improvement

Dorel to investors: Bike biz will improve in 2018

Company says inventory levels are right and new sporting goods business should give it a boost. MONTREAL (BRAIN) — Dorel reported 0.6 percent growth in fourth-quarter revenue at its bike division, which includes Cannondale, Sugoi, GT, Schwinn, Mongoose and Caloi. However, full-year revenue declined 7.8 percent

Dorel Sports: Third-quarter, YTD revenues down

IBDs are holding off on big preseason buys, company says. In weak market, division focuses on improving its margins, internal operations. MONTREAL (BRAIN) — Dorel’s bike division reported a drop in third-quarter revenue of $15.8 million, or 5.9 percent, and a year-to-date revenue decrease of $42.8 million, or 5.7 percent.

Specialized Foundation expands middle school bike program

Schools can apply for fall; application period ends April 16. MORGAN HILL, Calif.

New BRAIN features Bill Austin tribute, used bike market news, and Sales Training Guide

? LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. (BRAIN) — Longtime industry leader Bill Austin is being remembered for his tireless work for the improvement of the IBD industry, as well as his mentorship to many across the industry and leadership at some of the industry’s most storied brands.

Bikes Infrastructure Makes Traffic Run Smoother

In Manhattan they did anyway, with the help of more pedestrians and higher transit rates, as well as the new bike share program.

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After several blocks in the heart of Times Square were pedestrianized and protected bike lanes were added to five avenues in the middle of Manhattan, motor vehicle traffic is actually moving more smoothly than before, according to the latest release of NYC DOT’s annual Sustainable Streets Index PDF.

The report, which gathers data from the MTA, the Taxi and Limousine Commission, and DOT’s own counts, also shows that the volume of traffic entering Manhattan has basically stayed flat since 2009. At the same time, transit ridership has started to rebound from the recession and service cuts.

Even with population and employment levels increasing after the recession, car traffic into the Manhattan CBD declined 1.7 percent in 2011. Since 2003, traffic volumes are down 6.5 percent, while transit trips to the area have increased 11.3 percent.

The annual report incorporates numbers on bike-share usage. Between the Memorial Day launch and August 26, Citi Bike riders made more than 2.5 million trips covering more than 5.5 million miles. There have been eight crashes involving Citi Bikes, none causing injuries classified as serious. Of stations sampled during the final two weeks of July, the busiest included those near hubs like Grand Central Terminal and Union Square.

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Read the rest of this fascinating article here. It seems obvious that if you take a bunch of people out of cars and instead they take public transit/ride a bike/ or walk that traffic would move better, but its always nice to see some real world data to prove it.

What I think is the real take home from this study is that peoples lives are improving.  They are being more healthy (even public transit is healthier than driving).  They are saving money, they are reducing their impact on the planet, and even the people who are still trapped in their cars are happier because traffic is moving smoothly.  I honestly wouldn’t be surprised if they were happier as well.  Its a win win win win.

People defend cars, and get very upset when you try to make it harder to use them, but they really have so very few benefits and so very many drawbacks.  I think what we are seeing is that this fact is finally sinking in.

Thanks Ben for the heads up on this.

Rutherford Ave To Be Upgraded

From Livable Streets:

——————————–

Rutherford Ave to become more livable!   

You spoke up, wrote letters, and attended meetings, and the City of Boston listened. Thank you.

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*Photo Credit: Rutherford Corridor Coaltion
Photo credit: Rutherford Corridor Improvement Coaliton (RCIC)

This week, the City of Boston announced that it will reclaim Rutherford Avenue as a true city street, one that is pedestrian and bicycle-friendly, and that knits neighborhoods together instead of splitting them apart. The new surface option design will include:

  • Safe pedestrian crossings and connections between the neighborhood and MBTA Orange Line stations.
  • 50 feet of green, open space to serve as a buffer between traffic and neighborhood homes.
  • Parcels for new housing at Sullivan Square.
  • The connection of the Mystic River waterfront to the Charles River.
  • The elimination of underpasses at Austin Street and at Sullivan Square, and the re-introduction of surface streets with signalized intersections to manage traffic flow.
  • The inclusion of enough traffic lanes to continue to provide for smooth traffic flow and protect Charlestown from cut-through traffic.
  • The extension of Spice Street to Rutherford Avenue to allow for Cambridge Street traffic to bypass the rotary area.

Thank you City of Boston! Later this year, the City will start a design process to

develop the final design. See full City of Boston press release here >>>

Gerald Robbins of RCIC presenting at StreetTalk 10 in 1, Dec 2012

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Since 2008 (link to letter), we have been working with dozens of partners, and most recently the Rutherford Corridor Improvement Coalition (RCIC), for a more livable Rutherford Ave. In 2008, the City of Boston began a project to rethink and redesign Rutherford Avenue and Sullivan Square in Charlestown. Since 2008, we have been asking you to speak up. Thanks for all your hard work and support. Today we celebrate.

Rutherford Ave To Be Upgraded

From Livable Streets:

——————————–

Rutherford Ave to become more livable!   

You spoke up, wrote letters, and attended meetings, and the City of Boston listened. Thank you.

?

*Photo Credit: Rutherford Corridor Coaltion
Photo credit: Rutherford Corridor Improvement Coaliton (RCIC)

This week, the City of Boston announced that it will reclaim Rutherford Avenue as a true city street, one that is pedestrian and bicycle-friendly, and that knits neighborhoods together instead of splitting them apart. The new surface option design will include:

  • Safe pedestrian crossings and connections between the neighborhood and MBTA Orange Line stations.
  • 50 feet of green, open space to serve as a buffer between traffic and neighborhood homes.
  • Parcels for new housing at Sullivan Square.
  • The connection of the Mystic River waterfront to the Charles River.
  • The elimination of underpasses at Austin Street and at Sullivan Square, and the re-introduction of surface streets with signalized intersections to manage traffic flow.
  • The inclusion of enough traffic lanes to continue to provide for smooth traffic flow and protect Charlestown from cut-through traffic.
  • The extension of Spice Street to Rutherford Avenue to allow for Cambridge Street traffic to bypass the rotary area.

Thank you City of Boston! Later this year, the City will start a design process to

develop the final design. See full City of Boston press release here >>>

Gerald Robbins of RCIC presenting at StreetTalk 10 in 1, Dec 2012

?

Since 2008 (link to letter), we have been working with dozens of partners, and most recently the Rutherford Corridor Improvement Coalition (RCIC), for a more livable Rutherford Ave. In 2008, the City of Boston began a project to rethink and redesign Rutherford Avenue and Sullivan Square in Charlestown. Since 2008, we have been asking you to speak up. Thanks for all your hard work and support. Today we celebrate.

Rutherford Ave To Be Upgraded

From Livable Streets:

——————————–

Rutherford Ave to become more livable!   

You spoke up, wrote letters, and attended meetings, and the City of Boston listened. Thank you.

?

*Photo Credit: Rutherford Corridor Coaltion
Photo credit: Rutherford Corridor Improvement Coaliton (RCIC)

This week, the City of Boston announced that it will reclaim Rutherford Avenue as a true city street, one that is pedestrian and bicycle-friendly, and that knits neighborhoods together instead of splitting them apart. The new surface option design will include:

  • Safe pedestrian crossings and connections between the neighborhood and MBTA Orange Line stations.
  • 50 feet of green, open space to serve as a buffer between traffic and neighborhood homes.
  • Parcels for new housing at Sullivan Square.
  • The connection of the Mystic River waterfront to the Charles River.
  • The elimination of underpasses at Austin Street and at Sullivan Square, and the re-introduction of surface streets with signalized intersections to manage traffic flow.
  • The inclusion of enough traffic lanes to continue to provide for smooth traffic flow and protect Charlestown from cut-through traffic.
  • The extension of Spice Street to Rutherford Avenue to allow for Cambridge Street traffic to bypass the rotary area.

Thank you City of Boston! Later this year, the City will start a design process to

develop the final design. See full City of Boston press release here >>>

Gerald Robbins of RCIC presenting at StreetTalk 10 in 1, Dec 2012

?

Since 2008 (link to letter), we have been working with dozens of partners, and most recently the Rutherford Corridor Improvement Coalition (RCIC), for a more livable Rutherford Ave. In 2008, the City of Boston began a project to rethink and redesign Rutherford Avenue and Sullivan Square in Charlestown. Since 2008, we have been asking you to speak up. Thanks for all your hard work and support. Today we celebrate.

Rutherford Ave To Be Upgraded

From Livable Streets:

——————————–

Rutherford Ave to become more livable!   

You spoke up, wrote letters, and attended meetings, and the City of Boston listened. Thank you.

?

*Photo Credit: Rutherford Corridor Coaltion
Photo credit: Rutherford Corridor Improvement Coaliton (RCIC)

This week, the City of Boston announced that it will reclaim Rutherford Avenue as a true city street, one that is pedestrian and bicycle-friendly, and that knits neighborhoods together instead of splitting them apart. The new surface option design will include:

  • Safe pedestrian crossings and connections between the neighborhood and MBTA Orange Line stations.
  • 50 feet of green, open space to serve as a buffer between traffic and neighborhood homes.
  • Parcels for new housing at Sullivan Square.
  • The connection of the Mystic River waterfront to the Charles River.
  • The elimination of underpasses at Austin Street and at Sullivan Square, and the re-introduction of surface streets with signalized intersections to manage traffic flow.
  • The inclusion of enough traffic lanes to continue to provide for smooth traffic flow and protect Charlestown from cut-through traffic.
  • The extension of Spice Street to Rutherford Avenue to allow for Cambridge Street traffic to bypass the rotary area.

Thank you City of Boston! Later this year, the City will start a design process to

develop the final design. See full City of Boston press release here >>>

Gerald Robbins of RCIC presenting at StreetTalk 10 in 1, Dec 2012

?

Since 2008 (link to letter), we have been working with dozens of partners, and most recently the Rutherford Corridor Improvement Coalition (RCIC), for a more livable Rutherford Ave. In 2008, the City of Boston began a project to rethink and redesign Rutherford Avenue and Sullivan Square in Charlestown. Since 2008, we have been asking you to speak up. Thanks for all your hard work and support. Today we celebrate.

Cantitoe Road BioFloat seatpost prototype – First look

Elastomer-equipped seatposts are nothing new. But where Specialized has used the idea to damp vibration transmitted through the shaft, and Thudbuster incorporates it as part of a proper suspension linkage, Cantitoe Road’s BioFloat seatpost directly isolates the saddle clamp cradle from the rest of the head. The good news is that it works. The bad news is that you can’t buy one – yet.

We weren’t expecting much from the BioFloat but several days of riding around our local Colorado and Nevada stomping grounds proved otherwise. Despite the seatpost’s modest appearance, we enjoyed a substantially smoother ride compared to a conventional rigid aluminum seatpost, and much more of an improvement than we would have expected from the switch from aluminum to carbon fiber.

Unlike with a suspension seatpost, though, you don’t notice the saddle moving beneath you and your saddle height doesn’t change. Instead, the BioFloat is remarkably adept at damping high-frequency vibration – that incessant buzz that often accompanies less-than-ideal pavement.?

There’s also some benefit on bigger potholes and asphalt cracks, which felt less jarring than usual. As the post’s name suggests, the feeling is more that you’re ‘floating’ across the pavement instead of just rolling over it.

“I realize mine is the perspective of the inventor but, nevertheless, I genuinely believe this represents a game changing development,” said Velimpex Marketing head Tom Petrie, who designed the BioFloat together with Salsa founder Ross Shafer. “The seatpost is no longer a static connection between the bike and the saddle whose only merits are aesthetics and weight. With the BioFloat, the seatpost becomes a dynamically compliant, tunable component.”

The biofloat head is bonded to a carbon fiber shaft but the improvement in ride quality during test rides was far more than we would have anticipated from the switch from aluminum to carbon fiber: the biofloat head is bonded to a carbon fiber shaft but the improvement in ride quality during test rides was far more than we would have anticipated from the switch from aluminum to carbon fiber

We noticed a remarkable amount of vibration damping?

Though we only sampled the BioFloat on the road, we can see some benefit of bringing the concept to the mountain bike and cyclocross categories, too.

There is somenoticeable movement if you’re sitting on the very front or back of the saddle, but it’s hardly objectionable in most situations. Cantitoe Road builds the BioFloat elastomer with a hexagonal exterior shape, to keep the insert from rotating but to allow the material to shear internally.

Interestingly, one of the benefits Cantitoe Road touts as a result of that movement is improved biomechanical efficiency, since the saddle is theoretically free to tilt side-to-side as needed to accommodate a rider’s pedaling motion. We didn’t notice any improvement in that department, though.

Currently, the BioFloat is still in the development stage, but even as an admittedly rough prototype it’s reasonably light at 284g (27.2×350mm) given the benefit. We’d expect a production version to shed a few grams while hopefully sporting a more elegant appearance.?

We’d also like to see the elastomer shape (and possibly its durometer) refined for more precisely controlled motion, and the simple single-bolt clamp will undoubtedly need to be redesigned to accommodate the non-cylindrical rails that are becoming increasingly common.

Otherwise, though, the Cantitoe Road BioFloat seatpost is a concept we’d like to see fully developed and released to the public. Keep your fingers crossed, folks.