over-the-edge

In rain and sun, the BRAIN Dealer Tour comes to Colorado’s Grand Valley

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (BRAIN) — The BRAIN Dealer Tour is visting stores and suppliers here this week, pedaling between stops in glorious sun and cold rain

By admin on May 18, 2017 | Electric Bike
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Jenny Rissveds’ winning mental and physical training strategies

Winning an Olympic Gold Medal in cross-country mountain biking takes dedication, training and preparation. BikeRadar caught up with Scott-Odlo rider Jenny Rissveds, who added a Gold at Rio to her Under 23 World Champion title this year, to discover some of the mental and physical training techniques and strategies she uses to perform to the highest level. 

  • Best women’s mountain bike: a buyer’s guide to help you choose the right bike for you
  • Six of the best women’s mountain bike saddles
  • 9 steps to your own life-changing adventure

It goes without saying that as an athlete at the top of her game, Rissveds spends a lot of time preparing physically for the rigours of cross country racing. Speaking to the Olympic champion, who has a calm demeanour and a practical, measured approach to racing, it’s also clear that mental preparation is a very important part of her training, and one that she credits no small part of her success to.

Mental preparation

1. Bring in expert help

“As a top athlete, you want to overcome everything on your own. You don’t need any help from anybody else. I think that’s what makes you better, but sometimes you have to accept that you can’t manage everything by yourself.” Rissveds tells BikeRadar, and her views on this are borne out of a shocking incident in her riding history.

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I had a really bad crash on some steep switchbacks. I slipped out and fell over the edge, and was stuck in a tree on the other side. If that tree hadn’t been there, I’d have been finished

“I used to do road races as well, and I was at the Junior European champs in Italy when I had a really bad crash on some steep switchbacks. I slipped out and fell over the edge, and was stuck in a tree on the other side. If that tree hand’t been there, I’d have been finished.

“After that I struggled a lot. I was so scared on the bike. I didn’t want to ride any more; it was a tough time. So I started working with a mental coach. In the beginning, I told him ‘I don’t need your help, I can do this on my own.’ But he sees stuff in a completely different way, from a different point of view. When I first started to understand this, and tried to think in the same way as he thinks, I started to see positive outcomes.”

It’s self-evident that this approach has worked for Rissveds. From a deep and understandable fear that began with a terrifying experience, she has worked with her coach to develop strategies and techniques that have not only overcome those concerns, but also helped her improve her performance. 

2. The power of visualisation

3. Focus on performance, not position

4. Make a plan, but be adaptable

Physical preparation

1. The importance of the off-season

2. Cross training is important, both for fitness and motivation

3. Adapt and evolve your training

4. Consider a training camp (but don’t forget to work beforehand)

  • How to get the most from your cycle training camp

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Jenny Rissveds’ winning mental and physical training strategies

Winning an Olympic Gold Medal in cross-country mountain biking takes dedication, training and preparation. BikeRadar caught up with Scott-Odlo rider Jenny Rissveds, who added a Gold at Rio to her Under 23 World Champion title this year, to discover some of the mental and physical training techniques and strategies she uses to perform to the highest level. 

  • Best women’s mountain bike: a buyer’s guide to help you choose the right bike for you
  • Six of the best women’s mountain bike saddles
  • 9 steps to your own life-changing adventure

It goes without saying that as an athlete at the top of her game, Rissveds spends a lot of time preparing physically for the rigours of cross country racing. Speaking to the Olympic champion, who has a calm demeanour and a practical, measured approach to racing, it’s also clear that mental preparation is a very important part of her training, and one that she credits no small part of her success to.

Mental preparation

1. Bring in expert help

“As a top athlete, you want to overcome everything on your own. You don’t need any help from anybody else. I think that’s what makes you better, but sometimes you have to accept that you can’t manage everything by yourself.” Rissveds tells BikeRadar, and her views on this are borne out of a shocking incident in her riding history.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

I had a really bad crash on some steep switchbacks. I slipped out and fell over the edge, and was stuck in a tree on the other side. If that tree hadn’t been there, I’d have been finished

“I used to do road races as well, and I was at the Junior European champs in Italy when I had a really bad crash on some steep switchbacks. I slipped out and fell over the edge, and was stuck in a tree on the other side. If that tree hand’t been there, I’d have been finished.

“After that I struggled a lot. I was so scared on the bike. I didn’t want to ride any more; it was a tough time. So I started working with a mental coach. In the beginning, I told him ‘I don’t need your help, I can do this on my own.’ But he sees stuff in a completely different way, from a different point of view. When I first started to understand this, and tried to think in the same way as he thinks, I started to see positive outcomes.”

It’s self-evident that this approach has worked for Rissveds. From a deep and understandable fear that began with a terrifying experience, she has worked with her coach to develop strategies and techniques that have not only overcome those concerns, but also helped her improve her performance. 

2. The power of visualisation

3. Focus on performance, not position

4. Make a plan, but be adaptable

Physical preparation

1. The importance of the off-season

2. Cross training is important, both for fitness and motivation

3. Adapt and evolve your training

4. Consider a training camp (but don’t forget to work beforehand)

  • How to get the most from your cycle training camp

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

How to drop into downslopes in 4 simple-to-learn steps

Dropping on to a downslope can be fairly intimidating, because you often can’t spot the landing until you’re in the air. Before attempting a drop to a downslope, we recommend that you’re comfortable hitting drops at slow speeds, and you’re also confident on steep gradients.

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In nearly every case it’s best to ‘squash’ the drop so you’re actually making it smaller and not travelling as far through the air and further away from the landing. The aim is to get your bodyweight dropping just as you go over the lip, so good timing is essential – too early and your front wheel will dive too late and you’ll launch rather than drop.

How to drop into downslopes

1. The approach

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Stand in your neutral position and stay loose and relaxed, because you’re going to need to be dynamic very soon! As you get closer, look for the landing but keep your head up.

2. Drop and push

As you approach the edge, drop your body and push the bike forwards with your arms. You need to time this so your bike is unweighted over the edge.

3. Extend your legs

4. Compress as you land

Points to remember

  • Get your speed right: Set your speed early so you have time to prepare yourself. Roll into the drop at a medium pace to start with – once you’re comfortable, you can hit it slower or faster.
  • Don’t lean back: Don’t confuse getting low with leaning back. Think about pushing the bike forwards and dropping your hips. This may look like you’re leaning back but you’re definitely not. The rear wheel should be unweighted as you go over the edge.
  • Be positive and focus: Concentrate on what you have to do. If you have any negative thoughts or doubts in your head, find a way to overcome them and focus on what you need to do before attempting the drop.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Over the Edge Sports opens fourth location, this time in Tahoe

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. (BRAIN) — Retailer Over the Edge Sports will have a grand opening for its newest location, in South Lake Tahoe, Calif., on Friday, May 22. Over the Edge’s other locations are in mountain bike hotbeds of Fruita, Colo., Hurricane, Utah, and Melrose, Australia.