video

Cannondale Trigger 27.5 Carbon Black Inc – first look video

The Trigger 27.5 Carbon Black Inc is Cannondale’s top-end trail bike, and features a full carbon frame, carbon Lefty fork and a Fox DYAD shock.

In the video below, What Mountain Bike editor Jon Woodhouse talks through the bike’s features:

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Video: Cannondale Trigger 27.5 Carbon Black Inc – first look

Pretty much every part of the frame that could be made from carbon is made from carbon – it all adds up to about ?7,000 worth of the stuff. The top tube is slightly longer for 2015, as is the front centre – the ideal behind these geometry tweaks is to make the bike’s handling more stable on high-speed terrain.?

The wheels are 650b, a change from last year’s model, which was on 26in wheels. The rims come courtesy of Enve, as does the handlebar, while Magura takes care of the brakes. Other spec highlights include SRAM XX, Cannondale Hollowgram cranks and an internally routed Reverb post.








How to fit cleats to road bike shoes – video

Clipless pedals are an essential component of modern road bikes. They enable more efficient pedalling? by allowing you to pull up as well as pushing down on the pedals. To use them, you also need to fit appropriate cleats to your shoes.

Clipless pedals usually come with the relevant cleats, but you need to ensure the shoes are compatible with the pedal system you are using. Shimano SPD SLs, which we’re using to demonstrate the process, have three bolts, but other systems will differ.

Shimano makes three types of cleat, and helpfully they’re colour-coded to show the amount of ‘float’ each has. Float is the movement the cleat will allow while remaining clipped to the pedal.

Red pedals have zero float, so don’t allow any movement.? Blue will allow two degrees of movement and yellow, six degrees. Most new pedals come with yellow cleats, which are perfect for beginners.

Other manufactures have similar systems so check before you buy.

Also read: How to fit cleats to mountain bike shoes

What you need

  • Hex keys
  • Grease or thread lock
  • Clipless compatible shoes
  • Cleats (usually included with pedals)
  • A pen and some tape

What to do

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Video: How to fit road bike cleats

This video is part of the BikeRadar YouTube channel’s Park Tool Maintenance Monday series. Park Tool products are available from various dealers across the UK.

Fit your cleats

Before fitting the cleat to the shoe, put some grease or thread lock (preferably) onto the thread of the cleat bolt to stop it seizing in place.

Loosely fit the cleats to the shoes – position the cleat so it’s under the ball of your foot. The angle of the cleat should match the natural standing position of your foot – to get an idea of this, stand naturally and assume a riding position – if your feet point out you should set the cleat position to match. You don’t need to be too extreme with the angle so if you’re unsure, set them towards the middle of the shoe and you can tweak them later.

You need to make sure your cleats are compatible with your shoes : you need to make sure your cleats are compatible with your shoes

Tighten the bolts one by one – when the first starts to feel tight, stop turning it and tighten the next . You will need to tighten as a trio – so move between bolts until they are firm.

Fit yourself

Put on the shoes and swing a leg over the bike and clip your foot into the pedal. While leaning against a wall or solid object, clip the other foot into the pedal. Give the cranks a few backwards turns to check the cleat position is still comfortable and that your shoes aren’t rubbing the frame or cranks – if they are, you’ll need to repeat the previous step and readjust accordingly.

After you've fit your pedals, make sure you fit yourself: after you've fit your pedals, make sure you fit yourself

Before you take the bike for a ride, practise clipping in and out of the pedals. Twisting your heel out is the best way to release them.

If you need to fit the pedals too, have a look at our workshop.


How to fit cleats to road bike shoes – video

Clipless pedals are an essential component of modern road bikes. They enable more efficient pedalling? by allowing you to pull up as well as pushing down on the pedals. To use them, you also need to fit appropriate cleats to your shoes.

Clipless pedals usually come with the relevant cleats, but you need to ensure the shoes are compatible with the pedal system you are using. Shimano SPD SLs, which we’re using to demonstrate the process, have three bolts, but other systems will differ.

Shimano makes three types of cleat, and helpfully they’re colour-coded to show the amount of ‘float’ each has. Float is the movement the cleat will allow while remaining clipped to the pedal.

Red pedals have zero float, so don’t allow any movement.? Blue will allow two degrees of movement and yellow, six degrees. Most new pedals come with yellow cleats, which are perfect for beginners.

Other manufactures have similar systems so check before you buy.

Also read: How to fit cleats to mountain bike shoes

What you need

  • Hex keys
  • Grease or thread lock
  • Clipless compatible shoes
  • Cleats (usually included with pedals)
  • A pen and some tape

What to do

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: How to fit road bike cleats

This video is part of the BikeRadar YouTube channel’s Park Tool Maintenance Monday series. Park Tool products are available from various dealers across the UK.

Fit your cleats

Before fitting the cleat to the shoe, put some grease or thread lock (preferably) onto the thread of the cleat bolt to stop it seizing in place.

Loosely fit the cleats to the shoes – position the cleat so it’s under the ball of your foot. The angle of the cleat should match the natural standing position of your foot – to get an idea of this, stand naturally and assume a riding position – if your feet point out you should set the cleat position to match. You don’t need to be too extreme with the angle so if you’re unsure, set them towards the middle of the shoe and you can tweak them later.

You need to make sure your cleats are compatible with your shoes : you need to make sure your cleats are compatible with your shoes

Tighten the bolts one by one – when the first starts to feel tight, stop turning it and tighten the next . You will need to tighten as a trio – so move between bolts until they are firm.

Fit yourself

Put on the shoes and swing a leg over the bike and clip your foot into the pedal. While leaning against a wall or solid object, clip the other foot into the pedal. Give the cranks a few backwards turns to check the cleat position is still comfortable and that your shoes aren’t rubbing the frame or cranks – if they are, you’ll need to repeat the previous step and readjust accordingly.

After you've fit your pedals, make sure you fit yourself: after you've fit your pedals, make sure you fit yourself

Before you take the bike for a ride, practise clipping in and out of the pedals. Twisting your heel out is the best way to release them.

If you need to fit the pedals too, have a look at our workshop.


How to fit mountain bike cleats – video

Cleats are small metal objects that attach to the bottom of compatible shoes and allow you to affix them to your clipless pedals.

Pedals come packages with matched cleats, which will fit any MTB-specific shoe. We’re demonstrating the fitting procedure with Shimano SPDs.

Mountain bike cleats are not compatible with road shoes, however.

What you need

  • Hex keys
  • Grease or thread lock
  • Clipless compatible shoes
  • Cleats (usually included with pedals)
  • A pen and some tape

What to do

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: How to fit MTB cleats

This video is part of the BikeRadar YouTube channel’s Park Tool Maintenance Monday series. Park Tool products are available from various dealers across the UK.

Fit your cleats

Before fitting the cleat to the shoe, you need to work out where the ball of your foot is. If you put the shoe on, and stick some tape on the side, you can locate it and make a mark without ruining your new shoes.

Before fitting the cleat, put some grease or thread lock (preferably) onto the thread of the cleat bolt to stop it seizing in place. Loosely fit the cleats to the shoes – position the cleat so it’s under the ball of your foot according to the mark you made.

Pedals come with matching cleats, which will fit all mountain bike shoes:

The angle of the cleat should match the natural standing position of your foot – to get an idea of this, stand naturally and assume a riding position – if your feet point out you should set the cleat position to match. You don’t need to be too extreme with the angle so if you’re unsure, set them straight and you can tweak them later.

Tighten the bolts one by one – when the first starts to feel tight, stop turning it and tighten the other. You will need to tighten as a pair – so alternate between bolts until they are firm.

Fit yourself

Put on the shoes and swing a leg over the bike and clip your foot into the pedal. While leaning against a wall or solid object, clip the other foot into the pedal. Give the cranks a few backwards turns to check the cleat position is still comfortable and that your shoes aren’t rubbing the frame or cranks – if so you’ll need to repeat the previous step and readjust accordingly.

xxx: xxx

Before you take the bike for a ride, practise clipping in and out of the pedals. Twisting your heel out is the best way to release them.

If you need to fit the pedals too, look for the link in the video description.


How to fit mountain bike cleats – video

Cleats are small metal objects that attach to the bottom of compatible shoes and allow you to affix them to your clipless pedals.

Pedals come packages with matched cleats, which will fit any MTB-specific shoe. We’re demonstrating the fitting procedure with Shimano SPDs.

Mountain bike cleats are not compatible with road shoes, however.

What you need

  • Hex keys
  • Grease or thread lock
  • Clipless compatible shoes
  • Cleats (usually included with pedals)
  • A pen and some tape

What to do

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: How to fit MTB cleats

This video is part of the BikeRadar YouTube channel’s Park Tool Maintenance Monday series. Park Tool products are available from various dealers across the UK.

Fit your cleats

Before fitting the cleat to the shoe, you need to work out where the ball of your foot is. If you put the shoe on, and stick some tape on the side, you can locate it and make a mark without ruining your new shoes.

Before fitting the cleat, put some grease or thread lock (preferably) onto the thread of the cleat bolt to stop it seizing in place. Loosely fit the cleats to the shoes – position the cleat so it’s under the ball of your foot according to the mark you made.

Pedals come with matching cleats, which will fit all mountain bike shoes:

The angle of the cleat should match the natural standing position of your foot – to get an idea of this, stand naturally and assume a riding position – if your feet point out you should set the cleat position to match. You don’t need to be too extreme with the angle so if you’re unsure, set them straight and you can tweak them later.

Tighten the bolts one by one – when the first starts to feel tight, stop turning it and tighten the other. You will need to tighten as a pair – so alternate between bolts until they are firm.

Fit yourself

Put on the shoes and swing a leg over the bike and clip your foot into the pedal. While leaning against a wall or solid object, clip the other foot into the pedal. Give the cranks a few backwards turns to check the cleat position is still comfortable and that your shoes aren’t rubbing the frame or cranks – if so you’ll need to repeat the previous step and readjust accordingly.

xxx: xxx

Before you take the bike for a ride, practise clipping in and out of the pedals. Twisting your heel out is the best way to release them.

If you need to fit the pedals too, look for the link in the video description.


CycleOps route-creation contest promotes product’s indoor/outdoor sync

MADISON, Wis. (BRAIN) — CycleOps is running a contest that encourages cyclists to record outdoor training routes that can be replicated indoors on the company’s Virtual Training system.

Portland’s Community Cycling Center celebrates 20th anniversary

PORTLAND, Ore. (BRAIN) — Portland’s Community Cycling Center, the city’s first nonprofit bike shop, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this month. This week, the Center launched an anniversary campaign video (below) featuring its founder, Brian Lacy

Five reasons why your next mountain bike will be 650b – video

Like it or not, if you’re going to buy a new mountain bike there’s a big chance it will have 650b (27.5in) wheels.

The in-betweener wheel size hasn’t exactly been welcomed into the MTB world with open arms, but it actually has many benefits, as explained in the video below:

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Video: Five reasons why your next bike will be 650b?

From performance gains to focused R&D in bike design, we think these are five good reasons why your next bike should – and probably will – have 650b wheels.

Like this? Don’t forget to subscribe to the BikeRadar YouTube channel for all the latest videos.








2014 Downhill World Cup #2: The Athertons do the double

Putting the rain in rainforest

There’s something special about any mountain bike race in the rain. Everything seems to change. Some riders crash, some get lucky and some have the run of their life. A rainy race is the day to get noticed. Everyone headed to Australia expecting a dry, fast and fairly simple course, but after about an hour of practice that all changed. The rain came down and destroyed the course, turning it into one of the hardest race tracks in recent history. With sections now as technical as any other World Cup, and a pedalling section that was ‘harder than South Africa’, this was a true test for the world’s fastest riders. There certainly hasn’t been a race with this many crashes in quite some time, and the three-and-a-half-minute track soon became a four-minute-plus track thanks to good old Mother Nature.

Not-so-slow Loris

In the Juniors, France’s Loris Vergier (Lapierre Gravity Republic) got back to his winning ways in both qualifying and finals. Australia’s Aiden Varley (Giant/YVC) came second, with FMD Racings’s new signing Neil Stewart in third. Fellow Brit Taylor Vernon (GT Factory Racing) continued to show improvement with an impressive fourth place, while Trek World Racing’s Laurie Greenland finished 11th – it must have been a tough race for him to make his World Cup debut at! Last week’s winner, America’s Luca Shaw (SRAM/Troy Lee Designs), finished 10th, giving the series leader’s jersey away to Vergier.

Battle of the Brits

The elite women’s race was a sign of what’s to come for the rest of the year – a battle between British riders Manon Carpenter (Madison Saracen) and Rachel Atherton (GT Factory Racing). Rachel would go 1-1 and Manon 2-2, crashing in both qualifying and finals, leaving them tied in the overall series rankings heading into the break before round 3 in Fort William, Scotland at the start of June. Rachel won by a huge 11 seconds, showing she’s going to be strong all year. Third place went to France’s Myriam Nicole (Commencal Riding Addiction) after her countrywoman, and Rachel’s arch rival, Emmeline Ragot (Lapierre Gravity Republic) crashed in the rock garden.

Home crowd hopes

The two top Australian riders came into the elite men’s race with high hopes for a win on home soil, but it wasn’t to be. Sam Hill (CRC-Nukeproof) put together a great run and took the early lead, leaving him with a long sit in the hot seat and fifth place on the podium. Next up was local hero Mick Hannah (Hutchinson UR), a favourite for the win. It just wasn’t meant to be for Hannah though – a crash meant he ended up off the podium in 14th. The rain really didn’t suit him, and had the weather swung a different way, his day could have ended very differently. An honourable mention has to go to Kiwi rider Ed Masters (Bergamont-Hayes) too. Never previously seen as a serious threat to the podium regulars, he qualified in an incredible fourth place and was looking great in finals too until a crash took him out of contention. The YOLO enthusiast might have YOLO’d too hard. 

Crash happy

Crashes were a big part of the day, also taking out Britain’s Danny Hart (Giant Factory Off-Road), Greg Williamson (Trek World Racing), Ruaridh Cunningham (Unior Tools) and Brendan Fairclough (Gstadd-Scott), not to mention France’s Loic Bruni (Lapierre Gravity Republic), to name just a few. The rainforest was far from kind. 

The biggest upset happened during UK downhill legend Steve Peat’s (Santa Cruz Syndicate) run though. Fellow Brit Adam Brayon (Hope Factory Racing) had crashed into a tree and was being attended to by medical staff. While this was happening a fan decided to help out by taking Brayton’s bike down to the bottom of the hill. But instead of walking it down, he decided to ride it, despite not having a helmet. As he went flying into the whoops section he went over the bars and sustained some pretty serious injuries himself – check out the video below. Only in Australia! Thankfully, both Brayton and the fan are now recovering – healing vibes to both! The crash meant Peaty was red flagged and got a second run down the hill. This turned out well for him – his second run was much better than his messy first run and saw him finish in seventh place.

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Year of the Rat?

Britain’s Josh ‘Ratboy’ Bryceland (Santa Cruz Syndicate) is no stranger to riding in the mud, and he used that to his advantage, putting in a great run that saw him take second place and show the world what he’s capable of yet again. Yet to score that elusive first World Cup win, could this be the year it finally happens? He’s certainly getting closer. His mate Sam Dale (Madison Saracen) also had a stormer of a race, finishing eighth despite a crash, giving him his second top 10 finish in a row. Fellow young gun Neko Mulally (Trek World Racing) was in touch too, proving his success at round one was no fluke. A small crash slowed him down but the American jumped straight back on the bike and managed to secure third place – his first podium position.

Minnaar out

Bryceland’s teammate Greg Minnaar had a day to forget – the South African was disqualified after veering off the track and rejoining it in a different place. He clearly didn’t gain time, so it seems a tough ruling, but rules are rules. It deals a severe blow to his hopes of securing the series title though.

Advantage Atherton

Brtiain’s Gee Atherton (GT Factory Racing) made the decision to ride on flat pedals instead of his usual clips due to the mud, and had to borrow some Five Ten shoes from someone in the crowd! Maybe he didn’t plan for rain in Australia? The gamble paid off – he crossed the line an astonishing three seconds up on Bryceland. But with two riders to go, would it be enough? 

Round 1 winner Aaron Gwin (Specialized Racing) left the start gate fast, but after some mistakes, including riding through a rock section on his saddle with both feet unclipped, the American would have to settle for fourth place. That was good enough for him to hold on to the series points lead though. Top qualifier Sam Blenkinsop (Lapierre Gravity Republic) had a similar story to tell, making mistakes in the treacherous conditions and finishing sixth. So Gee took it! 

What a race! Drastically different to South Africa, and a massive challenge for the riders and teams. The series now takes a month-long break before moving to Fort William, where the battle will resume. The race for the overall series title is looking more exciting than ever, with Blenkinsop, Mulally and Bryceland in third, fourth and fifth respectively, and Atherton chasing Gwin for the top step. Anything could happen – stay tuned!

Check out the Red Bull highlights video below:

http://www.redbull.com/uk/en/bike/stories/1331647665918/uci-world-cup-cairns-race-day








How to repair a puncture – video

Knowing how to repair a puncture is an essential skill that every cyclist needs to master. It can be daunting for the inexperienced but only takes a few minutes once you know what you’re doing.

In this video, BikeRadar’s James Tennant explains how to carry out the task in a step-by-step walkthough, which demonstrates the procedure on a mountain bike.

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Need to stock up on tools before you start? You can purchase Park Tools used in the video at a number of dealers across the UK and internationally.

Here’s written instructions for those who prefer them to visual demos.

1 Find the puncture

Starting at the valve, check all the way around the tyre’s tread to find the cause of the puncture. Remove any glass or grit that you spot. Even if you find one possible cause, continue checking the tyre until you get back to the valve.

1: 1

2 Remove the tube

Let the air out of the inner tube and push the valve up into the tyre – unscrewing and retaining the valve ring, if fitted. On the side of the wheel opposite the valve, slip a tyre lever under the tyre’s bead and a further tyre lever about 5cm away. Pull the nearer tyre lever (available from all good bike shops) towards you, lifting the tyre’s bead over the edge of the rim.

Continue until one bead of the tyre is completely free of the rim. Pull the tube out. Remove the tyre completely from the rim – with most tyres this can be done by hand unless exceptionally tight.

Note: it’s not always essential to remove the tube from the tyre, as the video above demonstrates.

2: 2

3 Inflate the punctured tube

Inflate the tube and listen for air escaping. Passing the surface of the tube over the lips is a favourite trick of mine. If the hole still can’t be found, re-inflate the tube and pass it through a bowl of water until you spot escaping bubbles. Then dry the tube before proceeding to the next step.

Take care – do not twist a push-fit pump on the valve. The pump should be pushed on straight and pulled off with a single straight pull. The stem nut can easily be broken off if the pump is twisted sideways.

3: 3

4 Prepare the tube

Select the correct size of patch – use a bigger rather than a smaller patch if in doubt. Roughen the surface of the tube around the hole with emery paper. Ensure that any moulding marks are flattened completely. Apply one drop of tyre cement and spread it thinly with your finger over a 2cm circle around the hole. Allow to dry. Apply a second thin layer similarly. Once again, allow to dry – the rubber cement will change from shiny to matt.

4a: 4a

4b: 4b

5 Patch the tube

Inflate the tube slightly – this will help to highlight the position of the hole. Firmly press the patch into place after removing the backing foil. If there’s a thin cellophane backing on the patch, it can be left on. Dust the repair with chalk, talcum powder or road dust to prevent it sticking to the tyre casing.

5a: 5a

5b: 5b

6 Check the casing

Before refitting the tube, double-check the tyre casing from inside for the cause of your puncture. On one occasion after riding a canal towpath with hedge clippings, I found over half a dozen thorns! Placing the tube over the tyre will help to you to discover the position of the puncture. Run your fingertips carefully around the inside of the tyre to feel for the cause of the puncture and remove.

6: 6

7 Refit the tyre

After repairing the tube and checking the tyre for glass, thorns or any other sharp debris, refit one bead to the rim. Slightly inflate the tube and refit it to the rim, putting the valve through its hole first. Starting at the opposite side of the rim to the valve, use your thumbs to lift the tyre’s bead (the part of the tyre that connects the rim to the wheel) over the rim. Work around the rim until there’s just one small section of tyre left. Push the valve up into the tyre and then, using your thumbs, ease the remaining section of the tyre’s bead over the edge of the rim.

7a: 7a

7b: 7b

8 Make final checks

Check that the tube isn’t trapped between the rim and the tyre bead. Inflate to the point where the tyre feels soft but has maintained its shape. Check that the moulding mark around the tyre follows the rim evenly all the way around. If not, deflate a little and ease any high spots down and pull low spots up until the bead is fitted evenly.

Inflate to the recommended pressure and check once again that the tyre’s bead is still seated evenly and that the tyre isn’t lifting off the rim at any point. Finally, check that the tread is running reasonably straight by spinning the wheel. If not, deflate the tyre and start again from the beginning of this step.

8: 8

Puncture fixing tips

  • When taking the tube out of the tyre, note which way the tube was around in the wheel. This will help identify the position of the hole in the tube once the position of the object in the tyre causing the puncture has been found.
  • With a ballpoint pen, mark the hole with a cross so you can pinpoint it accurately.
  • If you don’t have any emery paper, roughen the tube by rubbing it against a stone or the road surface.
  • For tyres that blow off easily: fit a thicker rim tape or a second rim tape – this prevents the tyre bead sinking into the rim well and blowing off the opposite side.
  • For tight tyres: fit a thinner rim tape if possible – this will make your tyres easier to fit and remove.
  • Be very particular with your technique. The last section of the tyre to be fitted to the rim should be at the valve. Make sure that the tyre’s bead is pushed as far as possible into the well of the rim. Some very tight-fitting tyres may need tyre levers to fit them. Using VAR 425 special tyre levers will help to prevent puncturing the innertube when refitting the tyre.

Puncture identification

Two small holes in a tube placed fairly close together indicate a pinch puncture. This is caused by the tube getting trapped between the tyre and the rim when riding over a sharp object. Tyres not inflated hard enough are a frequent cause of this. Check that the tyre’s sidewall isn’t cut. If it is, you may need to use an emergency repair – see the ‘Emergency tyre repairs’ section below.

A hole on the inner side of the tube indicates that the puncture was caused by a spoke head. Check around the inside of the rim to ensure that the rim tape properly covers the spoke holes and no spoke end protrudes above the inner surface of the rim. If this happens it’ll need filing down.

A less common cause of a puncture is a rough edge to the valve hole rim. The puncture will be at the base of the valve and will not be repairable.

Puncture inspection: puncture inspection

Puncture inspection: puncture inspection

Create your own puncture kit

  • Feather edge patches
  • Rubber solution
  • Pair of plastic tyre levers
  • Piece of fine emery paper
  • Small adjustable spanner, if using wheels with hex nuts
  • Allen key if using Allen-bolt-fitting wheels
  • Reliable pump
  • Keyring LED – useful if you’re riding in the dark with a dynamo
  • Always carry a spare tube too.

Pump aside, all this should pack in an underseat bag.

Puncture kit: puncture kit

Weekly check-up

Check your tyres for cuts in the tread, swelling in the sidewall, or serious wear. Tyres with cuts, swelling or casing visible through the tread must be replaced. Remove any grit or glass embedded in the tread. Check your tyre pressures with a proper gauge. Tyres inflated to the correct tyre pressure will have fewer punctures and a longer life. The recommended pressures are normally marked on the sidewall of the tyre.

Use your spare

Repairing a puncture is very difficult in the rain as the patch will not stick to the tube. Instead, fit the spare tube that you always carry! The spare tube is also essential if a tyre blows off a rim, or if the tube is cut by the valve hole.

Emergency tyre repairs

Double over a largish section of heavy duty polythene. Trim off a piece 10cm wider than the gash and 5cm wider than the tyre. Remove the tyre from the rim. Wrap the double layer of the patch around the inside of the tyre casing centred on the slit or cut. With the patch overlapping each side of the casing, refit the first tyre bead, trapping the emergency patch.

Fit a new tube if necessary and inflate it a tad. Refit the second tyre bead with the patched section last. Check that the patch is trapped at both sides. Reinflate the tyre and trim off any excess patch. The patch will be held in place miraculously by the tyre’s air pressure.