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Knog’s new PWR is the Swiss Army Knife of powerbanks

Hate scrabbling for bike light batteries? Sick of losing charge on your Garmin during an epic backpacking adventure? Aussie brand Knog has created a power bank that can solve both these problems, and even pump out tunes wirelessly at the end of a hard day’s riding. Meet the Knog PWR range.

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Now it’s only just launched on Kickstarter today, so you can’t actually buy these devices yet, but they do look good. Knog has considerable form when it comes to designing well-thought-out, innovative cycling accessories — its new Oi bike bell for example, which attracted over five times its original Kickstarter goal of AU$20,000.

“It’s such an obvious idea really — you don’t use all these products at the same time, so why not save on batteries,” says Knog’s CEO, Hugo Davidson. “If you do use these all at the same time, then you can have as many batteries as you like, giving you longer run-time. It’s win-win”.

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The Knog PWR range

OK let’s look at each of these devices in turn, starting with the battery pack that powers them all, called the PWR Bank.

Like all products in the range it’s made from machined aluminium and simply slots into whichever ‘host device’ you want to use it with. The PWR Bank has a 3,200Ah capacity that’s capable of charging an iPhone 6 once and still have enough juice left for around six hours of music playback on the PWR Speaker. It weighs 95g and measures 30×92mm.

Knog PWR product pricing

  • PWR Bank: US$49.95 / AU$65
  • PWR Bike 300: US$75 / AU$99 (Kickstarter price AU$78)
  • PWR Bike 800: US$95 / AU$125 (Kickstarter price AU$99)
  • PWR Head Torch: US$110 / AU$145 (Kickstarter AU$105)
  • PWR Lantern: US$75 / AU$112 (Kickstarter price AU$79)
  • PWR Speaker US$85 / AU$112 (Kickster price AU$89)

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

5 bike handling problems caused by bad suspension set-up (and how to fix them)

Your bike’s suspension set-up can be directly responsible for some rather unpleasant handling characteristics. A lot of riders simply do not realise that most of these problems can be dialed out with little more than a bit of know-how.

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In this video, BikeRadar’s Technical Editor Jon Woodhouse explores the five most common bike-handling issues that can be a direct result of your bike’s suspension set-up.

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Among other topics, Jon covers the pitfalls of incorrect sag and rebound adjustment, along with the importance of spring curves and a trick to maintain traction on loose ground.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

5 bike handling problems caused by bad suspension set-up (and how to fix them)

Your bike’s suspension set-up can be directly responsible for some rather unpleasant handling characteristics. A lot of riders simply do not realise that most of these problems can be dialed out with little more than a bit of know-how.

  • Which is faster: hardtail or full-suspension?
  • 6 top suspension maintenance tips
  • How to adjust the rebound and compression settings on your mountain bike

In this video, BikeRadar’s Technical Editor Jon Woodhouse explores the five most common bike-handling issues that can be a direct result of your bike’s suspension set-up.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Among other topics, Jon covers the pitfalls of incorrect sag and rebound adjustment, along with the importance of spring curves and a trick to maintain traction on loose ground.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com