shimano

Kona Zing review

The US/Canadian outfit Kona’s origins lie in the mountain bike boom of the late 1980s, but it also produces cyclo-cross bikes, classic steel bikes, tourers and road machines. The Zing is its least expensive aluminium bike.

  • Highs: Fine handling from a well-finished aluminium frame
  • Lows: Basic wheels and average kit don’t shine against the opposition
  • Buy if: You’re looking for a quality aluminium frame and are prepared to upgrade later

The Zing’s kit doesn’t hit the level of some of its peers. Its Tiagra groupset is upgraded to a 105 rear mech, to catch your eye in the showroom, with FSA supplying a compact Vero chainset. The budget wheels comes from Shimano, its basic but tough R501s.

The highlight of the Zing is the attention-grabbing, well-finished aluminium frame, which is paired with a Deda carbon fork. In fact, it looks so striking that our security guard took a picture of it for a cyclist friend before we went out on our first test ride. The frame may have a relaxed head tube, but its steep seat tube lends it a bit more aggression – though racier ambitions will be slowed by its modest wheelset and a wheelbase that’s more than a metre long. The frame has internal cabling, but because of its position the cable barrel adjuster for the rear mech does catch on the front brake when you turn the bar. A little thing, but slightly annoying.

Other contemporary features include the oversized down tube, a top tube that narrows as it nears the seat tube and moderately sized seatstays. The efficient pedalling through the lower part of the frame and decent comfort through the top – aided by 25mm Continental tyres – mean the bike should have pretty wide-ranging appeal. The compact chainset and 12-28 cassette are a pretty good combination too, unless you’re racing. But for any rolling route or steeper hills you’ll be glad of that 28-tooth sprocket.

The kit is all fine, if not inspiring. Shimano’s usual cup and cone hubs are serviceable by the home mechanic, and though the Tektro calliper brakes are pretty basic, upgrading to cartridge blocks is a straightforward job. But we feel that a frameset of this quality deserves better.

There’s a lot to like about the Kona, but it’s heavy among its peer group – more than half a kilo heavier than Boardman’s Team Carbon and a whole kilo more than the Rose Pro SL 2000. This weight and the longish wheelbase contribute to a sweet-handling, comfortable bike, but for a machine calling itself the ‘Zing’ it lacks sharpness. And you really do need to upgrade the Shimano entry-level wheels to make the most of the eye-catching frame, which we found to be never short of admirers.

This article was originally published in Cycling Plus magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.








Giant Trance SX review

The SX, as the big brother of Giant’s regular Trance trail bike, gets the long fork, single ring and chain device treatment, but there’s still work to do to make it ready to riot.

Highs: Versatile light frame and wheels, longer travel adjust fork, cost effective workhorse Shimano stop/go equipment

Lows: Lumpy fork and narrow bars, soft feeling back end

Frame and equipment: no wide-boy

Even before the 140mm Trance all-rounder was officially announced we spotted Giant’s sponsored enduro athletes – including Adam Craig – running 160mm forks in new prototypes. The final SX backs up its bigger Fox 34 fork with Shimano’s excellent tough and light – yet rarely seen – Zee single-ring cranks, a Shimano SLX/Deore gear mix, an MRP G3 chain guide, a reworked Contact Switch dropper post and fatter tyres.

The one essential control-increasing modification it hasn’t received is obvious right away. At 725mm, the narrow Giant Connect SL bars are low on leverage and you’re forced to work harder through narrow elbows to show the trail who’s boss. The 70mm stem is okay, but finding a shorter model is complicated by the fork’s unusual steerer – it’s Giant’s Overdrive 2 format, which slims to 1.25in at the top. Standard steerers are 1.125in.

Ride and handling: upfront accuracy ?

Bigger bars won’t cost much, at least, and otherwise the front end is impressively stiff and accurate for a lightweight chassis. We’ve been running our Trance long-termer with various 160mm forks for months without any side effects.

The longer fork extends the front-centre, usefully moving the rider further back on what can otherwise feel a forward-weighted bike. It also stabilises the wheelbase at speed, and you can drop the TALAS travel adjust fork to a ‘normal’ 140mm for climbing.

While it’s a downer on most bikes, Fox’s stiff Evolution damping in the shock stops the rear end feeling too mushy. It’s the same story (only without the happy ending) with the Evolution-damped fork, which needs a retune to release its mid stroke.

The evo fork definitely needs a retune to release its mid stroke: the evo fork definitely needs a retune to release its mid stroke

The Evo fork definitely needs a retune to release its mid stroke

That single front-ring causes less pedalling bob than a double does with the remapped Maestro linkage suspension, and combined with a super-fast Schwalbe Rock Razor rear tyre and light, broad, tubeless-ready Giant P-TRX1 wheels, it means acceleration and pedalling performance are very keen.

There’s still a fair old thump from the back if you push it deeper into its travel at high speed, and it can feel like it’s dragging behind you rather than driving you forward unless it’s really well tuned. There’s also flex through the long lower linkage that curves over the bottom bracket, the scooped out rocker linkages and the skinny thru-axle dropouts. That’s a reminder you’re on a toughened-up trail bike rather than a ground up enduro machine as you push hard through corners.

Its suspension and cockpit limitations mean the SX feels closer to the edge of control than heavier bikes when you’re really hammering, but then it climbs and cruises more easily too.

This article was originally published as part of?What Mountain Bike magazine’s Trail Bike of the year awards. What Mountain Bike is available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.








Felt 2015 road and cyclocross bikes launched

Make no mistake about it, disc brakes for endurance road bikes and cyclocross rigs are coming in a big way. For 2015, Felt has a slew of disc-brake-equipped machines, from thru-axle fork models on ’cross frames to the Z2 Disc endurance road bike with Shimano’s Ultegra Di2 and hydraulic R785 brakes.

Felt Z2 Disc

On the whole, bike industry brands have settled on ‘race’ and ‘endurance’ as the two primary categories of road bikes, with the latter having more upright, relaxed and longer geometry than the former. For this category, Specialized has the Roubaix, Cannondale has the Synapse, BMC has the GranFondo and Felt has the Z Series. As with others of its genre, the Z2 Disc has a relatively taller head tube (180mm on a 56cm, for example) and stable handling with 50mm of rake (the forward sweep of the fork) and a longish wheelbase (1012mm for a 56cm).

The Z2 Disc will be available at the end of this year dressed in Shimano’s Ultegra Di2 electronic drivetrain and R785 hydraulic brakes.

The hydraulic hose on the 2015 felt road and cyclocross bikes runs through the fork. the z2 disc features 140mm post mount disc tabs: the hydraulic hose on the 2015 felt road and cyclocross bikes runs through the fork. the z2 disc features 140mm post mount disc tabs

The Z2 Disc features 140mm post mount disc tabs

While many of the very first road bikes to use Di2 or hydraulic brakes did so by crudely strapping —?or even zip-tying —?external lines, most current bikes use clean internal routing. The Felt Z2 Disc even tucks the front hydraulic hose into the carbon fork, which features 140mm post mount disc tabs. (Rotor size was heavily debated in the industry for road bikes, with some early proponents arguing that 160mm was needed for stopping power.)

The Z2 Disc will be available in five sizes, from 51-61cm for US$6,199-$6,499. (UK pricing was not immediately available.)

Felt Fx Series cyclocross bikes

Felt has a whopping nine cyclocross models for 2015, with all but the least-expensive (and aluminum) F95x and the junior F24x bikes coming with disc brakes. Five of the Fx bikes will have tubeless-ready wheels. Perhaps the biggest news, though, is the fork on F2x and F3x —?as with many mountain bikes these days, these two models feature thru-axles instead of the traditional quick-release axle for better torsional rigidity.

While many have acknowledged that thru-axles are a great idea on a cyclocross bike, only a few, such as Giant, have actually produced it. Felt uses a 15mm thru-axle, plus 140mm post-mount disc tabs, on its top two complete bikes. The others in the line have standard quick releases.

The F1x is Felt’s top cyclocross model, but it will be sold as a frameset only. The “pistachio” colored F2x is the top complete bike, which will go for US$5,499-$5,999. As with the Z2 Disc, the F2x gets the Shimano Ultegra Di2 drivetrain with R785 hydraulic brakes.?

The f2x is the top-end bike. it will be sold as a frameset:

The colorful F2x will come in six sizes, from 47 to 60cm

The F4x will get SRAM’s new CX1 one-by cyclocross group. The CX1 partial group was launched earlier this year, taking cues from SRAM’s XX1 mountain bike group with a clutch derailleur that keeps the chain taut, no matter how rough the terrain. (As a plus for riders looking to upgrade a current bike, the rear derailleur and required chainring work with all 10- and 11-speed existing SRAM levers.)


2015 Felt road and cyclocross bikes launched

Make no mistake about it, disc brakes for endurance road bikes and cyclocross rigs are coming in a big way. For 2015, Felt has a slew of disc-brake-equipped machines, from thru-axle fork models on ’cross frames to the Z2 Disc endurance road bike with Shimano’s Ultegra Di2 and hydraulic R785 brakes.

Felt Z2 Disc

On the whole, bike industry brands have settled on ‘race’ and ‘endurance’ as the two primary categories of road bikes, with the latter having more upright, relaxed and longer geometry than the former. For this category, Specialized has the Roubaix, Cannondale has the Synapse, BMC has the GranFondo and Felt has the Z Series. As with others of its genre, the Z2 Disc has a relatively taller head tube (180mm on a 56cm, for example) and stable handling with 50mm of rake (the forward sweep of the fork) and a longish wheelbase (1012mm for a 56cm).

The Z2 Disc will be available at the end of this year dressed in Shimano’s Ultegra Di2 electronic drivetrain and R785 hydraulic brakes.

While many of the very first road bikes to use Di2 or hydraulic brakes did so by crudely strapping —?or even zip-tying —?external lines, most current bikes use clean internal routing. The Felt Z2 Disc even tucks the front hydraulic hose into the carbon fork, which features 140mm post mount disc tabs. (Rotor size was heavily debated in the industry for road bikes, with some early proponents arguing that 160mm was needed for stopping power.)

The Z2 Disc will be available in five sizes, from 51-61cm for US$6,199-$6,499. (UK pricing was not immediately available.)

Felt Fx Series cyclocross bikes

Felt has a whopping nine cyclocross models for 2015, with all but the least-expensive (and aluminum) F95x and the junior F24x bikes coming with disc brakes. Five of the Fx bikes will have tubeless-ready wheels. Perhaps the biggest news, though, is the fork on F2x and F3x —?as with many mountain bikes these days, these two models feature thru axles instead of the traditional quick release axle for better torsional rigidity.

While many have acknowledged the thru-axle as being a great idea on a cyclocross bike, only a few like Giant have actually produced it. Felt uses a 15mm thru-axle, plus 140mm post-mount disc tabs, on its top two complete bikes. The others in the line have standard quick releases.

The F1x is Felt’s top cyclocross model, but it will be sold as a frameset only. The “pistachio” colored F2x is the top complete bike, which will go for US$5,499-$5,999. As with the Z2 Disc, the F2x gets the Shimano Ultegra Di2 drivetrain with R785 hydraulic brakes.?

The f2x is the top-end bike. it will be sold as a frameset:

The colorful F2x will come in six sizes, from 47-60cm

The F4x will get SRAM’s new CX1 one-by cyclocross group. The CX1 partial group was launched earlier this year, taking cues from SRAM’s XX1 mountain bike group with a clutch derailleur that keeps the chain taut, no matter how rough the terrain. (As a plus for riders looking to upgrade a current bike, the rear derailleur and required chainring work with all 10- and 11-speed existing SRAM levers.)








2015 Felt road and cyclocross bikes launched

Make no mistake about it, disc brakes for endurance road bikes and cyclocross rigs are coming in a big way. For 2015, Felt has a slew of disc-brake-equipped machines, from thru-axle fork models on ’cross frames to the Z2 Disc endurance road bike with Shimano’s Ultegra Di2 and hydraulic R785 brakes.

Felt Z2 Disc

On the whole, bike industry brands have settled on ‘race’ and ‘endurance’ as the two primary categories of road bikes, with the latter having more upright, relaxed and longer geometry than the former. For this category, Specialized has the Roubaix, Cannondale has the Synapse, BMC has the GranFondo and Felt has the Z Series. As with others of its genre, the Z2 Disc has a relatively taller head tube (180mm on a 56cm, for example) and stable handling with 50mm of rake (the forward sweep of the fork) and a longish wheelbase (1012mm for a 56cm).

The Z2 Disc will be available at the end of this year dressed in Shimano’s Ultegra Di2 electronic drivetrain and R785 hydraulic brakes.

While many of the very first road bikes to use Di2 or hydraulic brakes did so by crudely strapping —?or even zip-tying —?external lines, most current bikes use clean internal routing. The Felt Z2 Disc even tucks the front hydraulic hose into the carbon fork, which features 140mm post mount disc tabs. (Rotor size was heavily debated in the industry for road bikes, with some early proponents arguing that 160mm was needed for stopping power.)

The Z2 Disc will be available in five sizes, from 51-61cm for US$6,199-$6,499. (UK pricing was not immediately available.)

Felt Fx Series cyclocross bikes

Felt has a whopping nine cyclocross models for 2015, with all but the least-expensive (and aluminum) F95x and the junior F24x bikes coming with disc brakes. Five of the Fx bikes will have tubeless-ready wheels. Perhaps the biggest news, though, is the fork on F2x and F3x —?as with many mountain bikes these days, these two models feature thru axles instead of the traditional quick release axle for better torsional rigidity.

While many have acknowledged the thru-axle as being a great idea on a cyclocross bike, only a few like Giant have actually produced it. Felt uses a 15mm thru-axle, plus 140mm post-mount disc tabs, on its top two complete bikes. The others in the line have standard quick releases.

The F1x is Felt’s top cyclocross model, but it will be sold as a frameset only. The “pistachio” colored F2x is the top complete bike, which will go for US$5,499-$5,999. As with the Z2 Disc, the F2x gets the Shimano Ultegra Di2 drivetrain with R785 hydraulic brakes.?

The f2x is the top-end bike. it will be sold as a frameset:

The colorful F2x will come in six sizes, from 47-60cm

The F4x will get SRAM’s new CX1 one-by cyclocross group. The CX1 partial group was launched earlier this year, taking cues from SRAM’s XX1 mountain bike group with a clutch derailleur that keeps the chain taut, no matter how rough the terrain. (As a plus for riders looking to upgrade a current bike, the rear derailleur and required chainring work with all 10- and 11-speed existing SRAM levers.)








Shimano XTR M9000 11-speed groupset – first look

Shimano has today released details of the latest version of its top-tier XTR mountain bike groupset. After three years of development, XTR M9000 has arrived in the form of an extremely versatile 11-speed group that’ll be available in single-, double- and triple-ring configurations.

Shimano has continued with what it calls its ‘rider tuned concept’ which, once you remove the marketing spiel, translates to providing components for specific riding disciplines.?

FC-M9000 and FC-M9020 chainsets

XTR’s new style chainset will be available in two options – the FC-9000, a lightweight chainset designed for cross-country race use, and the more durable FC-M9020 Trail chainset.

The XC Race chainset can accept one or two chainrings but will not accept three rings. The crankset features a unique hollow-bonded construction, the result of which is a 640g complete claimed weight (excluding bottom bracket).

This chainset also features a unique Q-factor that at 158mm is a full 10mm narrower than that of the Trail version. The idea is to offer improved pedalling efficiency for racers. The teeth of the XTR chainrings are made from titanium and reinforced with a carbon fibre structure. The Race version has cut-outs to the teeth of the outer chainring.

The Trail version of the chainset is cold forged and goes without the hollow-bonding of the Race version, gaining additional strength along with a weight penalty.

The chainset can accept a single-, double- or triple- ring setup, with blanking tabs being used to cover the holes left for double or single configurations.

For those seeking a 1x setup, the dedicated chainring features retention technology with a unique tooth profile that claims to eliminate the need for chain retention devices.

Shimano fc-m9000 and fc-m9020 chainsets:

Both the M9000 and M9020 chainsets use Shimano’s Hollowtech II bottom bracket standard, two current bottom brackets will be standard fit, one for regular threaded BBs (SM-BB93) and one for press-fit BBs (SM-BB94-41A).

Gearing options

FC-M9000 XC Race chainset

  • 2x: 34-24T, 36-26T, 38-28T
  • 1x: 30T, 32T, 34T, 36T

FC-M9020 Trail chainset

  • 3x: 40-30-22T
  • 2x: 34-24T, 36-26T, 38-28T
  • 1x: 30T, 32T, 34T, 36T

Shimano will also continue to produce its FC-M980 10-speed chainset in all common sizes and gear configurations.

CS-M9000 cassette

Shimano cs-m9000 11-speed cassette: shimano cs-m9000 11-speed cassette

Shimano’s all-new wide-ratio 11-speed XTR cassette is available in one option only and features an 11-40t range. The gear ratios are spread follows: 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-27-31-35-40. The cassette spider is constructed from carbon fibre and mounts a combination of aluminium, steel and titanium cogs. The cassette is compatible with all current Shimano freehubs.

CN-HG900-11 chain

CN-HG900-11 chain: cn-hg900-11 chain

A new cassette means a new chain, so Shimano is introducing a new premium 11-speed chain. The CN-HG900-11 uses a HG-X11 special asymmetric plate design and Shimano’s new SIL-TEC surface treatment. Shimano claim a 60 percent reduction in friction and a 30 percent improvement in the chain’s ability to shed mud.

RD-M9000 rear derailleur

Shimano rd-m9000 rear derailleur: shimano rd-m9000 rear derailleur

The new XTR rear derailleur features an even lower profile than previous Shadow models. This profile also optimises the slant angle of the component which lowers shifting effort and improves stability. The new Shadow RD+ clutch retention system has a simpler, external clutch adjustment. The derailleur will be available in a G/S version for single/double setups and a longer SGS long cage version for triple transmissions.

BR-M9000 brakes

Shimano xtr br-m9000 brakes:

Like the chainset, XTR’s brakes are divided into XC Race and Trail versions. The Race version features a magnesium calliper and lever body along with a carbon lever blade and titanium hardware. The trail version is 25 percent more powerful than the race version and uses an alloy lever with a carbon overlay. Both brakes also benefit from pistons and pad backings that use a glass fibre phenolic coating. This insulation material gives a claimed ten percent improvement in heat resistance.

The brakes are also compatible with Shimano’s new I-spec II attachment standard, which now allows the height of the brake lever and shifter to be adjusted independently.

ST-M9000 shifters

Shimano xtr sl-m9000 shifters:

XTR M9000’s shift levers can be used to perform single or multiple shifts in one action. As you’d expect they also?use Shimano’s two-way release system, so riders can change gears using just a thumb or a thumb and forefinger. The internal workings also ensure that every single shift feels identical. XTR now gets the same polymer-coated inner gear cables as Shimano’s top end Dura-Ace road groupset, the result is a claimed 20 percent reduction in shifter effort when compared with current XTR shifters.?

FD-M9000 front derailleur

Shimano fd-m9000 front derailleur:

XTR M9000 debuts a new front derailleur design for Shimano, known as the sideswing. It is said to offer 100 percent more powerful outward shifting, along with less noise and 15mm more tyre clearance when compared with previous XTR. Imagine turning a conventional front derailleur 90 degrees and mounting it sideways, that’s the orientation of sideswing. It’s not all good news though, this design requires unique cable routing that follows the down tube and goes directly into the front derailleur, which won’t be possible on all frames. A conventional front derailleur will also be available for incompatible frames.

XTR M9000 wheelset

Shimano wh-m9000-tl wheelset:

Shimano will be producing an entirely new XTR mountain bike wheelset in 27.5 and 29in sizes. The rims will debut Shimano’s carbon laminate rim technology for mountain bike applications and will also get a new lightweight bearing and axle system. Details are still scarce on these but we have heard to expect a cross-country version with a 20mm internal rim width along with a wider 24mm trail version, both featuring 28 spokes front and rear.?








Shimano XTR M9000 11-speed groupset – first look

Shimano has today released details of the latest version of its top-tier XTR mountain bike groupset. After three years of development, XTR M9000 has arrived in the form of an extremely versatile 11-speed group that’ll be available in single-, double- and triple-ring configurations.

Shimano has continued with what it calls its ‘rider tuned concept’ which, once you remove the marketing spiel, translates to providing components for specific riding disciplines.?

FC-M9000 and FC-M9020 chainsets

XTR’s new style chainset will be available in two options – the FC-9000, a lightweight chainset designed for cross-country race use, and the more durable FC-M9020 Trail chainset.

The XC Race chainset can accept one or two chainrings but will not accept three rings. The crankset features a unique hollow-bonded construction, the result of which is a 640g complete claimed weight (excluding bottom bracket).

This chainset also features a unique Q-factor that at 158mm is a full 10mm narrower than that of the Trail version. The idea is to offer improved pedalling efficiency for racers. The teeth of the XTR chainrings are made from titanium and reinforced with a carbon fibre structure. The Race version has cut-outs to the teeth of the outer chainring.

The Trail version of the chainset is cold forged and goes without the hollow-bonding of the Race version, gaining additional strength along with a weight penalty.

The chainset can accept a single-, double- or triple- ring setup, with blanking tabs being used to cover the holes left for double or single configurations.

For those seeking a 1x setup, the dedicated chainring features retention technology with a unique tooth profile that claims to eliminate the need for chain retention devices.

Shimano fc-m9000 and fc-m9020 chainsets:

Both the M9000 and M9020 chainsets use Shimano’s Hollowtech II bottom bracket standard, two current bottom brackets will be standard fit, one for regular threaded BBs (SM-BB93) and one for press-fit BBs (SM-BB94-41A).

Gearing options

FC-M9000 XC Race chainset

  • 2x: 34-24T, 36-26T, 38-28T
  • 1x: 30T, 32T, 34T, 36T

FC-M9020 Trail chainset

  • 3x: 40-30-22T
  • 2x: 34-24T, 36-26T, 38-28T
  • 1x: 30T, 32T, 34T, 36T

Shimano will also continue to produce its FC-M980 10-speed chainset in all common sizes and gear configurations.

CS-M9000 cassette

Shimano cs-m9000 11-speed cassette: shimano cs-m9000 11-speed cassette

Shimano’s all-new wide-ratio 11-speed XTR cassette is available in one option only and features an 11-40t range. The gear ratios are spread follows: 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-27-31-35-40. The cassette spider is constructed from carbon fibre and mounts a combination of aluminium, steel and titanium cogs. The cassette is compatible with all current Shimano freehubs.

CN-HG900-11 chain

CN-HG900-11 chain: cn-hg900-11 chain

A new cassette means a new chain, so Shimano is introducing a new premium 11-speed chain. The CN-HG900-11 uses a HG-X11 special asymmetric plate design and Shimano’s new SIL-TEC surface treatment. Shimano claim a 60 percent reduction in friction and a 30 percent improvement in the chain’s ability to shed mud.

RD-M9000 rear derailleur

Shimano rd-m9000 rear derailleur: shimano rd-m9000 rear derailleur

The new XTR rear derailleur features an even lower profile than previous Shadow models. This profile also optimises the slant angle of the component which lowers shifting effort and improves stability. The new Shadow RD+ clutch retention system has a simpler, external clutch adjustment. The derailleur will be available in a G/S version for single/double setups and a longer SGS long cage version for triple transmissions.

BR-M9000 brakes

Shimano xtr br-m9000 brakes:

Like the chainset, XTR’s brakes are divided into XC Race and Trail versions. The Race version features a magnesium calliper and lever body along with a carbon lever blade and titanium hardware. The trail version is 25 percent more powerful than the race version and uses an alloy lever with a carbon overlay. Both brakes also benefit from pistons and pad backings that use a glass fibre phenolic coating. This insulation material gives a claimed ten percent improvement in heat resistance.

The brakes are also compatible with Shimano’s new I-spec II attachment standard, which now allows the height of the brake lever and shifter to be adjusted independently.

ST-M9000 shifters

Shimano xtr sl-m9000 shifters:

XTR M9000’s shift levers can be used to perform single or multiple shifts in one action. As you’d expect they also?use Shimano’s two-way release system, so riders can change gears using just a thumb or a thumb and forefinger. The internal workings also ensure that every single shift feels identical. XTR now gets the same polymer-coated inner gear cables as Shimano’s top end Dura-Ace road groupset, the result is a claimed 20 percent reduction in shifter effort when compared with current XTR shifters.?

FD-M9000 front derailleur

Shimano fd-m9000 front derailleur:

XTR M9000 debuts a new front derailleur design for Shimano, known as the sideswing. It is said to offer 100 percent more powerful outward shifting, along with less noise and 15mm more tyre clearance when compared with previous XTR. Imagine turning a conventional front derailleur 90 degrees and mounting it sideways, that’s the orientation of sideswing. It’s not all good news though, this design requires unique cable routing that follows the down tube and goes directly into the front derailleur, which won’t be possible on all frames. A conventional front derailleur will also be available for incompatible frames.

XTR M9000 wheelset

Shimano wh-m9000-tl wheelset:

Shimano will be producing an entirely new XTR mountain bike wheelset in 27.5 and 29in sizes. The rims will debut Shimano’s carbon laminate rim technology for mountain bike applications and will also get a new lightweight bearing and axle system. Details are still scarce on these but we have heard to expect a cross-country version with a 20mm internal rim width along with a wider 24mm trail version, both featuring 28 spokes front and rear.?








Shimano 105 5800 2014/15 groupset – first look

Shimano has released details of its all new 105 groupset. Revamped for 2014/15, the drivetrain is now 11-speed, with all components gaining trickle down technology from the company’s existing Ultegra and Dura-Ace groups.

Importantly, the new 105 can also be combined with Shimano’s recently announced, second generation hydraulic disc brake for road bikes – in a system that debuts mechanical shifting with hydraulic braking for the company.

FC-5800_L_53-39_01: fc-5800_l_53-39_01

FC-5800 chainset

There are several chainset options for the new 105 including the FC-5800, a new four-arm Hollowtech II design similar to that of current Ultegra and Dura-Ace. it’s stiffer and lighter than the five-arm design it replaces, and Shimano has reinforced construction around the chainring area to further improve the stiffness to weight ratio.?The chainset uses the same bolt circle diameter for compact and traditional double chainsets, which means one crankarm fits all chainring sizes.

Gearing options are as follows: 50-34t, 52-36t or 53-39t, and both black and silver colour options will be available. The crankset can be used with Shimano’s SM-BBR60 bottom bracket or, should your frame require it, the SM-BB72-41B press-fit bottom bracket.

Shimano will also continue to produce five-arm Hollowtech II chainsets in all popular gear combinations for the 105 group. Crank length options will be 165mm, 170mm, 172.5mm and 175mm.

ST-5800 dual control shift levers

ST-5800_R_L_0:

105 now gains the light yet positive shift action found in Dura-Ace and Ultegra levers; there’s also a new compact shape that’s borrowed from the the levers of Shimano’s more expensive groups. The lever can adjusted to accommodate different hand sizes via a 10mm screw-type reach adjustment. Polymer coated cables are now standard.

FD-5800 front derailleur

FD-5800_F_L_:

The new 5800 front derailleur has a longer link arm and a new spring mechanism when compared with the last generation component.

RD-5800 rear derailleur

RD-5800-SS_L:

Shimano has included a new spring mechanism and cable pitch in the latest 105 rear derailleur, said to provide robust adjustability. Both SS (short) and GS (long) options will be available, with the latter being compatible with a 32t cassette.

BR-5800 caliper brakes

BR-5800_L:

105’s has taken a step up to a new symmetrical dual pivot caliper design, with a higher arch allowing clearance for up to a 28c tyre. The result is a claimed 10% increase in power. Direct mount versions will also be available (BR-5810-F/R).

CS-5800 cassette

CS-5800_STD_11-28T_01:

105’s 11-speed cassette is offered in three flavours providing the following ratios: 11-25t, 11-28t and 11-32t. Each choice uses close ratios that Shimano say?optimise rhythm and cadence control.

CN-HG600-11 Chain

CN-HG600-11_STD:

The new CN-HG600 11-speed chain uses Shimano’s low friction surface treatment known as Sil-Tec. It’s a PTFE surface coating that reduces friction while boosting durability. The technology first debuted a couple of years back on Shimano’s flagship Dura-Ace 9000 chain.

Hydraulic disc compatibility

Shimano st-rs685 lever, br-rs785 caliper and sm-rt99 rotor:

The big news is that Shimano has now expanded hydraulic disc technology to work with a mechanical drivetrain rather than the Di2-only previous components. This has been achieved by the company introducing the?ST-RS685, a new dual-control lever that houses 11-speed shifting internals alongside the guts of Shimano’s hydraulic brake. The 11-speed shifter can be paired with the drivetrain of?Shimano’s Dura-Ace and Ultegra mechanical groups as well as this latest version of 105.

Both the ST-RS685 shifter and the new BR-RS785 hydraulic disc brake will remain a non-series component, meaning they won’t belong to a particular product group such as Ultegra or Dura-Ace.

Flat handlebar shifter?

SL-RS700_R_L:

Shimano has decided to offer another non-series component that builds on the versatility of the 105 group: a pair of 11-speed flat bar shifters. These should provide a decent option for manufacturers or individuals looking for premium shifting on flat bar hybrids without having to resort to often overbuilt mountain bike components. Once again these parts will work with Shimano’s Dura-Ace and Ultegra mechanical .

PD-5800 Pedals

PD-5800_L:

Details are scarce on 105’s new pedals at the moment, but we are expecting to see both carbon and resin versions available – the former shaving 50g over the current alloy models at 285g.

The groupset will be available in black and silver options with stock expected from June 2014.


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Shimano 105 5800 2014/15 groupset – first look

Shimano has released details of its all new 105 groupset. Revamped for 2014/15, the drivetrain is now 11-speed, with all components gaining trickle down technology from the company’s existing Ultegra and Dura-Ace groups.

Importantly, the new 105 can also be combined with Shimano’s recently announced, second generation hydraulic disc brake for road bikes – in a system that debuts mechanical shifting with hydraulic braking for the company.

FC-5800_L_53-39_01: fc-5800_l_53-39_01

FC-5800 chainset

There are several chainset options for the new 105 including the FC-5800, a new four-arm Hollowtech II design similar to that of current Ultegra and Dura-Ace. it’s stiffer and lighter than the five-arm design it replaces, and Shimano has reinforced construction around the chainring area to further improve the stiffness to weight ratio.?The chainset uses the same bolt circle diameter for compact and traditional double chainsets, which means one crankarm fits all chainring sizes.

Gearing options are as follows: 50-34t, 52-36t or 53-39t, and both black and silver colour options will be available. The crankset can be used with Shimano’s SM-BBR60 bottom bracket or, should your frame require it, the SM-BB72-41B press-fit bottom bracket.

Shimano will also continue to produce five-arm Hollowtech II chainsets in all popular gear combinations for the 105 group. Crank length options will be 165mm, 170mm, 172.5mm and 175mm.

ST-5800 dual control shift levers

ST-5800_R_L_0:

105 now gains the light yet positive shift action found in Dura-Ace and Ultegra levers; there’s also a new compact shape that’s borrowed from the the levers of Shimano’s more expensive groups. The lever can adjusted to accommodate different hand sizes via a 10mm screw-type reach adjustment. Polymer coated cables are now standard.

FD-5800 front derailleur

FD-5800_F_L_:

The new 5800 front derailleur has a longer link arm and a new spring mechanism when compared with the last generation component.

RD-5800 rear derailleur

RD-5800-SS_L:

Shimano has included a new spring mechanism and cable pitch in the latest 105 rear derailleur, said to provide robust adjustability. Both SS (short) and GS (long) options will be available, with the latter being compatible with a 32t cassette.

BR-5800 caliper brakes

BR-5800_L:

105’s has taken a step up to a new symmetrical dual pivot caliper design, with a higher arch allowing clearance for up to a 28c tyre. The result is a claimed 10% increase in power. Direct mount versions will also be available (BR-5810-F/R).

CS-5800 cassette

CS-5800_STD_11-28T_01:

105’s 11-speed cassette is offered in three flavours providing the following ratios: 11-25t, 11-28t and 11-32t. Each choice uses close ratios that Shimano say?optimise rhythm and cadence control.

CN-HG600-11 Chain

CN-HG600-11_STD:

The new CN-HG600 11-speed chain uses Shimano’s low friction surface treatment known as Sil-Tec. It’s a PTFE surface coating that reduces friction while boosting durability. The technology first debuted a couple of years back on Shimano’s flagship Dura-Ace 9000 chain.

Hydraulic disc compatibility

Shimano st-rs685 lever, br-rs785 caliper and sm-rt99 rotor:

The big news is that Shimano has now expanded hydraulic disc technology to work with a mechanical drivetrain rather than the Di2-only previous components. This has been achieved by the company introducing the?ST-RS685, a new dual-control lever that houses 11-speed shifting internals alongside the guts of Shimano’s hydraulic brake. The 11-speed shifter can be paired with the drivetrain of?Shimano’s Dura-Ace and Ultegra mechanical groups as well as this latest version of 105.

Both the ST-RS685 shifter and the new BR-RS785 hydraulic disc brake will remain a non-series component, meaning they won’t belong to a particular product group such as Ultegra or Dura-Ace.

Flat handlebar shifter?

SL-RS700_R_L:

Shimano has decided to offer another non-series component that builds on the versatility of the 105 group: a pair of 11-speed flat bar shifters. These should provide a decent option for manufacturers or individuals looking for premium shifting on flat bar hybrids without having to resort to often overbuilt mountain bike components. Once again these parts will work with Shimano’s Dura-Ace and Ultegra mechanical .

PD-5800 Pedals

PD-5800_L:

Details are scarce on 105’s new pedals at the moment, but we are expecting to see both carbon and resin versions available – the former shaving 50g over the current alloy models at 285g.

The groupset will be available in black and silver options with stock expected from June 2014.


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Shimano invests in dealer program, changes Interbike strategy

Company continues with tech clinics and Outdoor Demo tent IRVINE, Calif. (BRAIN) —   Shimano is putting more emphasis on one-on-one meetings with its dealers — at its place and theirs — as it reduces its presence on the floor of this fall’s Interbike Expo .