Nuts

Mechanics association plans technical workshops in three cities

Three-day workshops planned for Denver, Portland and Washington, DC.-area. AUSTIN, Texas (BRAIN) — The Professional Bicycle Mechanics Association has opened registration for three-day technical workshops to be held this fall and next spring in three cities. The organization said the workshops are being designed to bolster individual mechanics’ skills while growing their business acumen.  They will be held in Denver, Nov

Fit Symposium returns to Interbike

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, Calif. (BRAIN) — Interbike has released the content schedule for its third annual Fit Symposium, which will be held in Las Vegas the day prior to the opening of this year’s Interbike Expo

State Bicycle offers ‘Simpsons’-themed product range

Mmmmmmm, doughnuts. TEMPE, Ariz

Turner Flux features DW-link, forgoes Boost and multiple wheel trends

MURRIETA, Calif. (BRAIN) — The Turner Flux is a carbon fiber “trail ripper” with 120mm of rear travel. The company said it was designed to offer a lively and flickable ride, with 650b wheels, DW-link suspension, modern geometry and standard (142×12) rear axle spacing.

Turner Flux features DW-link, forgoes Boost and multiple wheel trends

MURRIETA, Calif. (BRAIN) — The Turner Flux is a carbon fiber “trail ripper” with 120mm of rear travel. The company said it was designed to offer a lively and flickable ride, with 650b wheels, DW-link suspension, modern geometry and standard (142×12) rear axle spacing.

Nicolai Ion GPI – the gearbox MTB of the future?

With the Ion GPI, Nicolai has melded properly forward thinking geometry with a revolutionary drivetrain that does away with the derailleur. So does this add up to a bike that lights the way for things to come? Based on a test day aboard the strange beast, the answer to that question is both yes and no.

Related: Mojo/Nicolai’s GeoMetron plots a future for mountain bike design

We’ve written before about the GeoMetron, the fruit of a collaboration between German frame builders Nicolai and the boundary-pushing boss of Mojo Suspension, Chris Porter.

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A 12 speed Pinion gearbox delivers power to the rear wheel via a Gates Carbon belt drive

In a nutshell, the GeoMetron takes the basic outline of Nicolai’s 155mm rear travel Ion 16 and pairs it to geometry that’s slack enough be on the more radical edge of current World Cup downhill bikes despite only running a 160-180mm fork and being firmly designed as a do-it-all trail bike. It also has a much longer reach than most bikes on the market paired to a very steep seat angle.

Utterly different suspension performance

Shifting snags bar the path to greatness

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Specialized licenses Hed’s patent for aero rim shape

ROSEVILLE, Minn. (BRAIN) — Specialized and Hed Cycling announced that the two companies are collaborating on product development and that Specialized is licensing Hed’s patent for aerodynamic rim shaping and design.

Specialized licenses Hed’s patent for aero rim shape

ROSEVILLE, Minn. (BRAIN) — Specialized and Hed Cycling announced that the two companies are collaborating on product development and that Specialized is licensing Hed’s patent for aerodynamic rim shaping and design. The patent, No

Cruiser brand 3G Bikes expands with urban and city models

WHITTIER, Calif. (BRAIN) — 3G Bikes is offering three new models in the urban/city category, to complement its beach cruiser bike models. The new G’Linda and Melrose women’s bikes and the Chicago men’s bike are designed to offer dealers high margins with attractive retail price points

How to service a Fox fork – video

For suspension forks to work effectively they need to be in as friction-free an environment as possible. That sounds easy enough until you consider the grubby places we mountain bikers ride our machines.

Given the relatively low weights and forces at work when riding a mountain bike off-road (in comparison with, say, aircraft undercarriage struts on landing) the fork has to be clean and well lubed if it is to be able to move rapidly enough to isolate you from the shocks.

To keep the outside out and the insides nice and oily, forks are fitted with seals. Telescopic forks usually have upper leg ‘stanchions’ and lower leg ‘sliders’, and the two pieces should move over each other with minimal effort. Servicing your fork’s seals reguarly will keep it running smoothly.

In the video below, BikeRadar’s James Tennant explains how to perform this procedure, which is known as a 30-hour service. He’s using a Fox 34 air-sprung fork, but the method applies to all Fox air sprung forks. It’s important to note that this does not replace the annual service that your local Fox centre should perform.?

How to service a Fox fork

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Video: How to service a Fox fork

Related: How to service a Fox shock

Tools needed

  • Sockets
  • Mallet
  • Fox Float Fluid
  • Suspension fluid
  • Hex keys
  • A large syringe, or some other way of measuring liquid
  • Pick
  • Rag
  • Degreaser
  • Paper cloth
  • Gloves

Remove the lowers

Clamp the fork in a workstand, unscrew the valve cap and release all the air from the fork.

Use a 2mm hex key to undo the lug screw from the rebound or compression dial : use a 2mm hex key to undo the lug screw from the rebound or compression dial

Then use a 2mm hex key to undo the lug screw from the rebound or compression dial depending on what what fork you have.

Use a socket to remove the nut from the right-hand leg. Socket sizes will vary, and some forks may use crush washers, which you can usually reuse. Do the same for the other leg, before returning the nuts to the thread.

You now need to tap out the internals – many people recommend using a drift for this, but as long as you are very careful, you can use a socket and mallet to release the internals from the leg.

You now need to tap out the internals: you now need to tap out the internals

Position a tray or bucket under the fork to collect any suspension fluid that may leak.

Place the socket on the end of the nut, making sure it’s not in contact with any part of the fork internal.

Take a soft mallet and gently tap the socket until the thread is released. Be extremely careful while doing this – if you bend one of the rods, it will be expensive to replace.

One the internals are free you can remove the fork lowers, then wipe down the internals with paper cloth: one the internals are free you can remove the fork lowers, then wipe down the internals with paper cloth

Once the internals are free, you can remove the fork lowers. Let the excess fluid drip away, then wipe down the internals with paper cloth.

Clean the seals

Use a pick to remove the foam rings that sit just below the seals, in each leg.

Press the rings into paper cloth to remove any old suspension fluid and dirt, then immerse them in Float Fluid for a few minutes.

Use a pick to remove the foam rings that sit just just below the seals, then press them into paper cloth to remove old suspension fluid and dirt. then immerse them in float fluid for a few minutes: use a pick to remove the foam rings that sit just just below the seals, then press them into paper cloth to remove old suspension fluid and dirt. then immerse them in float fluid for a few minutes

While the rings are soaking, you can get to work on cleaning out the inside of each leg. Spray in some degreaser, then use a rag wrapped around a long, thin item such as a large hex key to ensure that there is no dirt inside, or around the seals.

…then use a rag wrapped around a long, thin item such as a large hex key to ensure that there is no dirt inside, or around the seals: …then use a rag wrapped around a long, thin item such as a large hex key to ensure that there is no dirt inside, or around the seals

Finally, carefully return the saturated foam rings to the seals – the Float Fluid will be used to lubricate the fork stanchion.

Replace the lowers

Return the fork lowers and wipe off any excess fluid.

Use a syringe to insert the correct volume of suspension oil in each leg – take a look at the Fox oil volume chart if you are unsure. Remember, this is suspension oil, not Float Fluid.

Use a syringe to insert the correct volume of suspension oil (not float fluid) into each leg: use a syringe to insert the correct volume of suspension oil (not float fluid) into each leg

Compress the fork fully and refit the nuts, not forgetting any crush washers you may have removed earlier.

Retighten the nuts, being careful not to over-tighten them – check for the correct torque values on Fox’s website, and use a torque wrench if you have one available.

Compress the fork fully and refit the nuts. use a torque wrench if you have one available: compress the fork fully and refit the nuts. use a torque wrench if you have one available

Finally, refit any dials you may have removed.

You now need to pump 10-20psi of air into the fork, and give it a few compressions, in order to circulate the oil around the internals.?

After that, you’re ready to set your sag and ride. If you’re not sure how, our guide will help you.