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Fox Factory reports 10.3% sales growth in bike products in Q1

SCOTTS VALLEY, Calif.

Kent buys Univega brand, will relaunch it as a US-made IBD brand

MANNING, S.C. (BRAIN) — Kent International is bringing back the Univega brand, once a bike shop mainstay.

Donnelly Sports ends Clement license, launches Donnelly Cycling

FRIEDRICHSHAFEN, Germany (BRAIN) — Donnelly Sports LLC, which has been licensing the Clement name from Pirelli, is ending its use of the trademark with the Italian-based tire brand. Donnelly Sports’ owner, Donn Kellogg, will launch the tires and wheels under the Donnelly Cycling brand name this fall. Donnelly will unveil its new branding at the Eurobike show here this week.

Fox and SRAM suits continue in two states as costs mount

Editor’s note: A version of this article appeared in the Jan. 1 issue Bicycle Retailer & Industry News.

Diamondback works with Bill Nye on series of videos aimed at beginner bike riders

KENT, Wash.

Blue continues to rebuild in marketplace

PARK CITY, Utah (BRAIN) — When editors at PressCamp walk into Room 6131 at the Silver Barron Lodge, the Triad Elite SL Di2 is an attention grabber.

Specialized licenses Hed’s patent for aero rim shape

ROSEVILLE, Minn. (BRAIN) — Specialized and Hed Cycling announced that the two companies are collaborating on product development and that Specialized is licensing Hed’s patent for aerodynamic rim shaping and design.

Specialized licenses Hed’s patent for aero rim shape

ROSEVILLE, Minn. (BRAIN) — Specialized and Hed Cycling announced that the two companies are collaborating on product development and that Specialized is licensing Hed’s patent for aerodynamic rim shaping and design. The patent, No

Donnelly looks to rebuild Clement tire brand in Europe, hires Michael Johnston

DENVER (BRAIN) — Donnelly Sports — a Denver-based company that develops and markets Clement tires, licensing the trademark from Pirelli — is looking to rebuild the historic brand in its original home, Europe. Donnelly has hired Michael Johnston, a former Mavic executive, as Clement’s European manager. Johnston started June 1 and is based in?Talloires? Rhone-Alpes, just outside of Annecy, France

Yeti SB6C X01 review

Yeti’s always been up to its eyeballs in racing and has certainly used some weird and wonderful ideas to try and find a winning edge along the way.

Hooped BMX-style rear ends, carbon and steel specials, rubber bumpers on sticks and 60-tooth chainrings, parallelogram pivot systems, sliding rails, rotating eccentrics… they’ve all appeared on the trademark turquoise machines. Its latest innovation is no less radical, but delivers outstanding no-brainer performance in every situation as its development race history shows.

  • Highs: Great geometry and sorted suspension for enduro DH winning and climb conquering speed
  • Lows: It’s a ton of money
  • Buy If: You can afford a genuine do anything damn fast trail machine and like to flash the latest tech

Frame and equipment: Graves diggin’

We’re not talking just any races either. Yeti’s multi-discipline racer and development rider Jared Graves took the SB6C’s predecessor – the SB66C – to third place at the 2013 DH World Championships in Pietermaritzburg. That specially prepped bike also ran a 180mm travel Fox 36 fork to give 65-degree head angle geometry that’s an obvious precursor to the 65.5-degree head of the SB6C.

Graves has since won two rounds of the Enduro World Series on board prototypes of the SB6C, which saw it get a lower bottom bracket and longer wheelbase than the SB66C as well as significantly swollen super-oversized carbon tubes right through. That means a sub-6lb chassis weight even with two seriously stiff frame halves and the unique Switch Infinity suspension system sitting in a big window at the base of the seat tube.

The twin shaft switch infinity system is actually a lot simpler than it looks, and saves 100g over the previous eccentric mounted version:

The twin shaft Switch Infinity system is actually a lot simpler than it looks, and saves 100g over the previous eccentric mounted version

Switch Infinity replaces the eccentric mounting drum of the original Switch system with two vertical Kashima coated Fox Shox built shafts. These let the main pivot slide a few mm up and then back down as the suspension goes through its stroke, slightly altering the wheel path and its relation to chain torque in the process.

Ride and handling: to Infinity and beyond

Having spent ages trying to find a pedal friendly but progressive sweet spot with the original Switch setup we prepared to tune the new system for an appropriately Infinite time. Yeti, Graves and Fox have obviously been working hard, because shock response is pretty much pitch perfect in every situation. The Float X piggyback shock is comfortably smooth and vacuums up as many big hits as you want in Descend mode but there’s still enough support to feel the tyres in corners, or pop and hop if it’s faster or just more fun. Flick it into Pedal mode and you can really drive the bike hard through the pedals or turns but the wheel path and shock rate deflection means it still sticks well over small stuff without hanging up on big boulders.

Fox’s revamped 36 fork is a massive improvement over the 34 in terms of stiffness and accuracy, making it well worth the extra weight and five-bolt axle fit and release fiddling:

Fox’s revamped 36 fork is a massive improvement over the 34 in terms of stiffness and accuracy

Give it a car park wrestle and there’s definite flex through the unavoidably narrow Infinity architecture and upper swing link. However, the super-stiff frame sections, guttering girth Enve carbon rims, the long, low geometry and vice-like grip from the Fox 36 fork meant it never overshot a line or apex on the trail whether we were blatting down red/black runs or charging back up them.

Even with slow, growly grip Maxxis High Roller II rubber we took several minutes off our previous five-lap Power Hour time at North Yorkshire’s Stainburn trail centre. Interestingly, as well as getting close to our best downhill times, we consistently bested our PRs up the relentlessly technical, rocky, twisty black-rated climb back up, including a KOM on our third lap – useful statistical proof that Yeti’s new green dream machine is a true race-anywhere all-rounder that creates a whole new benchmark for 2015.

This article was originally published in What Mountain Bike magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.