german

Eurobike creates a platform and code of conduct for bike bloggers

The trade show is seeking to increase trust and communication between the industry and bloggers. FRIEDRICHSHAFEN, Germany (BRAIN) — The owners of the Eurobike trade show are forming a platform, or club, of bike bloggers. The Wrider’s Club is intended to provide a central home for bike blogs and to increase the communication and trust between bloggers and the industry.

Felt president: Rossignol and Felt are ‘a perfect match’

IRVINE, Calif. (BRAIN) — The coupling of a 110-year-old French winter sports brand and a teen-aged American bicycle company was a perfect match, said Bill Duehring, president of Felt Bicycle. Duehring and partners Jim Felt and Michael Müllmann announced Friday that they had agreed to sell Felt Bicycle to Rossignol Group for an undisclosed amount

Canyon postpones US market launch to third quarter

SAUSALITO, Calif.

E-bike racing comes to the Mini Enduro series

If you’ve ever fancied putting an e-mountain bike through its paces in a racing context, now you can. The popular Mini Enduro series in the UK is offering an e-bike race category for 2017, including a special stage specifically designed for eMTBs. 

  • Best electric bike: how to choose the right one for you
  • Can an e-mtb make a mountain out of a molehill? 
  • E-bike power: throttle vs pedal assist

It’s perhaps not a surprise to find that the Mini Enduro series welcomes an e-mountain bike category, since one of its new title sponsors is Haibike, the German e-bike brand. Haibike, whose e-bike range covers everything from downhill mountain bike rigs to electric road bikes, feels the Mini Enduro Series’ ethos of inclusivity and accessibility fits well with the Haibike brand. 

In a comment to Dirt Magazine, UK Haibike representative Richard Downey said that the company was “super happy to be supporting the Mini Enduro and Welsh Gravity Enduro for 2017. Having been huge fans of the races these guys have put on for many years, it’s great to be involved with a bunch of people that reflect the true spirit of riding bikes in the woods with your mates. Chris and Charlie’s events are all about one thing: FUN.”

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Downey also commented to BikeRadar that both the Mini Enduro series and its sibling, the Mini DH series, has always been popular with Haibike staff. “The events have always been seen as low pressure, fun races. When they mentioned they’d added an e-bike class last year I jumped at the chance to have a blast around the Forest of Dean – and it was great! Everybody supports everybody.”

“It struck me straight away,” he continues. “We’ve known for some time that the vast majority of e-bikers are cyclists returning to the sport after a lengthy time away from the saddle, and this is a fantastic way of creating community, not only amongst e-bikers but the regular mountain bikers too.”

Mini Enduro race format

  • 10 reasons you really should try an e-MTB

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Canyon Stitched 720° first ride review

We tested Canyon’s Stitched 360° hardtail a couple of years back and loved it, so we were itching to get our hands on this full-suspension version when the German brand sneaked it out under their freeride team last year. We knew the Canyon Stitched 720° could kill it on a slopestyle course but would it be equally at home flowing through small trails and pump tracks or finding hucks out and about in town?

  • Best bike: our buyer’s guide to which bicycle type you should buy
  • How to jump a mountain bike

Canyon Stitched 720° spec overview

  • Rear Shock: RockShox Monarch RT
  • Fork: RockShox Pike DJ
  • Headset: Cane Creek 40
  • Brakes: Avid Elixir DB 3
  • Hubs: Stitched 360°
  • Cassette: 11t
  • Rims: Alex FR 30
  • Tyres: Maxxis IKON eXCeption + Exo 3C MaxxSpeed
  • Cranks: Truvativ Descendant
  • Chainrings: 32t
  • Chain: KMC Z510HX
  • Bottom Bracket: SRAM GXP
  • Stem: Canyon V16

Canyon Stitched 720° frame and equipment

The stiff aluminium frame delivers 100mm of rear wheel travel via a RockShox Monarch RT shock. There’s a tapered head tube up front and integrated chain tugs out back to keep the wheel in place in the horizontal dropouts and the chain tight. Ours did unwind themselves occasionally, so make sure you check regularly.

While the geometry charts may suggest a different ride to the hardtail version, most of the changes are to accommodate the rear shock and make very little difference to the handling. Because the main pivot is concentric with the bottom bracket (BB), the chainstays are only 5mm longer than on the Stitched 360°.

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Canyon’s own Stitched 360° parts make up most of the hardware and are all well matched to the frame. The 31.8mm diameter, 760mm wide bar has a nice sweep and rise, and there’s plenty of space for the super-wide, mushroom-style grips, though we’d have preferred lock-on rather than slide-on versions.

Canyon Stitched 720° ride impression

Slopestyle bikes, like their hardtail cousins, dirt jump bikes, just unlock the big kid in us all, filling our heads with thoughts of backflipping, 360ing and tailwhipping through our local jumps — until we remember that, actually, we’ll be lucky to make it through without crashing.

Canyon Stitched 720° early verdict

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Canyon Stitched 720° first ride review

We tested Canyon’s Stitched 360° hardtail a couple of years back and loved it, so we were itching to get our hands on this full-suspension version when the German brand sneaked it out under their freeride team last year. We knew the Canyon Stitched 720° could kill it on a slopestyle course but would it be equally at home flowing through small trails and pump tracks or finding hucks out and about in town?

  • Best bike: our buyer’s guide to which bicycle type you should buy
  • How to jump a mountain bike

Canyon Stitched 720° spec overview

  • Rear Shock: RockShox Monarch RT
  • Fork: RockShox Pike DJ
  • Headset: Cane Creek 40
  • Brakes: Avid Elixir DB 3
  • Hubs: Stitched 360°
  • Cassette: 11t
  • Rims: Alex FR 30
  • Tyres: Maxxis IKON eXCeption + Exo 3C MaxxSpeed
  • Cranks: Truvativ Descendant
  • Chainrings: 32t
  • Chain: KMC Z510HX
  • Bottom Bracket: SRAM GXP
  • Stem: Canyon V16

Canyon Stitched 720° frame and equipment

The stiff aluminium frame delivers 100mm of rear wheel travel via a RockShox Monarch RT shock. There’s a tapered head tube up front and integrated chain tugs out back to keep the wheel in place in the horizontal dropouts and the chain tight. Ours did unwind themselves occasionally, so make sure you check regularly.

While the geometry charts may suggest a different ride to the hardtail version, most of the changes are to accommodate the rear shock and make very little difference to the handling. Because the main pivot is concentric with the bottom bracket (BB), the chainstays are only 5mm longer than on the Stitched 360°.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Canyon’s own Stitched 360° parts make up most of the hardware and are all well matched to the frame. The 31.8mm diameter, 760mm wide bar has a nice sweep and rise, and there’s plenty of space for the super-wide, mushroom-style grips, though we’d have preferred lock-on rather than slide-on versions.

Canyon Stitched 720° ride impression

Slopestyle bikes, like their hardtail cousins, dirt jump bikes, just unlock the big kid in us all, filling our heads with thoughts of backflipping, 360ing and tailwhipping through our local jumps — until we remember that, actually, we’ll be lucky to make it through without crashing.

Canyon Stitched 720° early verdict

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

YT Jeffsy CF Pro first ride review

A 29in wheel trail bike might not have been quite what everyone was expecting from the German company YT, a brand well renowned for its big-hitting, long-travel bikes. Will its first foray into the world of big wheelers create the same buzz as its now legendary Capra though?

  • Best mountain bike: how to choose the right one for you
  • 5 reasons why YT’s Jeffsy is the coolest 29er to own in 2016

YT Jeffsy CF Pro spec overview

  • Frame: Jeffsy carbon 29″
  • Shock: Fox Float DPS Factory
  • Fork: Fox 34 Float
  • Rear derailleur: SRAM X01
  • Shifter: SRAMX01
  • Cassette: SRAM XG 1175
  • Chain: SRAM PCX1
  • Brakes: SRAM Guide Ultimate
  • Wheelset: DT Swiss XMC1200 Spline
  • Front and rear tyre: Onza Ibex
  • Stem: Renthal Apex
  • Handlebar: Renthal Fatbar carbon black
  • Saddle: SDG Circuit

YT Jeffsy CF Pro frame and equipment

YT wanted to ensure the Jeffsy fitted in with the rest of the bikes in its line-up, so designed it around a short stem and riser bar. The stumpy head tube also allows for the stem to be lifted/lowered on the steerer tube to help riders get bar height just where they want it.

The V4L suspension system pumps out 140mm of rear wheel travel, all of which is tamed using Fox’s Float DPS EVOL shock in a bid to deliver a supportive stroke that can be used to push hard and ride fast. There are two geometry settings that are easy enough to switch between thanks to the flip chip located in the rearmost shock mount, letting you slacken the head angle out from 68.9 to 67.6 degrees, which in turn drops the bottom bracket by 8mm.

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Chainstay length is dependent upon which size frame you go for, with the small and medium sporting a 435mm chainstay while the large and extra-large use a lengthier 440mm offering in a bid to balance handling.

Other points to note include the Boost 12×148mm rear axle spacing, plenty of integrated chainstay protection, room for a water bottle (albeit the custom YT cage only) and, for the most part at least, external cable routing. Interestingly, although the back-end gets the Boost treatment, YT is using non-Boost (meaning the front wheel isn’t as stiff as it could be) 140mm Fox 34 forks and with the shorter offset up front.

YT Jeffsy CF Pro ride impression

YT Jeffsy CF Pro early verdict

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Hygge and the Firepit of Transport

Advent Candles Week Three

The concept of “hygge” is, by all accounts, all the rage this year. A slough of books about “how to hygge” are on the market in the UK alone this year. The Guardian even endevoured to produce a good longread about the whole shebang.?All to the amusement of Danes for whom the word is more of a ingrained feeling than a concept requiring an instruction manual.

Hyg. Hygge. Hyggelig. ?This simple Danish word has captured many imaginations. Other languages have a similar word – gemütlichkeit in German or gezellig in Dutch but in Danish the meaning is taken to the next level. It often gets translated as “cosy”, but that is sadly inadequate. I’m going to get to how or if hygge relates to transport, but I need to lay down a baseline first.

My standing example when I have to explain the concept to foreigners took place when I was in my 20s. A group of male friends and I met at a friend’s flat on a dark, November evening with pizza and beer to watch a Champion’s League match. Cue the usual boy banter and piss-taking. Until one of the guys looked around and said, “Lars… don’t you have any candles?” Lars had forgotten. He promptly hopped up to get them and light five or six of them, adding a “sorry” as he sat back down. A calm settled over the group and the football evening continued.

In the winter months, candles are the prerequisite hygge prop. Indeed, Danes burn more candles than anyone else in the world. The focus on hygge in the international press – ?and a slough of glossy womens’ magazines – however, seems to be focused on baking cookies and moping under a duvet on the sofa whilst wearing slippers/wooly socks and sweatpants like a rejected character in Sex and the City. If that is the image we’re going to get slapped with in Denmark, we need to do some serious brand damage control.

I’ve been asking other Danes for a couple of decades how they define hygge and I went on an asking spree before writing this article. While the general concept of hygge is etched delicately into the nucleus of our every cell, there is a slight divide in the interpretation, which may be a recent development. The debate is about whether you can hyg by yourself or whether you need to be at least two people.

If you ask the older generation, most are adamant that it takes at least two to hygge tango. Many members of the younger generation, on the other hand, are fine with the idea of being able to hyg alone. If you told me that you were home alone last night and enjoyed a good book on the sofa with a cup of tea, I won’t ask if it was hyggeligt, although you might offer the comment that you hyggede with yourself. Yes. It’s a bit confusing. Personally, I find it most hyggelig when I spend time with one or more friends. At the end of it all, you can declare to each other “good to see you! It was hyggelig!” Home alone on the sofa, there is no one to say that to.

Four Candles, A Zebra Crossing and a Bike

Right then. How does this apply to transport? Copenhageners, rumour has it, are predisposed to transport themselves in great numbers by bicycle each day. 56% of the citizens of the Danish capital, at last count. Urban cycling is certainly the most anthropologically-correct transport form for city dwellers. It provides independent mobility but still allows for interaction – conscious or sub-conscious – with the urban landscape and, not least, the other homo sapiens that inhabit it with you.

To be honest, I’ve never heard anyone say that it was hyggelig to ride a bike to work. That might just be because we don’t often associate such things with transport. Avid cyclists will preach that cycling is “fun” as their primary messaging aimed at encouraging others to join their tribe. While I might, if forced, admit that cycling each and every day in Copenhagen is enjoyable, I would never use “fun”. Indeed, I’ve declared here on this blog that “cycling isn’t fun, it’s transport”.

Let’s slip under the surface for a moment. I dare to assume that the sub-conscious interaction with one’s city is one of the key strengths to growing and/or maintaining cycling levels. I’ve been asked in all seriousness several times through the years if cyclists wave at each other in Copenhagen – like I suppose they do in other parts of world where they are a rarity on the streets. However cute that might be, what a monumental task – waving at thousands of people all day long. And none waving back. But the subliminal sense of togetherness – something few realise – is there. The simple urban anthropological contentment at sharing a city with other humans – in a human form on a bicycle as opposed to boxed in and invisible in a car – is everpresent.

To be honest, in the hundreds and hundreds of interviews I’ve done about cycling in Copenhagen, no journalist has ever asked if there was an element of hygge to it. Until last week… thanks to the current hyggepocalypse that is raging. Many, many journalists, however, have asked about the correlation between being consistently ranked as the world’s “happiest” nation and our cycling habits.

First of all, on THAT note, the actual question asked in the survey is “are you content with your life?” Not quite the same as “are you happy”, is it? It gets morphed into headline friendly “happy” after the fact. Look at the Top 10 happiest nations for 2016. Seven of them – including all the Nordics – are countries with a high standard of living, cradle to grave health care, six weeks of annual holiday and strong secular cultures. Cycling doesn’t have much to do with it.

Hygge is not exclusive to the Danes, however. It is merely an extension of the firepit. Besides serving an important role for security, warmth and preparation of food, the firepit was the adhesive that brought a tribe together. After a long day of hunting and gathering or warfaring, it was around the firepit that the tribe would gather. To eat, talk, tell stories. I suppose the television has replaced the firepit in many ways. Nevertheless, Danes just keep on firepitting in their own way. Seeking out the simplicity of togetherness.

Langebro Conversation
“Conversation cycling”

So cycling in itself may not be regarded as hyggeligt, but there are still ample opportunities to enjoy the company of a friend as you cycle, with Best Practice infrastructure and what we call “conversation lanes” in Copenhagen. Whatever the season.

Cargo Bike Evening
There can certainly be bicycle-related hygge, but the bicycle is merely a prop that makes it possible. Like chatting outside a bar in a cargo bike.

Morten, the Bicycle Chef, working his magic in #Copenhagen #cphize16 @cykelkokken
Cykelkokken at work.

Copenhagen’s renowed Bicycle Chef – Cykelkokken – Morten serves up gourmet food from his cargo bike and my god it’s hyggelig. Holding hands with someone you love while cycling is also hyggelig, but again… the bike is a mere prop.

Summertime in #copenhagen . Portable bbq
Bring your own bbq.

I would argue that on some level, cycling is the firepit of transport. People gather at red lights. Not eating, talking or telling stories with each other, but they are elbow to elbow with other members of the urban tribe.

A long series of firepit moments in the morning rush hour.

Warming themselves with the tightly-woven urban fabric on a deep but important sub-conscious level.

Copenhagenize the planet. And have a lovely day.

By admin on November 27, 2016 | Bike News, Fashion, Health, Nuts
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Haibike becomes first e-bike sponsor of Sea Otter Classic

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. (BRAIN) —   Haibike  has signed a multi-year sponsorship agreement to be the first official e-bike sponsor of the Sea Otter Classic

CABDA show preps for third run in St. Charles

ST. CHARLES, Ill. (BRAIN) — The Chicagoland Area Bicycle Dealers Association show is growing in size to fit companies interested in exhibiting at the February show, which is set to return to the Pheasant Run Resort in St