming features about putting your own adventures together. Get a little taster in the video below:

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Video: Pro Ride Guides in Punta Ala

Soho Bikes is the new London bike store and coffee shop, run by MTB commentator and ex-World Cup racer Rob Warner and some of his close friends.

Soho bikes will be hosting an evening with pro ride guides on 13 august:








MTB tips – body position

The attack position is fundamental aspect of mountain biking. So getting it right will reward the rider with a more comfortable and controlled ride. Get it wrong and you run the risk a chiropractor visit or maybe even a free ride in an air ambulance.

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In the video, Sam from Bristol based skills coaching company Pedal Progression talks you through the correct body position.

A good position takes the weight off your hands, meaning there is less tension in the upper body. This tension restricts the movement of the bike under you and will prevent the ability to counter act sudden trail obstacles.

Sam explains how dipping your heels prevents your weight being shifted forward and forces it down through your legs. He also offers some useful points that suggest why leaning back over steep terrain is not the best technique.

A final note on handlebar position tops off the perfect guide to positioning your body on a mountain bike, but he principles can translate to any other form of riding.

Here’s our guide to setting up a perfect handlebar position if you aren’t sure of how it’s done:

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Check out the rest of our MTB skills series here.


MTB tips – body position

The attack position is fundamental aspect of mountain biking. So getting it right will reward the rider with a more comfortable and controlled ride. Get it wrong and you run the risk a chiropractor visit or maybe even a free ride in an air ambulance.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

In the video, Sam from Bristol based skills coaching company Pedal Progression talks you through the correct body position.

A good position takes the weight off your hands, meaning there is less tension in the upper body. This tension restricts the movement of the bike under you and will prevent the ability to counter act sudden trail obstacles.

Sam explains how dipping your heels prevents your weight being shifted forward and forces it down through your legs. He also offers some useful points that suggest why leaning back over steep terrain is not the best technique.

A final note on handlebar position tops off the perfect guide to positioning your body on a mountain bike, but he principles can translate to any other form of riding.

Here’s our guide to setting up a perfect handlebar position if you aren’t sure of how it’s done:

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Check out the rest of our MTB skills series here.


How to position your body while on a MTB

The attack position is fundamental aspect of mountain biking. So getting it right will reward the rider with a more comfortable and controlled ride. Get it wrong and you run the risk a chiropractor visit or maybe even a free ride in an air ambulance.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

In the video, Sam from Bristol based skills coaching company Pedal Progression talks you through the correct body position.

A good position takes the weight off your hands, meaning there is less tension in the upper body. This tension restricts the movement of the bike under you and will prevent the ability to counter act sudden trail obstacles.

Sam explains how dipping your heels prevents your weight being shifted forward and forces it down through your legs. He also offers some useful points that suggest why leaning back over steep terrain is not the best technique.

A final note on handlebar position tops off the perfect guide to positioning your body on a mountain bike, but he principles can translate to any other form of riding.

Here’s our guide to setting up a perfect handlebar position if you aren’t sure of how it’s done:

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Check out the rest of our MTB skills series here.








How to body position

The attack position is fundamental aspect of mountain biking. So getting it right will reward the rider with a more comfortable and controlled ride. Get it wrong and you run the risk a chiropractor visit or maybe even a free ride in an air ambulance.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

In the video, Sam from Bristol based skills coaching company Pedal Progression talks you through the correct body position.

A good position takes the weight off your hands, meaning there is less tension in the upper body. This tension restricts the movement of the bike under you and will prevent the ability to counter act sudden trail obstacles.

Sam explains how dipping your heels prevents your weight being shifted forward and forces it down through your legs. He also offers some useful points that suggest why leaning back over steep terrain is not the best technique.

A final note on handlebar position tops off the perfect guide to positioning your body on a mountain bike, but he principles can translate to any other form of riding.

Here’s our guide to setting up a perfect handlebar position if you aren’t sure of how it’s done:

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Check out the rest of our MTB skills series here.








Patchnride 60-second puncture repair system – first look

This all-new take on puncture repair, known as the Patchnride, is straight out of Hollywood. It claims to be able to repair a punctured tyre without it needing to be removed from the wheel, in less than one minute. The product is said to provide a fast, convenient and permanent fix for everything from road tubular and clincher tyres to mountain bike rubber.?

First, you wipe a supplied leak-detector solution along the tyre and look for bubbles to locate the leak. Next, the Patchnride device is primed by pulling back a slider and touching a start button. The slider loads a repair patch, while the start button releases an adhesive, ready to insert into the damaged section of the tyre.

The slider is then pushed forward where it penetrates into the tyre and is immediately pulled out. The repair patch and adhesive are left within the tyre – pressure must then be briefly applied on the repair to allow the adhesive to set. Then just reinflate the tyre as usual and you’re away.?

Patchnride tool:

The Patchnride takes an alternative approach to puncture repair

The Patchnride system uses cartridges to hold the repair patches used in the repair process – these are known as patch pods. You need one patch pod per repair and there are two versions available – one for road tyres and one for mountain bikes and other wider applications. Patchnride will not work with tubeless tyres, yet the firm are aiming to release a tubeless version at the end of this year.

It’s almost the puncture repair equivalent of keyhole surgery and it sounds too good to be true. But there’s only one way to find out, and so we’ve requested one for testing. Meanwhile, the system is available to pre-order for US$30 on the Patchnride website.

Patchnride demonstrates the system in its promotional video below:

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Video: Patchnride 60-second puncture repair demo








Cannondale Trigger 27.5 Carbon Black Inc – first look video

The Trigger 27.5 Carbon Black Inc is Cannondale’s top-end trail bike, and features a full carbon frame, carbon Lefty fork and a Fox DYAD shock.

In the video below, What Mountain Bike editor Jon Woodhouse talks through the bike’s features:

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Video: Cannondale Trigger 27.5 Carbon Black Inc – first look

Pretty much every part of the frame that could be made from carbon is made from carbon – it all adds up to about ?7,000 worth of the stuff. The top tube is slightly longer for 2015, as is the front centre – the ideal behind these geometry tweaks is to make the bike’s handling more stable on high-speed terrain.?

The wheels are 650b, a change from last year’s model, which was on 26in wheels. The rims come courtesy of Enve, as does the handlebar, while Magura takes care of the brakes. Other spec highlights include SRAM XX, Cannondale Hollowgram cranks and an internally routed Reverb post.