ritchey

Ritchey Design working with Oris Intelligence for MAP regulation

SAN CARLOS, Calif. (BRAIN) — Ritchey Design, which has had a minium advertised price policy since at least 2014 , is now working with Oris Intelligence to regulate the policy. “A recharged enforcement of MAP is a crucial step forward for us,” said Phil Ellinwood, Ritchey’s CFO

Ritchey sells complete bikes dealer direct in Europe

FRIEDRICHSHAFEN, Germany (BRAIN) — For years Ritchey told dealers asking for complete bikes that it wasn’t going to happen while its OEM component sales represented such a large portion of its business. The thinking is a component maker shouldn’t compete with its customers by offering complete bikes

Five soft-riding road seatposts tested in the lab and on the road

There are lots of seatpost options these days that promise a more comfortable ride without the complication (and weight) of mechanical pivots or sliding bits. But which ones actually work, and which are just hype? We enlisted the help of Microbac Laboratories in Boulder, Colorado to find out which of the new crop of soft-riding rigid seatposts does the best job of saving your butt.

For all the work that road bike designers put into making their frames more comfortable, the simple fact remains that their triangulated tube layouts make them inherently resistant to movement under vertical loads. Seatposts, on the other hand, are simple cantilevered tubes with no additional bracing, meaning they’re free to flap about in the breeze and far more apt to move when you hit something.

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A bicycle frame’s triangulated arrangement of tubes doesn’t allow for much flex. A seatpost, however, is much more free to move under load

Of course, all seatposts are not created equal – even when they share critical dimensions such as diameter and length – and component engineers have recently started to capitalise more thoroughly on the design possibilities of carbon fibre composites. Fibre lay-ups and even the fibre types themselves can be tuned to allow more flex in one plane than another, for example, while more elaborate designs cleverly incorporate mechanisms to promote movement without the complexity (and weight) of physical pivots, springs, and dampers.

Road bikes don’t generally have to deal with much in terms of bump amplitude, though, so while some companies have focused on taking the edge off of bigger hits, others have decided to concentrate on canceling out annoying vibrations that come with coarsely paved asphalt – that incessant buzzing that might not have much effect at first but can really become irritating after a couple of hours.

The contenders

  • Canyon VCLS: Canyon’s entry has actually been around for several years now – so long, in fact, that the company no longer offers it as an aftermarket product but still includes it on many of its complete bikes. Instead of only using carbon fibres in this post, Canyon incorporates a mix of carbon and basalt fibres in a specific lay-up pattern that supposedly allows for lots of flex fore and aft but not side to side.
  • Ergon CF3 Pro Carbon/ Canyon VCLS 2.0: Offered as both the Ergon CF3 Pro Carbon and the Canyon VCLS 2.0 (respective company heads Frank Arnold and Roman Arnold are brothers), this rather ingeniously designed seatpost splits the usual cylindrical cross-section into two halves. In essence, this creates two flat leaf springs that are inherently more prone to move upon impact but without adding undue bulk or mass. This is strictly a road/CX-only model, though, as it’s explicitly not approved for mountain bike use and carries a 100kg (220lb) rider-plus-gear weight limit.
  • Ritchey WCS Carbon Link FlexLogic: Much like the Canyon VCLS, Ritchey’s entry looks like any other typical carbon fibre seatpost from the outside. Beneath the skin, though, Ritchey says the fibre plies have been tuned to be more flexible under load over the company’s standard carbon offerings – by as much as 15% based on claims. The interchangeable head accepts Ritchey’s single-rail saddles, too, and this model is by far the lightest of the bunch.
  • Specialized CG-R: Certainly the most unusual looking of the bunch, the CG-R incorporates a pivotless carbon hinge up top plus an elastomer wedge that Specialized says provides up to 18mm of vertical movement along with “unsurpassed comfort, control, and efficiency without adding weight or complication to the frame.” As promised, it’s certainly light and the location of the flex mechanism doesn’t require much seatpost extension, which could be a boon for shorter riders.
  • Syntace P6 Carbon HiFlex: This seatpost follows the same philosophy as the Ritchey, resorting to careful fibre orientations to promote a smoother ride – “twice the shock absorption capabilities in the riding direction as previously”, at least according to Syntace. Notably, this is the longest seatpost in our test and carries no usage restrictions or weight limit so it’d also be a viable option for trail riding.
  • Thomson Elite: This stalwart model served as the benchmark for our test – a machined aluminum seatpost that has proven itself to be one of the most popular premium models ever produced as well as one of the most durable. We also chose this model for its well-documented firm ride quality. If ever there was a standard to be measured by, this is it.

The results

So which one is best for you?

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Ritchey offers complete bikes for first time in 15 years

BOULDER CITY, Nev. (BRAIN) —?For the first time in about 15 years, Ritchey Design is offering dealers complete bikes, which it showed to retailers at Interbike’s OutDoor Demo on Monday and Tuesday.

Ritchey Pro Paradigm V5 MTB pedal

With our pair weighing 265g, Ritchey’s Pro Paradigms are a strong option for riders looking to minimise weight and maximise speed. Ritchey’s achieved this by cutting away as much of the pedal’s body as possible, rather than fiddling with axle materials – chromoly steel is still used here with an alloy body.

With minimal body, the Pro Paradigm clears mud and grit easily. With no body around the mechanism, the cleat occasionally disengages with rock strikes and where the design falls down is cleat engagement. We found we needed precise alignment between pedal and cleat otherwise the cleat is prone to rotating the pedal rather than engaging in it.

The Ritchey design looks similar to Shimano’s SPD system, and handily the cleats are cross compatible, meaning we could use our full range of shoes with the pedals. In use the Ritchey pedals plus cleats feel very similar to a full Shimano setup, but with Shimano cleats there’s a little more wiggling possible. Engagement is as positive as a Shimano pedal and once in you get a very firm feeling position on the pedal. Release tension can be adjusted, with a decent range from beginner friendly to XC racer tight.

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The bushing, bearing and needle bearing system have stood up to some nasty winter conditions and racing.

This article was originally published in What Mountain Bike magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Ritchey P-650b frame review

During our testing of Ritchey’s P-650b frame, we constantly heard comments along the lines of: “It looks old, yet new – what is it?”

For the passionate mountain biker, the colours and lines of this frame will likely raise your pulse. If you’re newer to the sport, the man behind the brand – Tom Ritchey – has been involved in the development of the mountain bike from the very beginning. Along with his own frames, Ritchey once made frames for a small company named MountainBikes, run by Gary Fisher and Charlie Kelly.

It's an inconic name in mountain biking, tom ritchey has been in the sport from the earliest of days :

The man and the mo…

This is the second generation 650b equipped frame for Ritchey, with the first created back in 1977. At the time, sources for appropriate tyres dried up and Ritchey was forced to move onto using the readily available 26in wheels.

Frame: fuss-free elegance

The new-model Ritchey, much like some other recent steel frame offerings, is about getting back to mountain biking’s roots and escaping the latest technology that we so often get caught up in (guilty as charged). The lines are fuss-free and there are no apologies for such ‘old’ features as the 68mm threaded bottom bracket and 28.6mm front derailleur clamp or lack of a rear thru-axle and dropper-seatpost compatibility.

Hard to deny it, the ritchey oozes classic style : hard to deny it, the ritchey oozes classic style

The P-650b is a classic looking chassis

Made solely of cromoly steel, the Ritchey has classical thin tubing, with smooth bends in the right places and held together by clean welds. This creates a traditional aesthetic that isn’t often seen on the trails today (excluding the occasional sight of frames from custom builders).

We weighed our bare medium 17in sample frame at 2028g. From this alone, you know this isn’t designed as a hardtail to compete with the latest offerings in either carbon or alloy. With the right components you can still build a competitively weighted bike, but it’s never going to set any records.

For 2015, the p-650b gains a tapered head-tube. our 2014 version uses a straight 1 1/8in steerer: for 2015, the p-650b gains a tapered head-tube. our 2014 version uses a straight 1 1/8in steerer

Slightly unusually for such a classic-looking frame, the head tube is ready to accept an integrated headset

The down tube, designed for use with a 100mm suspension fork, cleanly curves behind the head tube to allow clearance of the fork crown. Holding the 1 1/8in fork steerer in place, that forged and machined head tube uses an easily serviced integrated Campy-type headset.

The 68mm English threaded bottom bracket and 28.6mm band clamp front derailleur are two features you won’t see on many modern bikes. But these classic inclusions were the norm just a handful of years ago and are still well catered for with new components.

An integrated seat clamp is practical and helps with the classic styling : an integrated seat clamp is practical and helps with the classic styling

A common sight on older steel frames, the integrated seatclamp is a neat touch

An integrated seat clamp holds a 27.2mm seat post firmly in place, with the skinny diameter allowing a little flex to complement the frame.

Ritchey has stuck with open cable runs for the front and rear derailleurs. It’s something that has lost popularity in the past few years to guided full-length housing, but remains the lightest and lowest friction option when new.

The rear brake is cleanly tucked within the rear triangle. cheaper brakes without banjo-type hose connections will likely suffer from awkward bends to reach the seatstay hose routing: the rear brake is cleanly tucked within the rear triangle. cheaper brakes without banjo-type hose connections will likely suffer from awkward bends to reach the seatstay hose routing

Tyre clearance is reasonable but not overly generous. Just ensure that your rear brake features a swivel banjo-type hose fitting

Next to the forged rear dropouts sits the brake mount, cleanly tucked within the rear triangle. Cheaper brakes without a banjo-type hose connection will likely suffer from awkward bends to reach the seatstay hose routing. Keep this in mind, as you’ll likely need at least a Shimano SLX, SRAM Guide or equivalent brake.

For 2015, the frame remains most unchanged with the exception of a tapered head tube and new paint scheme. While we prefer the Ritchey race team paint scheme of our 2014 version, the inclusion of a tapered head tube will expand your front fork options.

Equipment: a mishmash of parts combine to conjure the Ritchey as it should be

Our complete tester featured a whole bunch of ritchey components, an x-fusion fork, shimano xt brakes and a coverted 1x10 sram drivetrain: our complete tester featured a whole bunch of ritchey components, an x-fusion fork, shimano xt brakes and a coverted 1x10 sram drivetrain

Our sample was built with a range of Ritchey WCS Trail gea, the full bike as pictured weighed 10.65kg (23.43lb)

Sold frame-only, our sample was built with parts from Ritchey’s Australian distributor, so a spattering of Ritchey componentry is to be expected. The rest of the build gets a little more ‘bitser’, with a SRAM 1X10 drivetrain mixing with a few components from Token to prove it’s no off-the-shelf build.

Up front sits an X-Fusion Velvet R2R 110mm fork, a sneaky 10mm longer than the recommended travel length.

In a way, our tester was a perfect example of how the Ritchey frame should be built – with your finest spares. Many of us have those parts that are waiting for that ‘next project’ (perhaps with the exception of 650b wheels), and the Ritchey’s affordable frame-only price and old-standards compatibility makes it well placed for just that.

Ride and handling: modern geometry hidden behind classic paint

On the trail, the old looks are transformed into a modern trail bike-like ride with a confident and balanced manner in general cross country riding and medium-technical terrain.

With our sample bike built with a slightly longer than suggested 110mm X-Fusion fork and low riser handlebar, our position was comfortable, if not a little upright.

Taking into account the stock 70-degree head angle, the marginally taller fork helps to rake out the front a tad. This provides an aggressive position for tackling steep descents, and along with a short rear-end makes for a slight rear bias that made lofting the front wheel a breeze.

A 2014 ritchey wcs trail cockpit is featured on our tester, providing a direct connection to the fork. although, we did wish for a lower handlebar on steep climbs: a 2014 ritchey wcs trail cockpit is featured on our tester, providing a direct connection to the fork. although, we did wish for a lower handlebar on steep climbs

A lower bar height would help on the climbs

The somewhat taller handlebar height means climbs require more focus and a steady hand to stop the front end from wandering, although it’s a trade-off many will appreciate given the ride back down the hill. If the frame was ours to keep, we would fit a flat handlebar and even a lower headset topcap to lower the front-end.

It’s common to hear people remark about the ride quality of a good steel frame, and on this score the Ritchey delivers without question. While not the softest steel frame we’ve ridden, it has an obvious ‘give’ which helps to absorb the sting of the trail and hands you a little spring off of rocks, roots and jumps.

The flipside of this is a lack of all-out frame stiffness. While we never felt the stiffness was an issue or negative trait on the trail, it’s certainly worth noting that the discerning watt-counting (as well as gram counting) racer will likely prefer the zippier ride given from a plastic-fantastic machine. But then, the purchaser of this frame is unlikely to be someone who cares above all about the latest stiffness to weight ratio figures, or even besting that local Strava segment.

There’s absolutely no denying the element of old-school style that comes with this frame – and it’s likely to come out in your riding. On top of giving new life to our oldest riding jerseys, we found ourselves sticking our feet out and tripoding around corners just for the sake of it.

Though it’s not the very best at anything, this chassis is about getting back to what got us started – as well as nodding to Ritchey’s history – not worrying over the latest technology.?








Ritchey 2015: new bars, stems, wheels and more from Eurobike

Ritchey’s product range is already massive and yet it continues to grow for 2015 with new road and mountain wheels, updated bars and stems, ultralight saddles and posts, and even new pedals and grips.

Here are some details on what you’ll find in shops soon.

Wheels: wider, more tubeless compatibility

Width and tubeless compatibility are common themes for Ritchey’s new wheel offerings for 2015. First up are the new WCS Zeta Disc road wheels, which sport the same hub internals as the rim-specific WCS Zeta II wheels but with large-diameter spoke flanges all around, a broader tubeless-compatible rim with a very generous 20mm internal width, and splined interfaces for Shimano’s Center Lock disc rotors.

Ritchey's new wcs zeta disc brings disc brake compatibility to the road along with offset 20mm-wide (internal width) tubeless-compatible aluminum rims. claimed weight is 1,560g for the pair and retail price is just us$800: ritchey's new wcs zeta disc brings disc brake compatibility to the road along with offset 20mm-wide (internal width) tubeless-compatible aluminum rims. claimed weight is 1,560g for the pair and retail price is just us$800

We’re dying to get a set of Ritchey’s new WCS Zeta Disc wheels set up on a ‘cross bike with their very generous 20mm internal rim widths

Claimed weight is a very reasonable 1,560g for the pair and retail price is just US$800 – a refreshingly attainable figure in a world where four-figure sums are far more common.

Next up on the road front are the new WCS Apex 60 carbon clinchers, which unfortunately aren’t tubeless-compatible but are quite wide with a 17mm internal width and a noticeable broad and blunt-shaped 60mm-deep profile that we anticipate will perform well in crosswinds.

Key features on the new ritchey wcs apex 60 carbon clinchers are wide rims with blunt noses for presumably good handling in crosswinds plus externally accessible spoke nipples for easy truing: key features on the new ritchey wcs apex 60 carbon clinchers are wide rims with blunt noses for presumably good handling in crosswinds plus externally accessible spoke nipples for easy truing

Ritchey’s new WCS Apex 60 carbon clinchers look fast but also easy to work on

Ritchey anchors these around its Phantom Flange hubs, which at first glance appear to require proprietary spokes but actually use standard J-bend ones. The externally accessible spoke nipples should help make maintenance even easier.

Claimed weight is 1,561g for the pair and retail price is US$1,600.

Off-road riders will get the new WCS Trail wheels – essentially mountain bike analogues of the WCS Zeta Disc, built with 25mm-wide (internal width) aluminium rims with solid outer walls for easy tubeless compatibility. Ritchey will offer these in both 27.5in and 29in sizes, both with swappable 15/20mm front thru-axle and 142mm rear thru-axle hub end caps.

New for 2015 from ritchey are the wcs trail wheels, which have a 25mm-wide (internal width) tubeless aluminum rim, 15/20mm front thru-axle compatibility, and both 27.5 and 29in sizes. claimed weight for the 27.5in version is 1,627g per pair and retail price is a very reasonable us$750: new for 2015 from ritchey are the wcs trail wheels, which have a 25mm-wide (internal width) tubeless aluminum rim, 15/20mm front thru-axle compatibility, and both 27.5 and 29in sizes. claimed weight for the 27.5in version is 1,627g per pair and retail price is a very reasonable us$750

Width and low weight are good – but reasonable prices are even better

Their claimed weight is 1,627g and retail price is US$750.

Bars, stems, seatposts and saddles galore

Naturally, Ritchey’s new range is also bolstered by an army of new cockpit components.

Ritchey’s wraparound C260 stem may offer excellent bar support but the associated installation hassles have apparently turned off a few too many people. New for 2015 is a detuned C220 version with a clamp that extends 220 degrees around the bar, allowing for a straight press-fit installation that doesn’t require any additional disassembly. Ritchey will offer the C220 in both forged alloy and carbon-wrapped ‘Matrix’ construction.

Fans of ritchey's wraparound c260 stem clamp design now have an option that doesn't require bars to be unwrapped for installation. the new c220 models (offered in both forged aluminum and carbon-wrapped aluminum) have a less radical clamp setup that allows the bar to just be pressed straight on: fans of ritchey's wraparound c260 stem clamp design now have an option that doesn't require bars to be unwrapped for installation. the new c220 models (offered in both forged aluminum and carbon-wrapped aluminum) have a less radical clamp setup that allows the bar to just be pressed straight on

The new C220 stems should be much easier to install than the current C260 ones

The WCS Trail stems become easier to work with, too, with faceplate bolts that are now flipped for better tool access. A new 35mm-diameter WCS Trail 35 platform is added for 2015, too, with stems available down to 45mm in length and bars measuring up to 780mm in width. Retail prices range from US$85-95.

On the road side, there’s the new 235g WCS Carbon Streem II bar with aero-shaped tops but traditional round drops and internal cable routing, a new SuperLogic carbon stem variant with an oversized 1 1/4in steerer clamp to work with bikes from Giant, Canyon, and others, and a sleek new laser-etched finish for the polished aluminium Classic range.

Weight weenies will be interested in the new Superlogic Vector Evo saddle and seatpost, which uses a new carbon fibre single-rail interface (that’s thankfully compatible with current Ritchey posts just by swapping out the head). According to Ritchey, the new saddle and post weigh just 260g combined.

Ritchey says its new superlogic vector evo saddle and seatpost weigh just 260g combined: ritchey says its new superlogic vector evo saddle and seatpost weigh just 260g combined

This saddle and post combined supposedly weigh just 260g

Also introduced at the Eurobike show is the new WCS Zeromax saddle shape with a very flat profile and central cutout, and the throwback WCS Carbon Bullmoose integrated carbon fibre mountain bike bar and stem.

Other bits and pieces

Need more? Ritchey also showed off its new 220g, US$170 WCS Carbon Echelon road pedals with carbon reinforced bodies, cartridge-style chromoly axles, and replaceable stainless steel wear plates. And if you need some more colour in your life, the True Grip foam grips are now offered in several hues to suit your fancy.

The new ritchey wcs carbon echelon pedals sport a carbon reinforced body, a cartridge-type chromoly spindle assembly, and a replaceable stainless steel wear plate. claimed weight is 220g for the pair (without cleats) and retail price is us$170: the new ritchey wcs carbon echelon pedals sport a carbon reinforced body, a cartridge-type chromoly spindle assembly, and a replaceable stainless steel wear plate. claimed weight is 220g for the pair (without cleats) and retail price is us$170

The new WCS Carbon Echelon pedals look pretty good for US$170

Speaking of colours, Ritchey has freshened up its steel mountain bike hardtails for 2015 with new colours and – finally – tapered head tubes, which will greatly expand the range of compatible suspension forks.?

Also new on its mountain bikes are tapered head tubes for wider compatibility with modern suspension forks. joining the new head tubes are tapered versions of ritchey's carbon fiber rigid forks: also new on its mountain bikes are tapered head tubes for wider compatibility with modern suspension forks. joining the new head tubes are tapered versions of ritchey's carbon fiber rigid forks

Tapered head tubes – finally!








Ritchey 2015: new bars, stems, wheels and more from Eurobike

Ritchey’s product range is already massive and yet it continues to grow for 2015 with new road and mountain wheels, updated bars and stems, ultralight saddles and posts, and even new pedals and grips.

Here are some details on what you’ll find in shops soon.

Wheels: wider, more tubeless compatibility

Width and tubeless compatibility are common themes for Ritchey’s new wheel offerings for 2015. First up are the new WCS Zeta Disc road wheels, which sport the same hub internals as the rim-specific WCS Zeta II wheels but with large-diameter spoke flanges all around, a broader tubeless-compatible rim with a very generous 20mm internal width, and splined interfaces for Shimano’s Center Lock disc rotors.

Ritchey's new wcs zeta disc brings disc brake compatibility to the road along with offset 20mm-wide (internal width) tubeless-compatible aluminum rims. claimed weight is 1,560g for the pair and retail price is just us$800: ritchey's new wcs zeta disc brings disc brake compatibility to the road along with offset 20mm-wide (internal width) tubeless-compatible aluminum rims. claimed weight is 1,560g for the pair and retail price is just us$800

We’re dying to get a set of Ritchey’s new WCS Zeta Disc wheels set up on a ‘cross bike with their very generous 20mm internal rim widths

Claimed weight is a very reasonable 1,560g for the pair and retail price is just US$800 – a refreshingly attainable figure in a world where four-figure sums are far more common.

Next up on the road front are the new WCS Apex 60 carbon clinchers, which unfortunately aren’t tubeless-compatible but are quite wide with a 17mm internal width and a noticeable broad and blunt-shaped 60mm-deep profile that we anticipate will perform well in crosswinds.

Key features on the new ritchey wcs apex 60 carbon clinchers are wide rims with blunt noses for presumably good handling in crosswinds plus externally accessible spoke nipples for easy truing: key features on the new ritchey wcs apex 60 carbon clinchers are wide rims with blunt noses for presumably good handling in crosswinds plus externally accessible spoke nipples for easy truing

Ritchey’s new WCS Apex 60 carbon clinchers look fast but also easy to work on

Ritchey anchors these around its Phantom Flange hubs, which at first glance appear to require proprietary spokes but actually use standard J-bend ones. The externally accessible spoke nipples should help make maintenance even easier.

Claimed weight is 1,561g for the pair and retail price is US$1,600.

Off-road riders will get the new WCS Trail wheels – essentially mountain bike analogues of the WCS Zeta Disc, built with 25mm-wide (internal width) aluminium rims with solid outer walls for easy tubeless compatibility. Ritchey will offer these in both 27.5in and 29in sizes, both with swappable 15/20mm front thru-axle and 142mm rear thru-axle hub end caps.

New for 2015 from ritchey are the wcs trail wheels, which have a 25mm-wide (internal width) tubeless aluminum rim, 15/20mm front thru-axle compatibility, and both 27.5 and 29in sizes. claimed weight for the 27.5in version is 1,627g per pair and retail price is a very reasonable us$750: new for 2015 from ritchey are the wcs trail wheels, which have a 25mm-wide (internal width) tubeless aluminum rim, 15/20mm front thru-axle compatibility, and both 27.5 and 29in sizes. claimed weight for the 27.5in version is 1,627g per pair and retail price is a very reasonable us$750

Width and low weight are good – but reasonable prices are even better

Their claimed weight is 1,627g and retail price is US$750.

Bars, stems, seatposts and saddles galore

Naturally, Ritchey’s new range is also bolstered by an army of new cockpit components.

Ritchey’s wraparound C260 stem may offer excellent bar support but the associated installation hassles have apparently turned off a few too many people. New for 2015 is a detuned C220 version with a clamp that extends 220 degrees around the bar, allowing for a straight press-fit installation that doesn’t require any additional disassembly. Ritchey will offer the C220 in both forged alloy and carbon-wrapped ‘Matrix’ construction.

Fans of ritchey's wraparound c260 stem clamp design now have an option that doesn't require bars to be unwrapped for installation. the new c220 models (offered in both forged aluminum and carbon-wrapped aluminum) have a less radical clamp setup that allows the bar to just be pressed straight on: fans of ritchey's wraparound c260 stem clamp design now have an option that doesn't require bars to be unwrapped for installation. the new c220 models (offered in both forged aluminum and carbon-wrapped aluminum) have a less radical clamp setup that allows the bar to just be pressed straight on

The new C220 stems should be much easier to install than the current C260 ones

The WCS Trail stems become easier to work with, too, with faceplate bolts that are now flipped for better tool access. A new 35mm-diameter WCS Trail 35 platform is added for 2015, too, with stems available down to 45mm in length and bars measuring up to 780mm in width. Retail prices range from US$85-95.

On the road side, there’s the new 235g WCS Carbon Streem II bar with aero-shaped tops but traditional round drops and internal cable routing, a new SuperLogic carbon stem variant with an oversized 1 1/4in steerer clamp to work with bikes from Giant, Canyon, and others, and a sleek new laser-etched finish for the polished aluminium Classic range.

Weight weenies will be interested in the new Superlogic Vector Evo saddle and seatpost, which uses a new carbon fibre single-rail interface (that’s thankfully compatible with current Ritchey posts just by swapping out the head). According to Ritchey, the new saddle and post weigh just 260g combined.

Ritchey says its new superlogic vector evo saddle and seatpost weigh just 260g combined: ritchey says its new superlogic vector evo saddle and seatpost weigh just 260g combined

This saddle and post combined supposedly weigh just 260g

Also introduced at the Eurobike show is the new WCS Zeromax saddle shape with a very flat profile and central cutout, and the throwback WCS Carbon Bullmoose integrated carbon fibre mountain bike bar and stem.

Other bits and pieces

Need more? Ritchey also showed off its new 220g, US$170 WCS Carbon Echelon road pedals with carbon reinforced bodies, cartridge-style chromoly axles, and replaceable stainless steel wear plates. And if you need some more colour in your life, the True Grip foam grips are now offered in several hues to suit your fancy.

The new ritchey wcs carbon echelon pedals sport a carbon reinforced body, a cartridge-type chromoly spindle assembly, and a replaceable stainless steel wear plate. claimed weight is 220g for the pair (without cleats) and retail price is us$170: the new ritchey wcs carbon echelon pedals sport a carbon reinforced body, a cartridge-type chromoly spindle assembly, and a replaceable stainless steel wear plate. claimed weight is 220g for the pair (without cleats) and retail price is us$170

The new WCS Carbon Echelon pedals look pretty good for US$170

Speaking of colours, Ritchey has freshened up its steel mountain bike hardtails for 2015 with new colours and – finally – tapered head tubes, which will greatly expand the range of compatible suspension forks.?

Also new on its mountain bikes are tapered head tubes for wider compatibility with modern suspension forks. joining the new head tubes are tapered versions of ritchey's carbon fiber rigid forks: also new on its mountain bikes are tapered head tubes for wider compatibility with modern suspension forks. joining the new head tubes are tapered versions of ritchey's carbon fiber rigid forks

Tapered head tubes – finally!








Ritchey 2015: new bars, stems, wheels and more from Eurobike

Ritchey’s product range is already massive and yet it continues to grow for 2015 with new road and mountain wheels, updated bars and stems, ultralight saddles and posts, and even new pedals and grips.

Here are some details on what you’ll find in shops soon.

Wheels: wider, more tubeless compatibility

Width and tubeless compatibility are common themes for Ritchey’s new wheel offerings for 2015. First up are the new WCS Zeta Disc road wheels, which sport the same hub internals as the rim-specific WCS Zeta II wheels but with large-diameter spoke flanges all around, a broader tubeless-compatible rim with a very generous 20mm internal width, and splined interfaces for Shimano’s Center Lock disc rotors.

Ritchey's new wcs zeta disc brings disc brake compatibility to the road along with offset 20mm-wide (internal width) tubeless-compatible aluminum rims. claimed weight is 1,560g for the pair and retail price is just us$800: ritchey's new wcs zeta disc brings disc brake compatibility to the road along with offset 20mm-wide (internal width) tubeless-compatible aluminum rims. claimed weight is 1,560g for the pair and retail price is just us$800

We’re dying to get a set of Ritchey’s new WCS Zeta Disc wheels set up on a ‘cross bike with their very generous 20mm internal rim widths

Claimed weight is a very reasonable 1,560g for the pair and retail price is just US$800 – a refreshingly attainable figure in a world where four-figure sums are far more common.

Next up on the road front are the new WCS Apex 60 carbon clinchers, which unfortunately aren’t tubeless-compatible but are quite wide with a 17mm internal width and a noticeable broad and blunt-shaped 60mm-deep profile that we anticipate will perform well in crosswinds.

Key features on the new ritchey wcs apex 60 carbon clinchers are wide rims with blunt noses for presumably good handling in crosswinds plus externally accessible spoke nipples for easy truing: key features on the new ritchey wcs apex 60 carbon clinchers are wide rims with blunt noses for presumably good handling in crosswinds plus externally accessible spoke nipples for easy truing

Ritchey’s new WCS Apex 60 carbon clinchers look fast but also easy to work on

Ritchey anchors these around its Phantom Flange hubs, which at first glance appear to require proprietary spokes but actually use standard J-bend ones. The externally accessible spoke nipples should help make maintenance even easier.

Claimed weight is 1,561g for the pair and retail price is US$1,600.

Off-road riders will get the new WCS Trail wheels – essentially mountain bike analogues of the WCS Zeta Disc, built with 25mm-wide (internal width) aluminium rims with solid outer walls for easy tubeless compatibility. Ritchey will offer these in both 27.5in and 29in sizes, both with swappable 15/20mm front thru-axle and 142mm rear thru-axle hub end caps.

New for 2015 from ritchey are the wcs trail wheels, which have a 25mm-wide (internal width) tubeless aluminum rim, 15/20mm front thru-axle compatibility, and both 27.5 and 29in sizes. claimed weight for the 27.5in version is 1,627g per pair and retail price is a very reasonable us$750: new for 2015 from ritchey are the wcs trail wheels, which have a 25mm-wide (internal width) tubeless aluminum rim, 15/20mm front thru-axle compatibility, and both 27.5 and 29in sizes. claimed weight for the 27.5in version is 1,627g per pair and retail price is a very reasonable us$750

Width and low weight are good – but reasonable prices are even better

Their claimed weight is 1,627g and retail price is US$750.

Bars, stems, seatposts and saddles galore

Naturally, Ritchey’s new range is also bolstered by an army of new cockpit components.

Ritchey’s wraparound C260 stem may offer excellent bar support but the associated installation hassles have apparently turned off a few too many people. New for 2015 is a detuned C220 version with a clamp that extends 220 degrees around the bar, allowing for a straight press-fit installation that doesn’t require any additional disassembly. Ritchey will offer the C220 in both forged alloy and carbon-wrapped ‘Matrix’ construction.

Fans of ritchey's wraparound c260 stem clamp design now have an option that doesn't require bars to be unwrapped for installation. the new c220 models (offered in both forged aluminum and carbon-wrapped aluminum) have a less radical clamp setup that allows the bar to just be pressed straight on: fans of ritchey's wraparound c260 stem clamp design now have an option that doesn't require bars to be unwrapped for installation. the new c220 models (offered in both forged aluminum and carbon-wrapped aluminum) have a less radical clamp setup that allows the bar to just be pressed straight on

The new C220 stems should be much easier to install than the current C260 ones

The WCS Trail stems become easier to work with, too, with faceplate bolts that are now flipped for better tool access. A new 35mm-diameter WCS Trail 35 platform is added for 2015, too, with stems available down to 45mm in length and bars measuring up to 780mm in width. Retail prices range from US$85-95.

On the road side, there’s the new 235g WCS Carbon Streem II bar with aero-shaped tops but traditional round drops and internal cable routing, a new SuperLogic carbon stem variant with an oversized 1 1/4in steerer clamp to work with bikes from Giant, Canyon, and others, and a sleek new laser-etched finish for the polished aluminium Classic range.

Weight weenies will be interested in the new Superlogic Vector Evo saddle and seatpost, which uses a new carbon fibre single-rail interface (that’s thankfully compatible with current Ritchey posts just by swapping out the head). According to Ritchey, the new saddle and post weigh just 260g combined.

Ritchey says its new superlogic vector evo saddle and seatpost weigh just 260g combined: ritchey says its new superlogic vector evo saddle and seatpost weigh just 260g combined

This saddle and post combined supposedly weigh just 260g

Also introduced at the Eurobike show is the new WCS Zeromax saddle shape with a very flat profile and central cutout, and the throwback WCS Carbon Bullmoose integrated carbon fibre mountain bike bar and stem.

Other bits and pieces

Need more? Ritchey also showed off its new 220g, US$170 WCS Carbon Echelon road pedals with carbon reinforced bodies, cartridge-style chromoly axles, and replaceable stainless steel wear plates. And if you need some more colour in your life, the True Grip foam grips are now offered in several hues to suit your fancy.

The new ritchey wcs carbon echelon pedals sport a carbon reinforced body, a cartridge-type chromoly spindle assembly, and a replaceable stainless steel wear plate. claimed weight is 220g for the pair (without cleats) and retail price is us$170: the new ritchey wcs carbon echelon pedals sport a carbon reinforced body, a cartridge-type chromoly spindle assembly, and a replaceable stainless steel wear plate. claimed weight is 220g for the pair (without cleats) and retail price is us$170

The new WCS Carbon Echelon pedals look pretty good for US$170

Speaking of colours, Ritchey has freshened up its steel mountain bike hardtails for 2015 with new colours and – finally – tapered head tubes, which will greatly expand the range of compatible suspension forks.?

Also new on its mountain bikes are tapered head tubes for wider compatibility with modern suspension forks. joining the new head tubes are tapered versions of ritchey's carbon fiber rigid forks: also new on its mountain bikes are tapered head tubes for wider compatibility with modern suspension forks. joining the new head tubes are tapered versions of ritchey's carbon fiber rigid forks

Tapered head tubes – finally!








New Ritchey bars, stems, saddles and wheels for road and MTB

Ritchey’s R&D crew has been busy, and the company released a flurry of new product for the 2014 model year. Updated bars, stems and seatposts are a given from the cockpit component juggernaut but also coming soon is an all-new road hub design with some intriguing convenient features.

Introducing Phantom Flange hubs

Ritchey bucks industry trends for its new road Phantom Flange road hubset, passing over straight-pull spokes in favor of traditional J-bend spokes that are easier for riders to source and replace. A clever hidden front and rear non-driveside flange design, however, lends the appearance of a straight-pull hub that may appeal to those seeking a more modern look. Rear driveside spokes are all laced heads-in to increase effective flange spacing while a slight offset prevents excessive spoke bending as they travel from hub to rim.

Other features include a conventional four-cartridge rear and two-cartridge front bearing layout but a new six-pawl driver mechanism underlying the interchangeable alloy freehub bodies. The new hubs are also light with claimed front and rear weights of just 70g and 207g, respectively.

Cyclocross racers who typically see lots of nasty weather – and frequent travelers – will likely be interested in the new hubset’s ease of disassembly. Hand-removable freehub bodies are nothing new but the Phantom Flange rear hub’s axle and driveside bearing can also be extracted without tools. This makes for quick-and-easy cleaning and relubing but also a more compact shape if you need to pack a bike into a travel case. Despite the apparently light press-fit, Ritchey marketing director Sean Coffey insists that the design isn’t prone to creaking.

Much of ritchey's new phantom flange rear hub can be easily disassembled by hand with no tools required: much of ritchey's new phantom flange rear hub can be easily disassembled by hand with no tools required

The new Phantom Flange rear hub can be easily disassembled for easier servicing or more compact packing in a travel case

Ritchey will build Phantom Flange into three new road wheelsets for 2014: the WCS Carbon Apex 38mm Tubulars ($1,830; 1,379g); the WCS Carbon 46mm Clinchers ($1,980; 1,526g); and the WCS Zeta II Clinchers ($950; 1,444g). European customers will also get an ultra-deep section WCS Carbon Apex 88mm tubular option. UK pricing was not immediately available.

Tubular rims are mostly carried over from previous model years but the Zeta II Clincher hoops are all new with a 17mm internal width, tubeless-compatible profiles, and an offset rear cross-section for a more evenly balanced spoke tension. Impressively for the sub-1,500g claimed weight, Ritchey builds the Zeta II Clinchers with durable brass spoke nipples instead of lighter – but more finicky – alloy ones.

The ritchey wcs zeta ii alloy clinchers are all new for 2014 with wide-profile tubeless-compatible rims and lightweight phantom flange hubs: the ritchey wcs zeta ii alloy clinchers are all new for 2014 with wide-profile tubeless-compatible rims and lightweight phantom flange hubs

The new Ritchey WCS Zeta II alloy clinchers get wide-profile, tubeless compatible rims along with the Phantom Flange hub design

All of the new road wheels will be available in December. Notably absent, however, are any disc brake-compatible versions or MTB variants. Coffey says that certain design elements of the Phantom Flange hubs will eventually work themselves into other wheel models, though.

New Vector Evo monorail saddle system

We can hear the complaints already: “another monorail saddle system?” Ritchey claims its Vector Evo design, however, builds in greater ride comfort than either the Selle Italia Monolink or SDG I-Beam while offering similar benefits in terms of weight and adjustability.

According to Coffey, the Vector Evo’s slightly curved thermoplastic rail is built to flex a bit, which in tandem with Ritchey’s split rear shell attachment design supposedly creates a sort of leaf spring setup to take the sting out of rough roads and trails. Selle Italia’s carbon fiber Monolink, on the other hand, is exceedingly rigid and was primarily built to allow for an extremely narrow saddle nose while SDG’s I-Beam rail is typically fully attached to the shell from nose to tail, allowing for little flex.

Ritchey's new vector evo saddles still incorporate the company's 'vector wing' style of rail attachment at the rear of the shell, which supposedly adds a measure of flex and comfort when riding on rough surfaces: ritchey's new vector evo saddles still incorporate the company's 'vector wing' style of rail attachment at the rear of the shell, which supposedly adds a measure of flex and comfort when riding on rough surfaces

Ritchey claims its new Vector Evo monorail saddle design offers benefits over similar systems

Even with the additional rail flex, though, Coffey claims that a specific goal of the Vector Evo design was to prevent long-term sagging, which can adversely affect a rider’s fit in as little as a few months depending on the saddle model. Since the flex is built into the rails, the Vector Evo shells are thicker and more rigid so as to better retain their shape over time.

“We wanted to come up with something where you’re not relying on excessive padding,” he told BikeRadar. “Vector Evo is designed to afford a level of compliance that you can’t get out of a traditional titanium or carbon fiber rail by distributing stress throughout the shell so that the shell can be the shell and the padding can be the padding.”

Thankfully, Ritchey’s Vector Evo saddle doesn’t necessarily require a wholly dedicated seatpost as the company’s current two-bolt ‘LINK’ posts can be retrofitted with a new top (incidentally, a Selle Italia Monolink-compatible clamp is available, too).

Current ritchey seatposts with the 'link' two-bolt head can be easily adapted to work with the company's vector evo monorail saddle system: current ritchey seatposts with the 'link' two-bolt head can be easily adapted to work with the company's vector evo monorail saddle system

Ritchey’s LINK seatpost range works with a variety of rail systems just by swapping the clamp head

Vector Evo is incorporated into two saddles for 2014: the narrower, flatter, and more sparsely padded WCS Vector Evo Streem (175g) and the wider, cushier, and curvier WCS Vector Evo Contrail (220g). Both retail for $150 (UK pricing not immediately available) and are available now.

Updated bars, stems, seatposts, tires, forks, and headsets

Ritchey has tweaked several of its most popular bars and stems, too.

The alloy WCS NeoClassic sports a similar traditional-bend shape to the extant WCS Classic but with a shorter 73mm reach and shallower 128mm drop – 7mm less than the Classic. Claimed weight creeps up to 253g (42cm) as compared to the standard Classic’s 220g but retail price stays constant at $90. For now, just the alloy version is available but Coffey suggests a carbon version is being considered.

The new ritchey wcs neoclassic bar features a similar traditional bend to the original classic but reach and drop have both been reduced by 7mm: the new ritchey wcs neoclassic bar features a similar traditional bend to the original classic but reach and drop have both been reduced by 7mm

Ritchey updates its traditional-bend alloy bar with a shorter reach and drop for 2014

Likewise, the much more anatomically shaped alloy WCS Streem gets a shorter 77mm reach and 128mm drop to become the WCS Streem II. The tops also get a more aggressively flattened cross-section. Claimed weight is 275g and suggested retail price is $110.

The new ritchey wcs streem ii gets a more thorough overhaul with a shorter reach and drop but also more aggressively shaped tops: the new ritchey wcs streem ii gets a more thorough overhaul with a shorter reach and drop but also more aggressively shaped tops

Prefer an anatomic bend? Ritchey’s revamped WCS Streem II gets a shorter reach and drop plus more aggressively shaped tops

Stem changes are mostly limited to a couple of additional sizes. The forged aluminum WCS C260 stem ($120, 103g) will be offered in a -25? angle while the WCS Trail stem ($100) now comes as short as 45mm.

Seatposts are essentially carried over but there’s one neat new optional add-on: a plastic plug that adapts current aluminum and carbon fiber seatposts to work with Shimano’s new Di2 internal battery.

Ritchey has devised a cleverly simple way to secure shimano's new internal di2 batteries inside its seatposts. best of all, it's only us$10 and will likely fit in other brands' seatposts, too: ritchey has devised a cleverly simple way to secure shimano's new internal di2 batteries inside its seatposts. best of all, it's only us$10 and will likely fit in other brands' seatposts, too

Ritchey will offer this simple Shimano Di2 internal battery adapter for just $10

New tire options for 2014 include the return of a high-end road slick and a new 27.5″ MTB model. The new Race Slick lays a single-compound layer of 60a rubber over a nylon casing and will available in WCS (700×23c and 700×25c with 120TPI casing, $40) and Comp (700×23c only with 60TPI casing, $20), both with folding aramid fiber beads. Fans of Ritchey’s evergreen WCS mountain bike tread will get new 27.5″ options, too.

Intriguingly, Ritchey has partnered with German output Acros for its new Block Lock Headset, which features an additional steerer clamp with a protruding, interlocking tab that limits movement to +/-90 degrees to prevent frame damage in a crash. Ritchey will offer the new headset in both tapered and standard sizes for $80.

Finally, there’s the all-new WCS Carbon Disc CX – a dedicated disc-only fork specifically designed for cyclocross with a 395mm axle-to-crown length, 45mm rake, and competitive 460g weight. Ritchey will offer the new fork only with a straight 1 1/8in steerer, which combined with the sleek shape should make it a better visual fit for metal frames – read into that as you will.

Ritchey has announced a new all-carbon disc fork designed specifically for cyclocross. unfortunately, though, it won't be available until february: ritchey has announced a new all-carbon disc fork designed specifically for cyclocross. unfortunately, though, it won't be available until february

Look but don’t touch – Ritchey’s all-new disc-specific carbon ‘cross fork won’t be available in time for this season

Retail price is still to be determined but that’s just as well since you won’t be able to buy one in time for this year’s cyclocross season anyway. The new fork won’t be available until early February.


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