impact

Specialized and Maxxis sign on for Impact Media Summit

KETCHUM, Idaho (BRAIN) — CrankTank has announced Specialized and Maxxis will attend its Impact Media Summit, planned for June 26-27 in Sun Valley.

Strong U.S. dollar softens Dorel Sports’ revenue

Challenging currency rates, sluggish fourth-quarter sales hurt profits.

Dorel’s bike business down in second quarter, first half

Decline in sales in Europe and North America, and foreign exchange losses impact earnings.

How to jump a mountain bike

Jumping isn’t just for adrenaline junkies – it’s a fundamental skill that every mountain biker can and should learn. And it’s not that difficult once you’ve got the hang of the techniques involved.

In the video below, MTB skills coach Sam from Pedal Progression shows you how it should be done:

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: how to jump

Step-by-step guide to jumping

Jumping is all about exerting pressure and your ability to control the timing of this pressure through each wheel.

First you need to make sure your pumping is up to scratch. Being able to generate speed without pedaling, by snapping your arms, legs and feet from bent to straight, is crucial to understanding how a bike gets airborne.??

The take-off

Find a jump that you’re comfortable with, roll in at a comfortable speed, out of the saddle. Keep your weight central, over both wheels, and lower your chest. Start to compress, and feel the force of the lip against your tyres.

Compress into the lip:

Treat each wheel as separate – deal with the front then the back – not both together. Slowly start to transfer your weight from your hands to your feet – the idea is that by the time the front wheel reaches the lip, there’s no weight pushing through it.

Transfer your weight from your hands to your feet, so that there's no weight pushing through the front wheel by the time it reaches the:

Pressing down and then releasing your weight through each wheel when jumping is the same as when you bunnyhop. In this case, the lip of a jump will provide all the lift your wheel will need to follow the trajectory of the jump. This means that jumping is a less explosive movement than a bunnyhop – the idea is to keep your head and core following a smooth arc by using your elbows, knees and ankles do the pushing.

x:

Weight transfer timings

The point at which you transfer your weight from your hands to your feet is very important. Imagine a line just past halfway up the lip of the jump – this is the point at which you need to change from pushing with your arms to pushing fully from your feet.

Imagine a line about halfway up the jump:

If you’re still pushing into the lip through your arms when you get to this line, you’ll end up getting bucked forwards and over the bars.

As the jumps get bigger or your bike’s suspension increases – this line moves further back.

The landing

Once you’re in the air, you can relax – the hardest part is done. Spot your landing and use your arms and legs to absorb the impact.

Use your arms and legs to absorb the impact:

Try to land both wheels at the same time. Touching down rear wheel first can cause the front to wash out, and steep front wheel landings could end up with you going over the bars.?

Try to land the front and rear wheels at the same time:

Then all you need to worry about on landing is staying off the brakes.

Jumping tips

  • Start by learning on a tabletop jump, rather than a double, because you’ll have a flat, safe area to land on if you mess up. Don’t go too big too soon.
  • If you’re struggling to jump using SPD pedals, try fitting some flats.
  • Play around with your timings too, to find what works best for you.


By admin on September 18, 2014 | Mountain Bikes
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mountain bike skills: how to jump

Jumping isn’t just for adrenaline junkies – it’s a fundamental skill that every mountain biker can and should learn. And it’s not that difficult once you’ve got the hang of the techniques involved.

In the video below, MTB skills coach Sam from Pedal Progression shows you how it should be done:

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

Video: how to jump

Step-by-step guide to jumping

Jumping is all about exerting pressure and your ability to control the timing of this pressure through each wheel.

First you need to make sure your pumping is up to scratch. Being able to generate speed without pedaling, by snapping your arms, legs and feet from bent to straight, is crucial to understanding how a bike gets airborne.??

The take-off

Find a jump that you’re comfortable with, roll in at a comfortable speed, out of the saddle. Keep your weight central, over both wheels, and lower your chest. Start to compress, and feel the force of the lip against your tyres.

Compress into the lip:

Treat each wheel as separate – deal with the front then the back – not both together. Slowly start to transfer your weight from your hands to your feet – the idea is that by the time the front wheel reaches the lip, there’s no weight pushing through it.

Transfer your weight from your hands to your feet, so that there's no weight pushing through the front wheel by the time it reaches the:

Pressing down and then releasing your weight through each wheel when jumping is the same as when you bunnyhop. In this case, the lip of a jump will provide all the lift your wheel will need to follow the trajectory of the jump. This means that jumping is a less explosive movement than a bunnyhop – the idea is to keep your head and core following a smooth arc by using your elbows, knees and ankles do the pushing.

x:

Weight transfer timings

The point at which you transfer your weight from your hands to your feet is very important. Imagine a line just past halfway up the lip of the jump – this is the point at which you need to change from pushing with your arms to pushing fully from your feet.

Imagine a line about halfway up the jump:

If you’re still pushing into the lip through your arms when you get to this line, you’ll end up getting bucked forwards and over the bars.

As the jumps get bigger or your bike’s suspension increases – this line moves further back.

The landing

Once you’re in the air, you can relax – the hardest part is done. Spot your landing and use your arms and legs to absorb the impact.

Use your arms and legs to absorb the impact:

Try to land both wheels at the same time. Touching down rear wheel first can cause the front to wash out, and steep front wheel landings could end up with you going over the bars.?

Try to land the front and rear wheels at the same time:

Then all you need to worry about on landing is staying off the brakes.

Jumping tips

  • Start by learning on a tabletop jump, rather than a double, because you’ll have a flat, safe area to land on if you mess up. Don’t go too big too soon.
  • If you’re struggling to jump using SPD pedals, try fitting some flats.
  • Play around with your timings too, to find what works best for you.








League hosts webinar on women’s impact on the bike business

WASHINGTON, D.C. (BRAIN) — The League of American Bicyclists will host a webinar Thursday that will delve into data and insights on the impact of female cyclists on the bicycle business. The webinar, part of the League’s Women Bike program, is one of a series of webinars covering everything from advocacy campaigns to business initiatives to get more women riding.

Scott’s 2015 helmet line prioritizes safety with MIPS

While many other new helmets are focusing on aerodynamics, ventilation, weight, and style, Scott Sports has opted to put rider safety above all else with six MIPS-equipped MTB, road, and urban models for 2015.

While traditional EPS (Expanded Polystyrene System) helmets are really only designed for straight-on impacts, MIPS (Multi-directional Impact Protection System) is said to provide additional protection for angled impacts that are more common in real-life crashes. MIPS is remarkably simple, consisting of a paper-thin, low-friction plastic liner that’s attached inside the usual EPS foam shell. This mimics the thin cushioning of cerebrospinal fluid inside your head and allows for a small amount of shear, or rotational, movement between the skull and brain.

MIPS may just seem like a layer of slippery plastic but its claimed effects on safety is impressive: mips may just seem like a layer of slippery plastic but its claimed effects on safety is impressive

MIPS (Multi-directional Impact Protection System)?consists of a thin layer of low-friction plastic that allows the helmet to move very slightly on your head upon impact

According to Scott, this movement is very slight – just 15mm – but it supposedly occurs within the first 15 milliseconds of impact and reduces the impact force that’s transmitted to the brain by up to 34 percent.

MIPS is incorporated into six Scott helmet models for 2015.

The Stego mountain bike helmet is aimed at the enduro scene with generous side and rear coverage plus an exterior that’s intentionally smooth so as not to catch on the ground in the event of a crash. There are just a handful of forward-facing vents but the internal channeling behind them is very wide and leads to generously sized exhaust ports that suggest good overall cooling capacity.

Scott will feature the mips system heavily in its helmet range for 2015. headlining the mountain bike collection is the enduro-focused stego with generous side and rear coverage: scott will feature the mips system heavily in its helmet range for 2015. headlining the mountain bike collection is the enduro-focused stego with generous side and rear coverage

The enduro-focused Stego features generous coverage on the sides and rear

Claimed weight for a medium size is 340g.

Next in the MIPS-equipped line is the ARX MTB Plus, which uses a more traditional XC-like shape and more generous venting relative to the Stego. The ARX MTB Plus uses the same height adjustable MRAS 2 retention system as the Stego, though, which features finer diameter adjustments for 2015.

Also included in scott's mips-equipped mountain bike helmets for 2015 are the taal (left) and arx mtb plus (right). not shown is the mips-equipped lin, which sits in between the two in terms of price: also included in scott's mips-equipped mountain bike helmets for 2015 are the taal (left) and arx mtb plus (right). not shown is the mips-equipped lin, which sits in between the two in terms of price

The MIPS-equipped ARX MTB Plus (right) features cross-country styling while the Taal (left) brings MIPS safety to a relatively low price level

Claimed weight for a medium ARX MTB Plus is 280g.

The Lin brings MIPS safety even further downstream. Scott equips this model with a simpler VRAS retention system and there’s less ventilation than on the ARX MTB Plus but claimed weight is the same at 280g for a medium size.

Finally on the MTB side is the Taal, which comes with an integrated bug net covering the forward-facing vents and the impact force-reducing MIPS liner but in a one-size-fits-all shell.

Scott will offer MIPS in a road model with the ARX Plus, which is essentially identical to the ARX MTB Plus but without the removable visor. Claimed weight for a medium size is 270g.

Scott also has a mips-equipped option for the road called the arx plus: scott also has a mips-equipped option for the road called the arx plus

Scott is offering MIPS on the road, too, with the ARX Plus

MIPS is even incorporated into the urban-focused Torus Plus. The thicker exterior shell brings the claimed weight up to 450g (size medium) but Scott says that was a conscious decision to improve the day-to-day durability. Fixed strap splitters make for a quicker fit and venting is rather minimal but the matte grey finish with tweed accents is awfully stylish.

MIPS is even included on an urban model called the torus plus: mips is even included on an urban model called the torus plus

The Torus Plus urban helmet is pretty heavy at 450g but it’s pretty stylish, too

Retail prices and availability for all of the new helmets are still to be announced.








Mountain bike suspension forks – a buyer’s guide

Mountain bike suspension forks vary massively when it comes to travel, shock damping ability, stiffness and weight?– and that’s before we even get onto price, which can run into hundreds or even thousands of pounds.

That means it’s important to know what to look for when buying a new fork.

What to think about when buying a fork

Travel

Mountain biking is a very diverse sport and there are suspension forks designed for every type of bike: cross-country bikes generally offer 80 to 120mm of suspension travel, trail bikes range from 120 to 140mm, enduro and all-mountain bikes have between 150 to 170mm, and gravity/downhill rigs go from 180 to 210mm.

The first question is, how much travel will work best for you? All other things being equal, the further your fork can move, the more smoothly it can absorb impacts. But longer-legged forks have to be heavier to cope with the extra leverage and bigger impacts.?

An extra 10mm of travel will tip head and seat angles back by roughly one degree, which makes steering slower and more stable. Running too long a fork can also overstress your frame and void the warranty, so always check what the recommended travel is for your bike before upgrading. In general, it’s best to replace your existing suspension fork with one with that offers a similar amount of suspension.

That said, many forks have travel-adjust features. These either let you drop the travel in small steps to tweak the bike’s geometry and handling to taste, or crush it down dramatically to give a shorter, stiffer fork.

Budget

The next question is budget. Sadly, there aren’t many budget forks that deliver a smooth suspension stroke and stiff, screw-through axle structure without weighing a ton. Damping circuits are also simpler on cheaper models, which means less control in high impact or multiple-hit situations.?

There’s a clear progression in standards of control and consistency up to around ?400 / US$670, but after that the waters get a lot murkier and it’s time to be honest about yourself and your riding.?The overall performance and reliability of basic forks has definitely improved though.

Control

The more travel you have, the harder it is to control – which makes damping control paramount. You should at least get adjustable rebound damping so the fork returns smoothly to its natural ride height, rather than bouncing back up with a clang. More advanced forks also have compression damping to help the spring slow down and absorb the impacts.

Top-end forks split compression damping into two separate circuits – low speed for controlling loads such as braking, cornering or movement under pedalling, or high speed for controlling sudden large loads such as square-edged rocks or landings. Having lots of damping adjustment is only useful if you know what you’re doing with it and have the time to tune it correctly though, so be honest rather than pretending that you’ll become a pro suspension fork tuner overnight.

If you’re likely to plug the fork in, do the minimum setup tweaking and then ride it day in, day out without servicing it then you’ll want a simple but totally reliable unit. If you clean and care as much as you ride, then you can get something a bit more needy. If you’re a real fork fettler who’ll spend hours with a shock pump and a safe cracker’s level of dial turning dexterity to find your suspension sweet spot then it’s worth having a full range of adjustments to exploit.?

Strength/weight

As well as travel and tuning, you need to think about how much strength you really need, or you’ll just be carrying extra weight you’ll never use.?Light, tight forks will suit climbers and other cross-country riders, while super-plush traction Hoovers are worth the extra weight for progressive envelope pushers. Getting the right balance is really important. Fork strength is hard to gauge though, so go by the manufacturer’s recommendations.

Compatibility

Most modern suspension forks use tapered steerer tubes which measure 1.5in at the crown and 1.125in at the stem.

There are also three different axle standards to consider: 9mm quick-releases can still be found on some lower end forks, though the majority of cross-country and trail forks now use 15mm thru-axles. Longer travel suspensions forks for enduro and downhill frequently use 20mm thru-axles.

Anatomy of a fork

  • Crown – Most mountain bike forks are?single-crown models, with just one cross brace (the crown) holding the two legs together below the head tube of your frame. Long-travel downhill bikes often have double-crown forks, with a second cross brace at the top of the head tube for added stiffness. Materials vary and some crowns are hollow for increased stiffness-to-weight performance.
  • Steerer tube – This is the upper tube of the fork that slides into the head tube. Most are alloy but steel (cheap) and carbon fibre (super-light but also super-expensive) steerers appear on some forks. Most forks use conventional 1 1/8in steerers but some use tapered or oversized versions for extra stiffness; these will only work with appropriately sized head tubes. We’d thoroughly recommend you use a tapered steerer if your bike is compatible.?
  • Spring – Air springs (essentially pressurized air chambers) are light and easy to adjust for different rider/ride preferences just by changing pressure, but resistance will always increase as they reach full compression. Metal coil springs are significantly heavier and less adjustable, but are invariably cheaper and they feel super-smooth, particularly over small bumps. Some forks use a primary air spring backed up by a coil spring or elastomer block used as a secondary negative spring or bottom-out bumper.
  • Legs – The telescopic legs are the moving structure of the fork. The lower legs are joined together by at least one brace to stop them moving independently. The upper legs (stanchions) have increased in sized dramatically in recent years, with up to 40mm diameters used to boost stiffness, especially on longer-travel forks. Lengths, wall thicknesses and external finishes vary. Seal heads are used to keep the internals clean. The stanchions house the spring on one side (usually left) and the damping on the other.
  • Damping – Without damping, forks would just bounce up and down on their springs. Fork movement is controlled by pushing oil through a series of valves and/or shims. By altering the size of the holes and the speed of the oil flowing from one side to the other, it’s possible to control, or ‘damp’, the impact. Compression damping controls the impact strike, while rebound controls the post-impact speed of the fork as it returns to its static length. High-speed damping deals with big, blunt trauma like boulders and landings from jumps. Low-speed damping controls smaller, slower-applied forces like pedalling bob or cornering/braking loads. Basic forks just have rebound damping, while advanced forks have separate damping circuits to handle different shaft and impact speeds.
  • Axle – Forks are increasingly being offered with 15mm or 20mm axles that slide right through the hub and screw or clamp into the fork leg. These increase fork tip stiffness and steering accuracy dramatically compared to traditional quick-release skewers, and they’re more secure, too. Cam systems like RockShox’s Maxle setup mean they’re just as quick to tighten/undo. You’ll need a compatible front wheel, but we’d still recommend a through-axle to anyone thinking of upgrading their fork.

Jargon buster

  • Air spring – Fork using compressed air to act as the spring.
  • Air assist – Air added to increase the effective spring rate of a coil spring.
  • Anodised – Alloy electrically coated with a hard wearing, coloured surface finish.
  • Bladder - A flexible ‘bag’ containing damping oil.
  • Blow-off – A valve that only opens when a preset impact load is exceeded.
  • Bottom-out - Full compression of the suspension.
  • Brace (or Arch) – The linking bridge between the two lower legs.
  • Bushings -?The slippery bearing blocks inside the lower legs that the stanchions slide up and down on.? ?
  • Cartridge - A self contained chamber. Generally used in forks to keep the damping oil isolated from lubricating oil and minimise contamination from muck or air, improving overall control consistency.
  • Cavitation - An air pocket or void in the oil causing a sudden loss of damping.
  • Circuit - The routing of damping oil through valves and holes.
  • Coil spring – A coil wound metal spring.
  • Compression – The shortening of the fork as it absorbs an impact.
  • Damping - The valve circuit that hydraulic oil is pushed through as the fork compresses and rebounds. This dissipates impact force into heat energy.
  • Dive – Under-damped suspension that rushes down through the compression stroke without absorbing much energy. Makes steering, braking and cornering feel very unpredictable.
  • Handlebar remote – A switch that sits on the handlebar and is linked to the fork by a cable.
  • High-speed forces: Impacts from blunt, square-edged objects or drop-offs that push the suspension through its stroke very quickly.
  • Knock – Any looseness or wobble found in the fork.
  • Linear - A very consistent resistance all through the travel.
  • Load - The force transmitted into the suspension by rocks, landings, etc.
  • Lockout – Compression damping cut-off that locks the fork at full height for more efficient climbing/sprinting on smooth surfaces.
  • Lockdown – Compression damping cut-off that locks the fork at either a partially or fully compressed height.
  • Low-speed forces?- Small, slowly-applied suspension loads caused by weight shift, cornering pressure and pedalling.??
  • Open bath – Damping system using free flowing oil that also acts as a lubricant for the bushings and stanchions. Harder to control consistently than cartridge oil flow, but more tolerant or oil leaks or other issues and therefore generally more reliable.
  • Platform - Low-speed compression damping that uses a preset ‘blow off’ load to control when it starts working.
  • Preload - Additional pressure applied to a coil or air spring to increase the load needed to start it moving.
  • Position sensitive damping – Damping that changes as the fork goes through its stroke.
  • Post Mount – Easily adjusted disc brake mount using twin threaded posts perpendicular to the brake rotor.
  • Progressive - Spring rate that increases as the fork compresses to full travel.
  • Ramp-up – When a spring offers increased resistance as it compresses.
  • Rebound – The return part of the fork stroke.
  • Screw-through – Hollow oversize axle that screws into the fork leg and is then secured with a tool-free cam mechanism.
  • Shaft speed – The speed at which the fork – and the damping piston shaft inside it – compresses.
  • Speed sensitive damping – Damping that changes depending on stroke speed during impact.
  • Spike - Sudden violent stop when the compression damping is unable to cope with high shaft speeds.
  • Spring rate – Load needed to compress the fork.
  • Square edge - A blunt-edged obstacle (like a boulder or big kerb) that pushes the fork through its travel fast.
  • Stanchion -?The upper fork tubes that the lower legs slide up and down on. Different manufacturers use different surface treatments to increase smoothness and reduce stiction.
  • Stiction - Friction between the upper and lower legs of the fork which makes it reluctant to move over bumps.
  • Top-out - The behaviour of the fork when it’s unloaded and extends to the very top of its stroke.
  • Travel – The maximum vertical distance the fork can compress to absorb an impact.?
  • Travel-adjustable – Fork whose compression stroke can be adjusted externally.








Trail Tech: Off the hook

If you’ve ever installed a tube or tubeless tire on your mountain bike you probably noticed the ridge of material at the top of the rim that juts several millimeters inward from the rim’s sidewall. It’s called the bead hook, and a growing number of carbon rim manufacturers are doing away with this feature in favor of rims designed with straight inner walls. Performance gains, durability and lowers manufacturing cost are all reasons company’s cite for moving away from this long-time rim feature.

Why? Let’s delve into the tech behind this trend.

What does a bead hook actually do?

The hooks on the sidewalls of bicycle rims came about as a way to center the tire around the rim while the tire was being inflated. They were initially developed as a way to hold road tires on the rims when inflating them to higher pressures.

Several things have happened since the bead hook was introduced more than 50 years ago that make it a vestige of our cycling past. The interface between tires and rims has become much more standardized. Rims now have central drop channels that aids inflation and in centering the tire on the rim. Many rims also have small ridges on either side of this drop channel, called the bead lock, that prevent the tire from shifting inwards while cornering. Last but certainly not least, the aramid or Kevlar material used for tire beads in significantly stronger and less prone to stretching than tires of the past.

In constrast with enve's new rims, the older version (shown here) had bead hooks but did not have the bead locks running down the center channel :

ENVE’s original rim design above used bead hooks; the company has recently moved away from them, citing higher impact strength and performance gains

What the bead hook doesn’t do is to prevent the tire from blowing off the rim or keep tubeless tires from burping.

Benefits of hookless mountain bike rims

Rims without bead hooks are nothing new, in fact they are standard for most automotive and motorcycle applications.

Specialized’s wheel brand, Roval, introduced carbon-rimmed wheelsets with hookless rim profiles last year. Within the last week ENVE and Ibis have also debuted new wheelset built with hookless carbon rims. The ENVE M-Series rims do away with the hooked bead design of their previous XC, AM and DH-branded rims. Ibis surprised many with the introduction of its ultra-wide carbon rims, which were co-developed with Derby, who introduced wide carbon rims without bead hooks in 2013.

ENVE's new m series rims feature a rim profile that does away with the traditional bead hook found on most mountain bike rims:

The new ENVE M Series rims cover everything from cross-country to downhill (left to right) and do away with the bead hook while adding a bead lock feature down the center of the rims

Specialized product manager Joe Buckley said the design team made the transition to hookless carbon rims as a way to improve impact resistance and cut manufacturing costs.

“In carbon rim production, there are a couple ways to make a bead hook. You can mold it into the rim, which is pretty challenging because you are trying to pack a lot of carbon material into a very small space.?This can lead to high reject rates at the factory and drive up cost of the rim.?Or you can mold the rim and then machine the bead hooks into the sidewall, which creates a nice bead hook, but adds steps to production, which costs more, and also when you machine the rim, the carbon fibers are being cut, which weakens the rim a bit. By creating rims without bead hooks, we were able to get the impact resistance of the rim to improve by a lot, and bring the cost of the rim down as well,” said Buckley.

Scott Nielson, director of R&D for ENVE Composites, notes that performance gains were also part of the transition to a hookless design.

“Through our development program we discovered that by removing the hook we could produce a rim and tire combination that performed better that rims with hook beads. We feel that the hookless system gives us a performance advantage. The tire shape that results is more stable and gives the rider a wheel that corners better and will not burp,” said Nielson.

Of burps and blow-offs

The primary concerns these companies hear about the transition to hookless rim profiles are? fears of tires blowing off or of an increased likelihood of burping air from tubeless tires.

In both cases, the bead lock (the small ridges on either side of the drop channel) is the primary component in retaining the tire and preventing blowoffs.

These cutaways of derby rims show the central drop channel, used to aid in mounting tires, and the raised bead locks on either side of this central channel that prevent the tire from unseating or burping air:

These cutaways of Derby rims show the drop channel, used to aid in mounting tires, and the raised bead locks on either side of this central channel that prevent the tire from unseating and burping air

EVNE states that the company has been prototyping M-series rims for a year and found greater burp resistance through laboratory loading and months of field-testing with a variety of tires.

Roval introduced hookless versions of its carbon roval wheelsets last year:

Roval rims have been on the market for more than a year and customers appear pleased with the design

“When we introduced our first hookless rim a couple years ago, we did a lot of blow-off testing with our tires as well as our competitors’.?We were pretty confident that tires coming off were not going to be an issue.?We also logged a lot of ride hours on them.?We never had a problem with tire retention in development, and in the couple years they’ve been on customers’ bikes, tires have been staying on just fine, no matter tubed or tubeless.?To sum up, existing standards that companies are using today have been fine,” said Buckley.

The way forward?

So if the benefits are lower manufacturing costs, improved durability and better trail performance, will hookless rims become the norm for all mountain bike rims in the future? Buckley thinks it is possible.

“If you’d asked me that a few months ago, I would have probably answered with ‘maybe.’? With the product releases from our competitors in the past week or so though, it’s looking like what the Roval team discovered might be quickly becoming the norm for carbon,” Buckley said. “As for alloy, that remains to be seen. The manufacturing method is very different, as well as the material, so it’s a bit of a different animal.? There is definitely something to it, though.”


Volagi Liscio2 review

The Volagi Liscio was the market’s first disc brake specific performance road bike. BikeRadar tested the original Liscio back in 2011 and enjoyed the ride, but most importantly, the braking performance. Now we’re in 2014, there’s far more support for road discs, with hydraulic brakes and compatible lightweight wheels easily sourced.

In many ways, the Liscio2 (confusingly still called the ‘Liscio’) is the same as the original, but there are a few important improvements. The frame has moved to internal cable routing, which makes it compatible with both electronic and mechanical systems. Additionally, the rear dropouts have been widened to 135mm, a now-accepted width for disc brake equipped road bikes.

Our test bike blended functional performance and value for money. Two key highlights are the TRP HY/RD brakes and Volagi’s Ignite SL carbon clincher wheelset, which was mated to a modest Shimano Ultegra 6800 build.

Ride and handling: competitive handling with relaxed positioning

The Liscio is now faster, and this is purely due to the lighter (and more expensive) rotating mass of our build. Jumping on the pedals is met with a satisfying turn of speed, still not in the same league as a race bike, but an improvement that easily excites.

As we’d mentioned in our previous review, the Liscio loves high-speed descending and offers an incredibly stable ride. When we overshot a corner at speed, we could comfortably fix it with the easily controlled brakes, helped by the stable handling. Leaning into corners is not race-bike quick but is livelier than expected given the bike’s relaxed head angle.

Volagi’s own LongBow Flex stays see the seatstays swoop past the seat tube and connect to the top tube. The idea behind this is to remove much of the impact force coming from the rear wheel and divert it into the frame, away from the rider. While it’s aesthetically pleasing, it doesn’t really make a noticeable difference to ride quality.

The ride isn’t harsh by any means, but small bump compliance is lacking, with the 25c high volume rubber doing the hard work to smooth the roads surface. This isn’t a bad thing, as we were expecting a disconnected sofa-like quality and in turn got a ride that took the edge off rough roads, without eliminating the feel of what the bike was doing beneath the rider.

Where the LongBow seatstay design shows itself is on larger impacts, such as potholes or imperfections in the road surface. The design definitely lessens the impact to the body on these sudden and often harsh impacts. We wouldn’t go as far to call it suspension, but it takes the sting away.

Stiffness at the front end is adequate, however the separated seat tube section is easily flexed – luckily this has little noticeable effect under power. The slender aero profile tubes are pleasing to look at but are also the reason for the ride quality and detectable flex.

At the rear of the frame it’s a different story, with tall chainstays and a large BB30 bottom bracket section providing plenty of drivetrain stiffness to give efficient forward drive.

Positioning on the bike is comfortable, with a tall head tube that lets you achieve an upright position. The frame’s sloping top tube design means much of the proprietary aero shaped seatpost is exposed, with a generous adjustment range among the six sizes on offer. ???

Frame and equipment: minor yet important improvements

In 2011, the Liscio was revolutionary. Since then the frame hasn’t received any major changes. The carbon layup and tube profiles remain the same, as does the geometry.

The new electronic compatible internal gear cable routing is clean and simple and comes at a perfect time to match Shimano’s new R785 Di2 Hydraulic offering. The gear cables now enter at the front of the head tube, allowing for cleaner lines and shorter housing. The internally guided brake routing in the fork and frame pose a nuisance for those using new full-hydraulic setups, meaning a forced rebleed on initial build and in case of future rebuilds.

Rear dropout spacing was a previous complaint of ours and Volagi has now moved to the industry accepted 135mm width. This greatly expands your wheel options, as road disc specific wheels and even 29er mountain bike wheels will now fit.

Our test sample was fitted with Shimano’s new semi-compact cranks, we felt the 52/36T gearing was perfectly suited mpleted the bike’s versatility. It’s ready for long mountain ascents with ripping speeds on the return.

The 25c Michelin tyres ballooned with the Volagi 25.55mm width rim Ignite SL wheels, providing the small bump compliance. At just over 1,400g, the carbon clinchers are a competitive option in a growing road disc market – the wheels alone cost US/AU$1,895. Wheel stiffness was fair, but we did experience occasional and minor disc rotor rubbing with hard out of the saddle efforts, which shows there is some flex at the hub shell/axle/dropout interface. Luckily rubbing of this kind is barely enough to have any effect on efficiency.

Reefing on the TRP HY/RD brakes at speed rewarded us with control and confidence that’s hard to match with a full mechanical system. We experienced no sign of shudder, flex or pulsing that would signal the brake calliper and/or mounts are flexing under stress. At lower speeds, the brakes were grabby – something to be expected with the level of power on tap.

Much like our earlier review of the original Liscio, it’s hard to look past the disc brakes – they’re still what separates this bike from the masses and they remain confidence-inspiring, especially in poor conditions or high traffic. The biggest improvement to the Liscio is not through frame improvements, but rather in the increased brake and wheels options. ?

After three years on the market, the Liscio continues to offer an admirable combination of aesthetics, performance and confidence. The non-racer boldness of this bike was early for its time and has never been more relevant than now.

Note: Depending on your location, the Liscio may not be available as a complete bike. The frameset as tested includes the fork, seatpost and headset.

Build as tested:

  • Brakes: TRP HY/RD setup with Ashima compression-less housing
  • Handlebar: PRO PLT 42cm
  • Stem: PRO PLT 100mm
  • Groupset: Shimano Ultegra 6800 11sp
  • Tyres: Michelin Pro4 Service Course
  • Wheels: Volagi Ignite SL
  • Build price: AU$5,995
  • Weight: 7.73kg (without pedals)


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By admin on January 6, 2014 | Mountain Bikes
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