shimano

Pearl Izumi offers fit guarantee on clothing sold at specialty retailers

LOUISVILLE, Colo. (BRAIN) —?Pearl Izumi is announcing a new “60-Day Fit Guarantee” that applies to all Pearl cycling apparel purchased at any Pearl Izumi partner specialty bike shops

Best women’s road bike: a guide to help you get the right bike for you

There’s nothing like road cycling for the sheer speed you can travel at and distances you can go. Once you’ve eliminated the other possible women’s bike types from your list, it’s time to get down to enjoying some high-speed, skinny-rubbered fun. We’re here to help you find the best women’s road bike for you.

Road cycling is the discipline of choice for those who like going fast. Whether you want to fly along country lanes, explore the landscape, or pit your racing skills against others or the clock, road cycling has something to offer everyone. It’s also amazing exercise, burning calories, improving cardiovascular health, and getting those legs toned up and strong. 

  • Best women’s mountain bike: How to choose the right bike for you
  • Best women’s bikes: A buyer’s guide to find what you need
  • Best bike: What type of bike shall I buy?
  • Buyers guide to road bike wheels

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There are more women’s bikes available on the market than ever before

Do I need a women’s road bike? 

Once upon a time, buying a women’s road bike meant buying a scaled-down version of a unisex or men’s bike with a ‘feminine’ (read pink and/or floral) paint scheme. This was the infamous shrink-it-and-pink-it approach to designing products for women, which is thankfully, in the bike industry at least, on its way out.

  • Do I need a women’s bike?

It wasn’t the choice of paint so much as the ethos behind the design that was the issue; the assumption that women were just scaled down versions of men. Thankfully, with the growth in women’s cycling, increasing numbers of women working in the bike industry, and better data available on women’s body dimensions and power output, few brands approach women’s-specific bike design in that way any more. In fact, there are three main approaches brands can take. 

  • The first is based on the assumption that women have, on average, longer legs and shorter bodies than men. This is still a prevalent view in bike design, and influences how a number of women’s-specific bikes are designed. This usually translates into bikes that have a shorter reach and give a more upright riding position. This can work very well for some women, particular those with shorter torsos, or those who prefer that upright position. It can work less well for taller women and those who want a more aggressive, racy position on the bike. 
  • A second approach is to develop women’s bikes with different geometry to unisex bikes, but to base these designs on data collected from a large number of women, and to take into account the purpose of that bike, the type of body position the rider will be in on that bike, and how much any morphological differences are likely to make for that design. This is an approach Specialized takes, for example. 
  • Finally, some brands feel that the differences between genders aren’t great enough to warrant a completely different frame design, but that getting the correct size of frame and ensuring the overall bike fit is correct is more important. Hoy bikes in the UK takes this approach, producing more sizes with smaller incremental differences between them, and providing a bike fit included in the price that will swap out elements like the handlebar and stem to get the best fit possible.

How much should I spend? 

  • You may want to keep some money in your budget aside for some key maintenance items. Road bike tyres run at high pressures, and keeping them topped up with air will prevent punctures and the bike rolling slowly. A track pump is the most efficient way to do this, so if you don’t have one, get one. 
  • Most road bikes will be supplied with either basic flat pedals or no pedals at all, so again leave some money aside for a decent pair. Most riders use a clip system to clip cycling shoes into place on the pedal, as this gives a much more efficient ride. 
  • Under £500 – Alloy frame and fork, a seven-speed double crankset (giving you 14 gears), with alloy bars and stem. 
  • £500 to £700 – Alloy frame with carbon or alloy forks, and eight- or nine-speed gears (often Shimano Sora or Claris) with a double or triple crankset. 
  • £700 to £1000 – Alloy frame with carbon or alloy forks, 10-speed Shimano Tiagra (or similar) with a double crankset, and in some cases with mechanical disc brakes. 
  • £1000 to £1500 – Alloy frame with carbon fork, Shimano Tiagra or similar 10-speed gearing, rising to Shimano 105 11-speed (so 22 gears) at the higher end of the price scale. Hydraulic disc brake options and lighter components are likely to feature around this price point. 
  • £1500 to £2000 – Carbon frame and carbon forks, lightweight and high-end Shimano Ultegra or similar 11-speed gearing, carbon bars.
  • £2000 and upwards – This is getting towards the level of kit used by professional racers. Expect carbon frames and forks, carbon parts, hydraulic disc brakes or quality rim brakes, lightweight wheels, plus Shimano Di2 electronic gear shifting. 
  • How to buy a used or second-hand bike online

What type of road bike do I need? 

Rim brakes vs disc brakes

  • Road disc brakes: everything you need to know
  • Are road disc brakes dangerous?

Electronic vs cable-operated shifting

  • Shimano talkes wireless shifting and Di2

What size women’s road bike do I need? 

  • Road bike sizing: What size bike do I need?
  • How to get your road bike position right
  • From unisex to female friendly: 6 tweaks for a better bike fit

Popular women’s road bikes

  • BikeRadar road bike reviews

Best women’s road cycling clothing

  • Five new women’s cycle clothing brands you need to check out
  • Best bike helmets: A buyer’s guide to help you find what’s right for you

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Shimano XT Di2 opens up the electronic-shifting frontier

Shimano’s XTR Di2 group really, really impressed our testers with its performance, but the price is incredibly high. If you’re tempted by the possibilities of an electronically-controlled mountain bike drivetrain but weary of the steep cost of admission, the recently unveiled XT Di2 kit might be the group you’ve been waiting for.

In addition to lowering the price point, Shimano focused on refining ergonomics, improving durability, making the group “smarter” and adding some wireless functionality. If XT Di2 lives up to Shimano’s claims, there will be a lot to like about this group when it becomes available in September.

  • Buyer’s guide to mountain bike groupsets

Deore XT SW-M8050 Firebolt shifters

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The XT-level Di2 shifters have been tweaked from the top-tier XTR version. The size of the rotary shift paddles has been increased slightly, the stroke is slightly shorter, with a single click, and they offer adjustable positioning to suit rider preference.

Shimano’s mountain bike product manager, Matt Robertson, was quick to tout the benefits of electronic shifters over the mechanical versions.

“We can choose exactly the spring rate and lever feel we want. We don’t have to worry about clutch force or cable pull,” Robertson said.

Deore XT Di2 FD-M8070 front derailleur

Deore XT RD-M8050-GS Di2 Shimano Shadow RD+ rear derailleur ?

SC-MT800 system information display

XT Di2 weight comparisons

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Shimano XT Di2 opens up the electronic-shifting frontier

Shimano’s XTR Di2 group really, really impressed our testers with its performance, but the price is incredibly high. If you’re tempted by the possibilities of an electronically-controlled mountain bike drivetrain but weary of the steep cost of admission, the recently unveiled XT Di2 kit might be the group you’ve been waiting for.

In addition to lowering the price point, Shimano focused on refining ergonomics, improving durability, making the group “smarter” and adding some wireless functionality. If XT Di2 lives up to Shimano’s claims, there will be a lot to like about this group when it becomes available in September.

  • Buyer’s guide to mountain bike groupsets

Deore XT SW-M8050 Firebolt shifters

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The XT-level Di2 shifters have been tweaked from the top-tier XTR version. The size of the rotary shift paddles has been increased slightly, the stroke is slightly shorter, with a single click, and they offer adjustable positioning to suit rider preference.

Shimano’s mountain bike product manager, Matt Robertson, was quick to tout the benefits of electronic shifters over the mechanical versions.

“We can choose exactly the spring rate and lever feel we want. We don’t have to worry about clutch force or cable pull,” Robertson said.

Deore XT Di2 FD-M8070 front derailleur

Deore XT RD-M8050-GS Di2 Shimano Shadow RD+ rear derailleur ?

SC-MT800 system information display

XT Di2 weight comparisons

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Shimano announces its second electronic shifting mountain bike group, plus new wireless features and redesigned SLX parts

The new Deore XT Di2 group will be available in September. SAN JOSE, Calif. (BRAIN) — On Thursday, the opening day of this year’s Sea Otter Classic, Shimano went public with news of its second electronic shifting mountain bike group, Deore XT Di2 M8050.

Garmin’s Vector Shimano Ultegra Pedal Cartridge kit brings the power

Garmin has just announced their Vector pedal-based power system is coming to Shimano pedals (sort of). The new DIY Vector Shimano Cartridge Kit will allow the Vector 2 and 2S hardware (bought separately) to be swapped into a Shimano PD-6800 pedal body.

Essentially the cartridge kit is made up of a Shimano spindle adaptor, a cartridge removal tool and a few replacement nuts, washers and spacers in case any are lost or damaged in the change over. The process seems quite simple and doesn’t require any specialist tools that aren’t included in the kit.

  • Best power meters
  • PowerTap P1 power meter review

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Garmin have said the Spindle Kit is only compatible with the Ultegra level pedals, and we understand the incompatibility with the Dura-Ace as there’s an outboard bearing where the pedal pods would sit, but we’re unsure why it won’t work with the 105 pedals, as the body and spindle design are nearly identical.

When the Vector 2 and 2S were announced we’d expected to see a mountain bike version of the pedal based power meter, though with the widespread use of Shimano road pedals, it’s no surprise the spindle kit was designed for the popular Ultegra level pedals based on their price and performance. That said, the GPS giant has also said they won’t be selling pre-built versions of the Ultegra Vector combo.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

BikeRadar Battle: SRAM Eagle vs Shimano Eagle

SRAM’s latest mountain bike drivetrain cranks the volume past 11 all the way to 12 — because 12 is one more than 11 and more is always better, right? Not so fast, jive turkey. Long before SRAM launched its 12-speed Eagle drivetrain, Shimano was equipping 10-speeds with its own Eagle derailleurs.

Here’s how these two components that would never, ever, be bolted to the same bicycle stack up against each other in BikeRadar’s bird battle royale!

Features

In comparing these two derailleurs, it’s amazing how little the rear derailleur has changed in forty years.

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SRAM and Shimano Eagle derailleurs share many of the same features, including barrel adjusters to fine-tune cable tension, limit screws to control the range of movement, B-tension screws to adjust the orientation of the derailleur cage in relation to the freewheel/cassette, and a pair of jockey wheels through which the chain travels.

There are, of course, some striking differences.

SRAM Eagle builds on the success of SRAM’s clutch-equipped Type II derailleurs with a “Type 3” clutch that is said to be stronger as well as smoother.

Winner: SRAM Eagle

Durability

Winner: Shimano Eagle

Shifting performance

Winner: Isaac Hayes

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Over-the-air firmware update adds Di2 and eTap functions to Wahoo ELEMNT computer

ATLANTA?(BRAIN) — Wahoo has issued a firmware update to its ELEMNT GPS bike computer, adding several new functions that work with some Shimano Di2 groups and SRAM’s eTap drivetrain. The new firmware also adds support for muscle oxygen sensors. Users can update the firmware on the computers wirelessly, via Wifi.

Brooklyn Bicycle Co. adds hybrids

NEW YORK —Brooklyn Bicycle Co. has expanded its lineup with the introduction of two hybrid models, the recreational bike brand’s first hybrids — the Roebling and Lorimer. Brooklyn’s lineup now covers 12 models.

Shimano XT M8020 Trail pedals

Few mountain bike products have remained so similar over such a long period as Shimano’s SPD pedals. In fact, the Japanese behemoth is currently celebrating the SPD pedal’s 25th anniversary.

Released alongside Shimano XT 11-speed, we’ve been testing the subtly updated XT M8020 Trail pedal. In many ways it’s a similar pedal to those of years past, but small refinements trickled down from XTR pedals have ensured it remains as the market benchmark.

Designed for the trail, enduro and all-mountain mountain biker, the Trail pedal encases the SPD mechanism within an alloy platform. This is the key difference when compared with the lighter ‘Race’ version available.

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The details

Much of the XT M8020 Trail pedal is the same as its XT Trail M785 predecessor. At a quick glimpse, you’d be easily excused for thinking they’re unchanged.

Related: Shimano M8000 XT Race vs M8020 XT Trail pedals

Get closer, and you’ll see the platform surrounding the pedal mechanism has grown. It’s all about maximizing the pedal to shoe surface area and for this the new M8020 version is 3.3mm wider, resulting in a claimed 11.7% increase of contact surface. Additionally, the pedal body is now .5mm shallower, getting you a hair closer to the axle.

The ride

Is it worth an upgrade?

You can read more at BikeRadar.com