german

21 brands confirmed for Bike PressCamp

Still room for more exhibitors, organizer ECRM says; Canyon Bicycles signs on. SOLON, Ohio (BRAIN) — Bike PressCamp organizer ECRM said Thursday that it saw a surge in exhibitor signups last month coming out of the Sea Otter Classic, and now has 21 brands set to attend the June 19-23 event. The new signups include Canyon Bicycles, the German consumer-direct brand set to enter the U.S.

It’s electrifying! E-bikes become a staple at Sea Otter

Editor’s note: This article appears in the festival guide for this year’s Sea Otter Classic, which starts Thursday and runs through Sunday. Visit bicycleretailer.com later this week for on-site coverage from Sea Otter. Electric bikes can let you rip on off-road trails — uphill.

Industry veteran Blair Clark to lead Canyon US; German brand sets up California office

Canyon staffs up as it preps for U.S. entry KOBLENZ, Germany (BRAIN) — Canyon Bicycles GmbH has made several key hires in the U.S. as it prepares to begin selling direct to consumers in late summer

E-bikes power Accell Group past 1B euro mark; while bankruptcies short circuit North America sales

HEERENVEEN, Netherlands (BRAIN) — On the strength of e-bike sales in Europe — especially in Germany — Accell Group’s sales last year were up 6 percent, breaking the one billion-euro barrier for the first time in company history.

Eurobike creates a platform and code of conduct for bike bloggers

The trade show is seeking to increase trust and communication between the industry and bloggers. FRIEDRICHSHAFEN, Germany (BRAIN) — The owners of the Eurobike trade show are forming a platform, or club, of bike bloggers. The Wrider’s Club is intended to provide a central home for bike blogs and to increase the communication and trust between bloggers and the industry.

Felt president: Rossignol and Felt are ‘a perfect match’

IRVINE, Calif. (BRAIN) — The coupling of a 110-year-old French winter sports brand and a teen-aged American bicycle company was a perfect match, said Bill Duehring, president of Felt Bicycle. Duehring and partners Jim Felt and Michael Müllmann announced Friday that they had agreed to sell Felt Bicycle to Rossignol Group for an undisclosed amount

Canyon postpones US market launch to third quarter

SAUSALITO, Calif.

E-bike racing comes to the Mini Enduro series

If you’ve ever fancied putting an e-mountain bike through its paces in a racing context, now you can. The popular Mini Enduro series in the UK is offering an e-bike race category for 2017, including a special stage specifically designed for eMTBs. 

  • Best electric bike: how to choose the right one for you
  • Can an e-mtb make a mountain out of a molehill? 
  • E-bike power: throttle vs pedal assist

It’s perhaps not a surprise to find that the Mini Enduro series welcomes an e-mountain bike category, since one of its new title sponsors is Haibike, the German e-bike brand. Haibike, whose e-bike range covers everything from downhill mountain bike rigs to electric road bikes, feels the Mini Enduro Series’ ethos of inclusivity and accessibility fits well with the Haibike brand. 

In a comment to Dirt Magazine, UK Haibike representative Richard Downey said that the company was “super happy to be supporting the Mini Enduro and Welsh Gravity Enduro for 2017. Having been huge fans of the races these guys have put on for many years, it’s great to be involved with a bunch of people that reflect the true spirit of riding bikes in the woods with your mates. Chris and Charlie’s events are all about one thing: FUN.”

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Downey also commented to BikeRadar that both the Mini Enduro series and its sibling, the Mini DH series, has always been popular with Haibike staff. “The events have always been seen as low pressure, fun races. When they mentioned they’d added an e-bike class last year I jumped at the chance to have a blast around the Forest of Dean – and it was great! Everybody supports everybody.”

“It struck me straight away,” he continues. “We’ve known for some time that the vast majority of e-bikers are cyclists returning to the sport after a lengthy time away from the saddle, and this is a fantastic way of creating community, not only amongst e-bikers but the regular mountain bikers too.”

Mini Enduro race format

  • 10 reasons you really should try an e-MTB

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Canyon Stitched 720° first ride review

We tested Canyon’s Stitched 360° hardtail a couple of years back and loved it, so we were itching to get our hands on this full-suspension version when the German brand sneaked it out under their freeride team last year. We knew the Canyon Stitched 720° could kill it on a slopestyle course but would it be equally at home flowing through small trails and pump tracks or finding hucks out and about in town?

  • Best bike: our buyer’s guide to which bicycle type you should buy
  • How to jump a mountain bike

Canyon Stitched 720° spec overview

  • Rear Shock: RockShox Monarch RT
  • Fork: RockShox Pike DJ
  • Headset: Cane Creek 40
  • Brakes: Avid Elixir DB 3
  • Hubs: Stitched 360°
  • Cassette: 11t
  • Rims: Alex FR 30
  • Tyres: Maxxis IKON eXCeption + Exo 3C MaxxSpeed
  • Cranks: Truvativ Descendant
  • Chainrings: 32t
  • Chain: KMC Z510HX
  • Bottom Bracket: SRAM GXP
  • Stem: Canyon V16

Canyon Stitched 720° frame and equipment

The stiff aluminium frame delivers 100mm of rear wheel travel via a RockShox Monarch RT shock. There’s a tapered head tube up front and integrated chain tugs out back to keep the wheel in place in the horizontal dropouts and the chain tight. Ours did unwind themselves occasionally, so make sure you check regularly.

While the geometry charts may suggest a different ride to the hardtail version, most of the changes are to accommodate the rear shock and make very little difference to the handling. Because the main pivot is concentric with the bottom bracket (BB), the chainstays are only 5mm longer than on the Stitched 360°.

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Canyon’s own Stitched 360° parts make up most of the hardware and are all well matched to the frame. The 31.8mm diameter, 760mm wide bar has a nice sweep and rise, and there’s plenty of space for the super-wide, mushroom-style grips, though we’d have preferred lock-on rather than slide-on versions.

Canyon Stitched 720° ride impression

Slopestyle bikes, like their hardtail cousins, dirt jump bikes, just unlock the big kid in us all, filling our heads with thoughts of backflipping, 360ing and tailwhipping through our local jumps — until we remember that, actually, we’ll be lucky to make it through without crashing.

Canyon Stitched 720° early verdict

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Canyon Stitched 720° first ride review

We tested Canyon’s Stitched 360° hardtail a couple of years back and loved it, so we were itching to get our hands on this full-suspension version when the German brand sneaked it out under their freeride team last year. We knew the Canyon Stitched 720° could kill it on a slopestyle course but would it be equally at home flowing through small trails and pump tracks or finding hucks out and about in town?

  • Best bike: our buyer’s guide to which bicycle type you should buy
  • How to jump a mountain bike

Canyon Stitched 720° spec overview

  • Rear Shock: RockShox Monarch RT
  • Fork: RockShox Pike DJ
  • Headset: Cane Creek 40
  • Brakes: Avid Elixir DB 3
  • Hubs: Stitched 360°
  • Cassette: 11t
  • Rims: Alex FR 30
  • Tyres: Maxxis IKON eXCeption + Exo 3C MaxxSpeed
  • Cranks: Truvativ Descendant
  • Chainrings: 32t
  • Chain: KMC Z510HX
  • Bottom Bracket: SRAM GXP
  • Stem: Canyon V16

Canyon Stitched 720° frame and equipment

The stiff aluminium frame delivers 100mm of rear wheel travel via a RockShox Monarch RT shock. There’s a tapered head tube up front and integrated chain tugs out back to keep the wheel in place in the horizontal dropouts and the chain tight. Ours did unwind themselves occasionally, so make sure you check regularly.

While the geometry charts may suggest a different ride to the hardtail version, most of the changes are to accommodate the rear shock and make very little difference to the handling. Because the main pivot is concentric with the bottom bracket (BB), the chainstays are only 5mm longer than on the Stitched 360°.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Canyon’s own Stitched 360° parts make up most of the hardware and are all well matched to the frame. The 31.8mm diameter, 760mm wide bar has a nice sweep and rise, and there’s plenty of space for the super-wide, mushroom-style grips, though we’d have preferred lock-on rather than slide-on versions.

Canyon Stitched 720° ride impression

Slopestyle bikes, like their hardtail cousins, dirt jump bikes, just unlock the big kid in us all, filling our heads with thoughts of backflipping, 360ing and tailwhipping through our local jumps — until we remember that, actually, we’ll be lucky to make it through without crashing.

Canyon Stitched 720° early verdict

You can read more at BikeRadar.com