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OneUp Components launches 45t range expander sprocket for Shimano XTR

Shimano did a lot of things right with its latest XTR mechanical and electronic mountain bike groupsets but one common gripe lies in the 11-40T cassette, which doesn’t offer up a sufficiently wide range for many riders to comfortably run a single chainring. OneUp Components comes to the rescue with a new 45-tooth add-on cog – plus XTR-specific narrow-wide chainrings – which adds 12.5 percent to the total range and puts the modified XTR setup nearly on even footing with SRAM XX1.

As with other OneUp Components range-extending cogs, this latest version is CNC-machined from 7075-T6 aluminium plate and installed in between the cassette and rear hub. The stock 17-19T cluster is replaced with the included single 18-tooth nickel-plated hardened steel sprocket to maintain relatively even ratio jumps throughout the spread.

All of this fits on the same freehub body as the standard XTR M9000 cassette, too, meaning that the OneUp-modified XTR cassette will now also let current 10-speed riders switch to a true wide-range 11-speed setup without having to change wheels (as they would have to do with any of SRAM’s 1×11 mountain bike drivetrains).

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“This gives you 11-13-15-18-21-24-27-31-35-40-45 (stock is 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-27-31-35-40),†said OneUp Components’ Sam Richards. “Everything is colour matched to the stock XTR cassette for a fully integrated look and feel.â€

OneUp says the modified cassette yields two distinct shifting ‘zones’ – one with smaller gaps for climbing, and one with bigger gaps for descending

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

OneUp Components launches 45-tooth range expander sprocket for Shimano XTR

Shimano did a lot of things right with its latest XTR mechanical and electronic mountain bike groupsets but one common gripe lies in the 11-40T cassette, which doesn’t offer up a sufficiently wide range for many riders to comfortably run a single chainring. OneUp Components comes to the rescue with a new 45-tooth add-on cog – plus XTR-specific narrow-wide chainrings – which adds 12.5 percent to the total range and puts the modified XTR setup nearly on even footing with SRAM XX1.

As with other OneUp Components range-extending cogs, this latest version is CNC-machined from 7075-T6 aluminium plate and installed in between the cassette and rear hub. The stock 17-19T cluster is replaced with the included single 18-tooth nickel-plated hardened steel sprocket to maintain relatively even ratio jumps throughout the spread.

All of this fits on the same freehub body as the standard XTR M9000 cassette, too, meaning that the OneUp-modified XTR cassette will now also let current 10-speed riders switch to a true wide-range 11-speed setup without having to change wheels (as they would have to do with any of SRAM’s 1×11 mountain bike drivetrains).

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

“This gives you 11-13-15-18-21-24-27-31-35-40-45 (stock is 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-27-31-35-40),†said OneUp Components’ Sam Richards. “Everything is colour matched to the stock XTR cassette for a fully integrated look and feel.â€

OneUp says the modified cassette yields two distinct shifting ‘zones’ – one with smaller gaps for climbing, and one with bigger gaps for descending

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

More electronic bike gadgets from CES 2015

This year’s Consumer Electronics Show wasn’t just filled with camera gear to help you put together that awesome edit you’ve always wanted.

There was also lots of other bike-friendly electronica on hand to help make your next ride a little more entertaining, your next mountain bike camping trip a little more fun and your precious smartphone a little less apt to blow up when you crash.

Portable power solutions for your favourite electronic cycling gadgets

Camping out in the wilderness with your mountain bike is supposed to be all about getting back to basics, unplugging from the world and enjoying all that Mother Nature has to offer.

The reality, however, is that many of us simply can’t handle going that far off the grid. There were several interesting bits at CES designed to help keep your gear powered up when there isn’t an outlet handy.

Goal Zero made a name for itself with its comprehensive range of portable solar chargers but the company has now expanded into portable, high-capacity battery systems to keep your USB-rechargeable gadgets up-and-running.

The new Goal Zero Switch 10 Multi-Tool Kit (US$120) features a 3000mAh Li-ion battery (enough to recharge a Garmin Edge 810 three times) plus an attachable 110-lumen LED flashlight to help you find your way around the campsite. Once the battery is depleted, you can plug it into the included folding solar panel to recharge it in as little as four hours.

Naturally, goal zero still has plenty of solar powered options available, too:

The complete Goal Zero Switch 10 Multi-Tool Kit features a portable solar panel, battery pack with built-in USB outputs, and interchangeable tips that turn it into a flashlight or – yes – a fan

Alternatively, the US$80 Goal Zero Torch 250 sports a 180-lumen spotlight, a 70-lumen floodlight, and a bigger 4,400mAh battery. When that’s depleted, you can hook it up to a solar panel or even just crank the built-in generator in a pinch.

Meanwhile, Eton packs everything together into its US$100 BoostSolar, which includes a 5,000mAh Li-ion battery with enough current for a full-sized tablet and a built-in solar panel to keep the cells topped up. If you know the battery will last long enough for your trip on its own, you can remove it completely and still it for recharging your devices with the handy on-board USB ports.

Eton's boostsolar portable power solution features a solar panel on one side and a rechargeable 5,000mah battery plugged into the back - enough to recharge a garmin edge 810 five times even when the sun isn't shining:

The Eton BoostSolar combines a portable solar panel and high-capacity Li-ion battery pack to keep all of your devices powered up when you’re off the grid

Lots of options to juice up your smartphone

None of those recharging options will do you much good if you’ve shattered your smartphone in a wreck. Not surprisingly, there were plenty of tough phone cases on hand at CES.

One of the most exciting is the new US$129 OtterBox Resurgence Frē, which combines a supplemental 2,600mAh rechargeable battery (already featured in the standard Resurgence) with the rugged, waterproof protection the company is best known for. Expect a public release later this year.

OtterBox showed off its new resurgence fr_ battery case, which combines a 2,600mah supplemental battery pack with the rugged, waterproof protection the company is known for:

The new OtterBox Resurgence Frē combines a rugged, waterproof outer case with a supplemental battery pack to keep your new iPhone 6 running strong while tracking your ride on GPS and keep it in one piece if you crash

Apple’s new iPhone 6 already has a remarkably good camera but Element Case and Schneider Optics have teamed up to take those capabilities even further.

The new US$249 iPro 6 Trio case boosts the standard Apple optics with three interchangeable lenses (wide angle, telephoto and fisheye), all with glass elements and proper anti-reflective coatings. Super wide and macro lenses are optional.

To help with framing that perfect riding shot, the case also features standard 1/4-20in threaded mounts for use with the included handle.

Element case and schneider optics have joined forces for a slick new camera case for the apple iphone 6. the new ipro trio allows you to boost your phone's camera capabilities with a range of high-quality lenses:

We’re eager to try out Element Case’s new iPro Trio, with its interchangeable lens made by Schneider Optics

Listen to music while riding – safely and discreetly

We at BikeRadar know that a lot of you prefer to ride with music. Completely shutting out the outside world may not be the best idea but there are alternatives that let you listen to your favourite tunes and still be aware of your surroundings.

AfterShokz showed off its US$100 Bluez 2 headphones, which conduct sound waves through your skull to your inner ear instead of porting them directly into your ear canal. While the sound quality is a bit tinnier than conventional ear buds, they leave your ears completely open to ambient noise while also lending the added convenience of Bluetooth pairing with your smartphone and a built-in mic for taking calls if you’re so inclined. This latest version adds active noise cancellation to help decrease wind noise – one of our major complaints with the original model.

Bone conduction headphones such as the aftershokz bluez 2 send sound through your skull to your inner ear, leaving the ear canal open to hear ambient noise for better safety:

AfterShokz Bluez 2 headphones port music through your skull into your inner ear, leaving your ear canal available to hear ambient noise while riding

The folks at Cynaps, meanwhile, use the same bone conduction technology on its new Mint earphones but with a clever modular design that lets you attach the transducers to a standard headband, a hat, helmet straps, or any variety of other headwear.

Cynaps says you can even attach them to a window or other sound-conductive object to effectively turn it into a giant speaker. Cynaps is currently in the crowdsourcing stage for the Mint, which is available for US$79 via Indiegogo.

While the cynaps mint has wires connecting the transducers to the main power source, the unit connects to your music source via bluetooth:

The Cynaps Mint is another bone conduction headset but with removable transducers that can be attached to your helmet straps

For more information, visit www.goalzero.com, www.etoncorp.com, www.otterbox.com, www.elementcase.com, www.aftershokz.com and www.maxvirtual.com.








Canyon Strive CF – first look – updated with video

When Canyon launched its latest enduro bike, the carbon Strive CF, on 12 June, the reveal was long awaited. All we knew about the bike was what we could guess from seeing team riders, such as Fabian Barel and Joe Barnes, riding heavily guarded prototypes that had cloth shrouds covering the suspension systems!

For the Strive CF, Canyon designed a new concept called ShapeShifter. It’s a relatively simple but effective way of adjusting geometry and suspension kinematics on the fly, switching between what Canyon calls XC and DH modes.

Having now had a chance to test ride the bike, this article was updated on 18 December to include the below video in which What Mountain Bike’s Jon Woodhouse and Tom Marvin chat about what’s surely one of 2014’s most interesting new bikes. The Strive CF will be reviewed in issue 169 of What Mountain Bike.

You’ll find all the original details about the Canyon Strive CF from the launch under the video.

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The ShapeShifter is a bar-operated mini-piston, which actuates a knuckle link just below the main rocker on the frame. This moves the shock backward or forward in relation to the rocker, adjusting its spring rate, the suspension system’s travel and the geometry of the bike. The piston is nestled between frame tubes and rocker linkages, and looks like it’s well out of the way of mud, thanks to the plastic cover over the top. The piston only moves when actuated, so it shouldn’t cause too many maintenance issues, and Canyon reckons it only adds 200g to the weight of the bike.

In XC mode the Strive CF has 130mm of rear travel, which is relatively stiff compared to DH mode. Head and seat angles are, Canyon says, 1.5 degrees steeper (67.5 and 75 degrees, respectively) and the bottom bracket is around 20mm higher. This geometry makes the bike more suited to climbing, while the stiffer suspension reduces pedal bob. Canyon says that while some of the shocks offered on the bikes provide compression damping adjustment, it’s not really needed.

The shapeshifter piston is hidden below the plastic cover. the green dot denotes the bike is in xc mode:

The ShapeShifter piston is hidden below the plastic cover. The green dot denotes the bike is in XC mode

Drop the bike into DH mode and the angles slacken to 66 degrees at the head tube and 73.5 degrees at the seat tubes, the bottom bracket drops, the suspension’s compression becomes softer and the rear wheel is able to travel through 160mm. The slacker angles, lower BB and softer but longer suspension mean the bike handles better in corners and high-speed sections.

Shifting between modes is easy once you’ve got the feel for the system. To activate DH mode, you press and hold the ShapeShifter lever and shift your weight back, pushing down with your heels before releasing the lever. To shift back to XC mode you press and hold the lever, shift your weight forwards and up, and release the lever. A green dial on the rocker tells you which mode you’re in. The system has no mid-point between modes, and the pressure in the piston can be adjusted a little to accommodate riders of different weight, or whether you want the system to fall more easily into XC of DH mode.

Side by side, dh and xc modes - the knuckle link is moved by the piston to alter the suspension's kinematics:

Side by side, DH and XC modes – the knuckle link is moved by the piston to alter the suspension’s kinematics

The other interesting shift is that Canyon now has seven different frames on offer. In the UK, we’ve been calling out for longer bikes from Canyon – in What Mountain Bike magazine’s Trail Bike of the Year awards, the shortness of Canyon’s contender held it back a touch in the standings. Canyon is now offering four standard frame sizes (S, M, L, XL) and three ‘pro’ sizes (S, M, L); the only difference is that the pro models have a longer top tube. For example, the standard medium frame has an effective top tube length of 600mm, while the Pro version has a 629mm effective top tube length.

The rest of the Strive CF’s features come as no surprise, and showcase Canyon’s usual attention to detail. The tapered steerer gives way to a down tube that holds the internally routed cables. Towards the bottom of the down tube there’s a plastic down tube protector to reduce the chance of rock-strikes damaging the frame. This is removable to give better access to the internally routed cables, which is a nice touch. It’s good to see a chainsuck plate and bolt-through rear axle too, as well as the ISCG05 chainguide mount.

The Strive CF range goes on sale today, with delivery expected in early August. The information we have suggests that the range will start at €3,699 for the Strive CF 8.0 Race (with the pro geometry), which comes with a 160mm travel Rockshox Pike RCT3 fork and a Monarch Plus RC3 Debon Air shock, a SRAM X01 groupset with RaceFace Turbine cranks, SRAM Roam 40 wheels, RockShox Reverb Stealth seatpost and a mixture of RaceFace, Ergon and Renthal finishing kit.

The top-of-the-line Strive CF 9.0 SL costs €4,999 and comes with the new 170mm Fox 36 fork, a Cane Creek DBinline shock, Shimano XTR groupset, Mavic Crossmax XL wheels and a smattering of Canyon’s own carbon finishing kit.

The bike in the gallery is the Strive CF 9.0 Race with the pro geometry, and is priced at €4,299. UK pricing for all models is to be confirmed.


Vittoria branches out into wheels – Interbike 2014

Italian tyre powerhouse Vittoria revealed a complete line of road and mountain bike wheels at Interbike that will start arriving in stores as early as next month. We’ve already requested some test samples for review, and Vittoria says racing fans will see some of the new wheels under top teams next season.

High-tech for the road

Vittoria has apparently jumped into wheel development head first, infusing much of its road range with cutting-edge features. The Qurano carbon road tubulars will be offered in 80mm, 60mm and 46/42mm depths, all with 23.5mm-wide rims that are reinforced with graphene – the newest composites w?ndermaterial that Vittoria claims yields lighter and stronger rims than conventional carbon fibre materials.

Vittoria is building its carbon fiber tubular rims with graphene-reinforced carbon fiber composites, which are supposedly stronger and lighter than conventionally built rims. external nipples will make for easier servicing, too:

Vittoria says its graphene-reinforced rims are stronger and lighter than what would otherwise be possible with conventional carbon fibre construction

All of the Qurano wheels are built with straight-pull bladed stainless steel spokes in 14/21h front/rear counts, with the rears featuring a two-to-one lacing pattern and offset spoke beds to balance tensions. Claimed weights for the Qurano 46, 60 and 84 are 1,298g, 1,409g and 1,573g, respectively.

Vittoria says that carbon clinchers are under development but in the meantime, the Fraxion will use an aluminum rim and a carbon fibre fairing and mixed 45/50mm front/rear depths to help balance aerodynamic efficiency and crosswind handling. Both rims have semi-wide 17mm internal widths intended for use with tyres up to 22mm across. Claimed weight for the set is 1,698g.

Rim shapes are fairly wide and blunted for what we anticipate should be manageable handling in crosswinds:

As compared to the all-carbon Qurano (left), the Fraxion (right) will use an aluminum/carbon hybrid rim construction to reduce costs

Riders looking for a premium all-around, all-aluminum wheelset might take interest in the Elusion Nero, which uses the same 17mm internal rim width as the Fraxion but with a shallower 26/28mm front/rear rim depth. More notably, Vittoria has treated the rim with a plasma electrolytic oxidation surface treatment – more commonly known under its trade name, Keronite – plus it’s tubeless-ready, too.

In addition to giving the Elusion Nero its characteristic all-grey look, Keronite – the same treatment Mavic uses for its Exalith rims – lends incredible durability to treated surfaces, unlike standard anodization, which is easily prone to brake pad wear. And just like Mavic, Vittoria claims its Elusion Nero rims will provide better braking performance in both wet and dry conditions.

The new vittoria elusion nero has an eye-catching all-grey finish:

We’re looking forward to riding Vittoria’s new Keronite-coated Elusion Nero clincher wheelset

Accompanying the Elusion Nero is the standard Elusion, which shares identical virtually identical specs save for the Keronite coating. Claimed weight for the Elusion Nero is 1,576g while the standard Elusion tacks on another 15g courtesy of brass spoke nipples.

All of the above wheels will be built around Vittoria’s novel SwitchIT hubs, built with cartridge bearings, oversized rear driveside spoke flanges, and interchangeable aluminum freehub bodies that can easily removed without tools. All of those models will come with wheelbags, brake pads and internal-cam skewers, too (save for the standard Elusion, which doesn’t require special pads).

Freehub bodies on the switchit hubs can be easily removed without tools - meaning that riders can also easily swap out gear ratios if they stock up on extra bodies:

No tools? No problem

For riders on more of a budget, Vittoria’s new road range will round out with two entry-level models. The Alusion will use the same 17mm internal rim width as the other clinchers but with a 33mm depth, brass spoke nipples, and more conventional hubs for a total claimed weight of 1,791g. The shallower Session, meanwhile, gets a 26mm-deep rim but is otherwise identical for a claimed weight of 1,763g.

Full collection of off-road models

Sadly, Vittoria didn’t have on hand at Interbike its flagship XC racing model – simply called Race – which will be built with a 25mm-wide, 30mm-deep graphene-reinforced carbon fibre tubular rim for a claimed weight of 1,552g in the sole 29in diameter.

That said, the more trail/enduro-oriented Deamion looked interesting enough with its 23mm-wide (internal width), 21mm-deep asymmetric and tubeless-compatible alloy rims, all laced with 28 spokes front and rear to cartridge bearing hubs that use Shimano’s Center Lock rotor interface. Claimed weight for the 27.5in version is 1,676g; the 29ers come in at 1,747g.

Vittoria will have several off-road models available, too:

Vittoria will have off-road models, too

The more XC-oriented Reaxcion shares similar specs to the Deamion but with narrower 21mm-wide (internal width) rims. Nevertheless, the switch to brass from alloy nipples keeps the claimed weights of the 27.5in and 29in version nearly identical at 1,706g and 1,787g, respectively.

Finally, there’s the entry-level Creed with 21mm-wide (internal width) rims and heavier hubsets built with steel cassette bodies. Unlike its more expensive brethren, the Creed will be offered in all three common wheel diameters with claimed weights ranging from 1,819g to 1,950g depending on size and axle configuration.

Both the deamion and reaxcion get tubeless-ready rim profiles:

All of Vittoria’s off-road clinchers feature tubeless-ready profiles

Pricing for all of Vittoria’s new wheels has not been announced.

www.vittoria.com








Vittoria branches out into wheels – Interbike 2014

Italian tyre powerhouse Vittoria revealed a complete line of road and mountain bike wheels at Interbike that will start arriving in stores as early as next month. We’ve already requested some test samples for review, and Vittoria says racing fans will see some of the new wheels under top teams next season.

High-tech for the road

Vittoria has apparently jumped into wheel development head first, infusing much of its road range with cutting-edge features. The Qurano carbon road tubulars will be offered in 80mm, 60mm and 46/42mm depths, all with 23.5mm-wide rims that are reinforced with graphene – the newest composites w?ndermaterial that Vittoria claims yields lighter and stronger rims than conventional carbon fibre materials.

Vittoria is building its carbon fiber tubular rims with graphene-reinforced carbon fiber composites, which are supposedly stronger and lighter than conventionally built rims. external nipples will make for easier servicing, too:

Vittoria says its graphene-reinforced rims are stronger and lighter than what would otherwise be possible with conventional carbon fibre construction

All of the Qurano wheels are built with straight-pull bladed stainless steel spokes in 14/21h front/rear counts, with the rears featuring a two-to-one lacing pattern and offset spoke beds to balance tensions. Claimed weights for the Qurano 46, 60 and 84 are 1,298g, 1,409g and 1,573g, respectively.

Vittoria says that carbon clinchers are under development but in the meantime, the Fraxion will use an aluminum rim and a carbon fibre fairing and mixed 45/50mm front/rear depths to help balance aerodynamic efficiency and crosswind handling. Both rims have semi-wide 17mm internal widths intended for use with tyres up to 22mm across. Claimed weight for the set is 1,698g.

Rim shapes are fairly wide and blunted for what we anticipate should be manageable handling in crosswinds:

As compared to the all-carbon Qurano (left), the Fraxion (right) will use an aluminum/carbon hybrid rim construction to reduce costs

Riders looking for a premium all-around, all-aluminum wheelset might take interest in the Elusion Nero, which uses the same 17mm internal rim width as the Fraxion but with a shallower 26/28mm front/rear rim depth. More notably, Vittoria has treated the rim with a plasma electrolytic oxidation surface treatment – more commonly known under its trade name, Keronite – plus it’s tubeless-ready, too.

In addition to giving the Elusion Nero its characteristic all-grey look, Keronite – the same treatment Mavic uses for its Exalith rims – lends incredible durability to treated surfaces, unlike standard anodization, which is easily prone to brake pad wear. And just like Mavic, Vittoria claims its Elusion Nero rims will provide better braking performance in both wet and dry conditions.

The new vittoria elusion nero has an eye-catching all-grey finish:

We’re looking forward to riding Vittoria’s new Keronite-coated Elusion Nero clincher wheelset

Accompanying the Elusion Nero is the standard Elusion, which shares identical virtually identical specs save for the Keronite coating. Claimed weight for the Elusion Nero is 1,576g while the standard Elusion tacks on another 15g courtesy of brass spoke nipples.

All of the above wheels will be built around Vittoria’s novel SwitchIT hubs, built with cartridge bearings, oversized rear driveside spoke flanges, and interchangeable aluminum freehub bodies that can easily removed without tools. All of those models will come with wheelbags, brake pads and internal-cam skewers, too (save for the standard Elusion, which doesn’t require special pads).

Freehub bodies on the switchit hubs can be easily removed without tools - meaning that riders can also easily swap out gear ratios if they stock up on extra bodies:

No tools? No problem

For riders on more of a budget, Vittoria’s new road range will round out with two entry-level models. The Alusion will use the same 17mm internal rim width as the other clinchers but with a 33mm depth, brass spoke nipples, and more conventional hubs for a total claimed weight of 1,791g. The shallower Session, meanwhile, gets a 26mm-deep rim but is otherwise identical for a claimed weight of 1,763g.

Full collection of off-road models

Sadly, Vittoria didn’t have on hand at Interbike its flagship XC racing model – simply called Race – which will be built with a 25mm-wide, 30mm-deep graphene-reinforced carbon fibre tubular rim for a claimed weight of 1,552g in the sole 29in diameter.

That said, the more trail/enduro-oriented Deamion looked interesting enough with its 23mm-wide (internal width), 21mm-deep asymmetric and tubeless-compatible alloy rims, all laced with 28 spokes front and rear to cartridge bearing hubs that use Shimano’s Center Lock rotor interface. Claimed weight for the 27.5in version is 1,676g; the 29ers come in at 1,747g.

Vittoria will have several off-road models available, too:

Vittoria will have off-road models, too

The more XC-oriented Reaxcion shares similar specs to the Deamion but with narrower 21mm-wide (internal width) rims. Nevertheless, the switch to brass from alloy nipples keeps the claimed weights of the 27.5in and 29in version nearly identical at 1,706g and 1,787g, respectively.

Finally, there’s the entry-level Creed with 21mm-wide (internal width) rims and heavier hubsets built with steel cassette bodies. Unlike its more expensive brethren, the Creed will be offered in all three common wheel diameters with claimed weights ranging from 1,819g to 1,950g depending on size and axle configuration.

Both the deamion and reaxcion get tubeless-ready rim profiles:

All of Vittoria’s off-road clinchers feature tubeless-ready profiles

Pricing for all of Vittoria’s new wheels has not been announced.

www.vittoria.com








New Challenge Baby Limus cyclocross tyre ready to hit the mud

Just in time for ‘cross season comes a new Baby Limus tyre from Challenge. Although the name suggests that it’s just a downsized version of the company’s Limus full-mud tyre, the progressive tread design looks to be far more versatile – and faster to boot.

The Baby Limus does indeed borrow the Y-shaped knob concept from the Limus, along with the same 2.2mm-tall, aggressive cornering knobs that make the Limus so predictably grippy in slippery conditions. However, the Baby Limus’ center tread is much more tightly spaced with half-height knobs for a faster roll on harder surfaces.

While the cornering knobs are 2.2mm tall, the center tread is just 1.1mm high with the intermediate knobs falling in between:

Challenge builds the new Baby Limus with a progressive tread design that features shorter knobs down the middle and taller ones on the sides

Meanwhile, the transition tread uses U-shaped knobs that are in between the center and shoulder blocks in terms of knob height, and they’re spaced more evenly on the casing than on the Limus.

According to Challenge’s Morgan Nicol, the Baby Limus should provide similar cornering performance but faster straight-ahead speed than the Limus but a more predictable behavior than the semi-slick Chicane for what should be the most versatile model in the company’s cyclocross lineup for this season.

Challenge's new baby limus tire looks to be an excellent all-rounder with tall and well-supported cornering knobs like the standard limus but a half-height and tightly packed center tread that should roll much faster, especially on harder surfaces:

The lower center knob heights and more densely packed knob spacing should make the Baby Limus much faster rolling than the standard Limus

Challenge has several Baby Limus models already shipping, including the Team Edition tubular with a 320tpi polycotton casing, the Pro tubular with a so-called ‘SuperPoly’ casing, and an open tubular, all with 33mm widths.

Also new from Challenge is the MTB Two tubular mountain bike tyre, which features a much more stoutly reinforced knob pattern than the original MTB One for what we anticipate will be more predictable cornering manners but with similarly low rolling resistance and suppleness.

Also new from challenge is the mtb two tubular mountain bike tire, which features what looks to be a much more useful and versatile tread than the mtb one:

Love mountain bike tubulars? Challenge now has the new MTB Two, which looks to offer substantially improved grip over the original MTB One model








Twin Six launching bike line at Interbike

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (BRAIN) — Apparel brand Twin Six will is getting into the bike business, with four new frames it will debut next week at Interbike.

Cube 2015 range highlights – video

Cube’s 2015 range is headlined by the company’s new C68 carbon, which uses a 68:32 carbon to resin ratio compared to the standard 60:40 split, achieved by changing the lay-up of the fibres to create a lighter frame.

This new material can be seen on the top of the range Stereo 140 C68 SLT full-sus 650b mountain bike as well as across the top four models in the company’s pro-level Litening road bike range.

On the budget side of things, Cube has launched a full Shimano Claris-equipped version of its aluminium Peloton road machine as well as updating its women’s and kid’s ranges, which now includes the 24-inch wheeled, air suspension and disc-brake specced Kid 240 SL.

Check out the full Cube 2015 range in the video below and view all our videos at the BikeRadar YouTube page.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content








Cube 2015 range highlights – video

Cube’s 2015 range is headlined by the company’s new C68 carbon, which uses a 68:32 carbon to resin ratio compared to the standard 60:40 split, achieved by changing the lay-up of the fibres to create a lighter frame.

This new material can be seen on the top of the range Stereo 140 C68 SLT full-sus 650b mountain bike as well as across the top four models in the company’s pro-level Litening road bike range.

On the budget side of things, Cube has launched a full Shimano Claris-equipped version of its aluminium Peloton road machine as well as updating its women’s and kid’s ranges, which now includes the 24-inch wheeled, air suspension and disc-brake specced Kid 240 SL.

Check out the full Cube 2015 range in the video below and view all our videos at the BikeRadar YouTube page.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content