massachusetts

Street Life Update

From Livable Streets

Weigh In on the Massachusetts Pedestrian Plan

Image: The Boston Globe

A draft plan of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation’s statewide Pedestrian Transportation Plan is available for public comment through October 17th. We need you to give feedback in order to make the plan as strong as it can be. Review the plan here and act now!

City of Boston Releases Vision Zero Update

Image: WalkUP Roslindale

Earlier this month, the City of Boston released a 2017/2018 Vision Zero Update, tracking their progress in reducing fatal and severe crashes, and summarizing their progress on safety improvement policies and projects. In addition, the City announced five new Neighborhood Slow Streets zones, which will receive traffic calming measures and safety improvements that will provide visual and physical cues to slow drivers to 20 mph.

The Massachusetts Vision Zero Coalition will be releasing a third annual progress report for the City of Boston in early 2019. The Coalition is committed to reviewing the City’s performance annually to ensure public accountability in reaching its goals. To read the Coalition’s 2016 and 2017 reports, click here, and stay tuned for the 2018 report.

If you are interested in learning more about Vision Zero efforts around the country, check out the Vision Zero Cities conference taking place in NYC on November 7 and 8.

Get in the Zone at Our October Advocacy Committee Meeting

AdvocacyCommitteeWalk.png

What is zoning and transit-oriented development (TOD)? How does it affect you, your neighborhood, and what gets built (or not built)?

Join us at our next Advocacy Committee meeting on Wednesday, October 24th as we welcome Jarred Johnson of Transit Matters/Codman Square CDC and a guest from the City of Somerville (currently undergoing a citywide re-zoning process) to shed light on all things zoning and TOD. Learn more about current zoning and displacement issues in Metro Boston, as well as tips for better advocacy in this space that intersects so closely with transportation issues.

RSVP to let us know you can join us!

Register for Our Upcoming StreetTalks

Seats are filling up fast for our two upcoming StreetTalks. RSVP now to reserve your space!

Broken Buses + Incomplete Streets: Addressing Inequity in our Transportation System

Everyone in Metro Boston deserves safe, affordable, and reliable transportation options, but communities of color have been chronically neglected when it comes to prioritizing improvements on our streets. Join us for our fall StreetTalk where we will discuss why and how city transportation planning needs to address these systemic inequities head-on.

Event Details:
Thursday, October 25, 2018, 5:30-8:30 pm
@ Roxbury Innovation Center, Think Space
2300 Washington Street, Boston 02119

RSVP

StreetTalk 10-in-1

Join us for the 8th Annual StreetTalk 10-in-1 as we invite 10 innovative transportation and community thinkers to take the stage and share their big ideas. Enjoy 10 rapid-fire “TED”-style talks, with plenty of inspiration to be had! One of our most popular events of the year – don’t miss it!

Event Details:
Tuesday, December 4, 2018, 5:30-8:30 pm
@ Old South Meeting House
310 Washington Street, Boston 02108

RSVP

Job Opportunities

  • Manager of Fare Inspection Design, MBTA: The MBTA seeks a Manager for Fare Inspection Design to design the fare inspection process under a proof of payment system as part of a new Automated Fare Collection project. The successful candidate must demonstrate attention to detail, understanding of complex technological and policy issues, and ability to work on a cross-functional team. To learn more and apply, click here.
  • Director of Transition, AFC 2.0, MBTA:  The MBTA seeks an experienced manager to complete the transition of internal and external customers to the MBTA’s next-generation fare collection system, Automated Fare Collection (AFC) 2.0. The successful candidate must demonstrate a depth of experience in working across a large organization, with a wide range of stakeholder groups, working directly with the public, and marshalling resources toward a time-critical milestone. To learn more and apply, click here.
  • Various, City of Boston Transportation Department: The City of Boston is still hiring to fill 20 new positions! To learn more, click here.

BRAIN Dealer Tour tastes Kansas’ gravel on its final day

LAWRENCE, Kan. (BRAIN) — Forty-six miles of riding — a good dusty chunk of it on gravel roads — brought the BRAIN Dealer Tour crew to visit two shops Thursday. One store was less than two months old in a tiny town that happens to be along a popular cycling route.

Mavic’s Larry Burke leaves company to take a VP sales role at Polartec

BOSTON (BRAIN) — Larry Burke, an 18-year veteran at Mavic, has had a front-row seat during some of the most tumultuous changes in the global wheel business.

Latest Interbike podcast looks at BRAIN’s e-commerce survey

BRAIN's Lynette Carpiet joins retailers Tom Henry and Ken Woody Smith on the podcast, available Wednesday. LAGUNA HILLS, Calif

Sporting goods giant, Decathlon, taking another stab at US market

The France-based chain, with more than 1,300 stores globally, will offer its house-brand B'Twin bikes at U.S.

Hubway Is Dead Long Live Blue Bikes

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts will pay nearly $20 million to turn the Boston area’s Hubway bike share system into Blue Bikes and expand the program with more than 1,000 new bikes and more than 100 new rental stations across the region.

“Blue Cross is committed to helping Massachusetts residents lead healthy lives, and this program is a way to bring that to life,” said Jeff Bellows, vice-president of corporate citizenship for BCBS. “Being a health-care company, it’s in line with what we want to do.”

BCBS will pay $18 million over six years to be the sole sponsor of the bike share system, which will be renamed Blue Bikes. The money will be used in part to fund a nearly 50 percent increase in bikes — by the end of 2019, there will be 3,000 Blue Bikes on the streets, up from 1,800 today — and add more than 100 new stations across Boston, Cambridge, Brookline and Somerville. The expansion will bring more service to underserved parts of the city, Bellows said.

“Communities like Mattapan, Dorchester, Roxbury, they’re going to get additional access to these bikes,” he said. (via)

While I wish it was more of a public system, maybe tax based, but sure I will siphon off some of the obscene profits BCBS is making to fund bike share programs.

The best part of this is that Hubway/Blue Bikes will continue, and it will expand into areas that have not been served by it so far.

E-bike bill in Washington state heads to governor for signing

OLYMPIA, Wash. (BRAIN) — The Washington state Legislature passed a three-class e-bike bill (SB 6434) last night with an 86-12 vote (House), following a 44-2 vote out of the Senate. It defines Class 1, 2 and 3 e-bikes as bicycles with many of the same rights to the road, in particular bike path access for Class 1 and 2 e-bikes

Action: Ask Council Candidates To Sign Onto The Bike Safety Platform

From the email:

Contact City Council candidates and ask them to sign onto the Cambridge Bicycle Safety platform (text below) urging a more aggressive implementation of the 20 miles of protected lanes called for in the City’s Bike Plan, along with a specific timeline.

Friends,

What a tough yet inspiring year it has been for those of us who bike in and around Cambridge. After the tragic deaths of Amanda Phillips and Joe Lavins in 2016, thousands of Cambridge residents signed our petition calling for safer streets. The city responded by installing several new protected lanes, bringing the total to 4 miles throughout the Cambridge.

Unfortunately these segments remain disjointed and no clear plan for the future exists. To make matters worse, the latest update from city officials for today’s City Council meeting indicates they are only exploring one new segment of protected lanes (along Mass Ave) and provides no timeline for implementation. This simply does not meet the urgency that is required to avoid future tragedies and meet the city’s equity, Vision Zero, and climate neutrality goals.

Our streets still aren’t safe:

  • First responder data show a 23% increase in bicycle crashes in 2016 even as total crashes in the city have slightly decreased (see note below).
  • First responders are called to a crash involving a vehicle and bike every other day.
  • Intentional violence by road rage drivers is now commonplace due to poor street design.

Protected lanes are overwhelmingly popular and effective:

  • Over 3,000 people signed a petition calling for a protected network in Cambridge and hundreds more have sent thank you notes after new lanes were installed.
  • Participatory budgeting shows broad, continued support through a democratic process.
  • Protection and separation are the only ways to provide a safe space for people of all ages and abilities to bike. Safe spaces for biking are proven to result in higher numbers of bicyclists, helping the city achieve the mode shift necessary to reduce car dependency.
  • The number of young or inexperienced bicyclists is increasing: high school students in Cambridge counted more than 350 bicycles parked at the school earlier this year, and the high school athletes often use bikes to get from school to practice locations and home.

Cambridge is having municipal elections on November 7, and the make-up of the City Council will play a large role in the roll-out of badly needed infrastructure. This week we are asking all candidates to sign onto the Cambridge Bicycle Safety platform (see text below) urging a more aggressive implementation of the 20 miles of protected lanes called for in the City’s Bike Plan, along with a specific timeline.

Action alert – please take all three of these actions:

  1. Contact City Councillors and City Council candidates and encourage them to sign onto our election platform. Click here to email all council candidates at once. A quick email asking them to support the platform and a few words about why it matters to you will be perfect. If that link doesn’t work for you, a spreadsheet with Council candidates’ contact info is available here. Please copy info@cambridgebikesafety.org on your email.

  2. Attend the Climate Resilience Candidates Forum tomorrow evening (Tuesday, September 26, 6:30-9pm) and ask candidates to support making our streets safe for all users, the platform and improvements to safety on our streets.

  3. Register yourself to vote right now (deadline is soon). If you are already registered or are ineligible, please tell a friend to do so.

We’ll be updating you all soon with information regarding the candidates who signed our pledge, as well as summaries of those who responded to the Vision Zero election questionnaire we co-sponsored with the Vision Zero Massachusetts Coalition. (The full questionnaire responses are available here.)

As we head into this election season, it’ll be especially important to raise our voices and speak out for safer streets and quicker action. We are grateful for the progress that has been made, but know that much more needs to be done – and at a much faster pace – if we are to avoid future tragedies and encourage people of all ages and abilities to travel safely through the city by bike.

Note regarding crash data: Police Department crash data for 2015-2016 were downloaded from Cambridge Open Data (https://data.cambridgema.gov/). This data set is likely incomplete and does not include crashes for which first responders were not called.

Sincerely,
The CBS Core Team

Cambridge Bicycle Safety Platform for the 2017 Council Election

There are over 200 miles of streets in Cambridge. The 2015 Bicycle Plan calls for protected bike lanes on approximately 20 miles of major thoroughfares to create a safe, city-wide protected network that serves residents of all ages and abilities. Approximately 4 miles of these protected bike lanes have been installed. I will vote for a municipal ordinance that requires the city to install at least 4 miles of pop-up protected bike lanes each year until the city-wide protected network is complete and to install permanent protected bike lanes when the streets specified as part of the city-wide protected network are reconstructed.

Move into complete builds ramps up Parlee’s business

LAS VEGAS (BRAIN) — Parlee started out as a custom framebuilder, then added Asian-sourced stock sizes. But when the company added complete bike builds to its offerings, it hit a hot spot for dealers

Move into complete builds ramps up Parlee’s business

LAS VEGAS (BRAIN) — Parlee started out as a custom framebuilder, then added Asian-sourced stock sizes. But when the company added complete bike builds to its offerings, it hit a hot spot for dealers.