edge

In rain and sun, the BRAIN Dealer Tour comes to Colorado’s Grand Valley

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (BRAIN) — The BRAIN Dealer Tour is visting stores and suppliers here this week, pedaling between stops in glorious sun and cold rain. So far

In rain and sun, the BRAIN Dealer Tour comes to Colorado’s Grand Valley

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (BRAIN) — The BRAIN Dealer Tour is visting stores and suppliers here this week, pedaling between stops in glorious sun and cold rain

How to air drop offs

You’re pelting along your favourite trail at full speed, only you know that around that corner is the steep drop-off that’ll brain you unless you slow down. Wouldn’t it be great if you could keep going?

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While you may not choose to launch from drop-offs all the time, learning how to do so is a very good idea because there will be occasions when you’re faced with one and won’t have time to slow down. You’ll also be able to leave your mates for dead…

More often than not, there will be something you can use to land on that’s sloping away from you; this will help reduce the impact to both you and your bike. Wherever possible, scope out a suitable landing spot that resembles a landing ramp. Even the smallest of transitions, like a rock or bank, can be used.

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Beginners should look for something to roll off at first, but as you get better you should try bigger drop-offs that can only be dropped.

Step-by-step guide to airing drop offs

1. Approach

This is the edge of the drop. If it makes it easier for you, make a mark on the ground where you’d ideally want to take off, then try to aim for this on your approach to the edge. Have your preferred foot forward and be ready to shift your body weight back as you pull up.

2. Take-off

3. Levelling out

4. Spot the landing

5. Landing gear down

Drop-off basics and top tips for mastering them

1. Tech and prep 

2. Where to learn

3. Back to basics

4. ‘Place’ the rear wheel

5. It’s all in the mind

6. Progressing your skills

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Jenny Rissveds’ winning mental and physical training strategies

Winning an Olympic Gold Medal in cross-country mountain biking takes dedication, training and preparation. BikeRadar caught up with Scott-Odlo rider Jenny Rissveds, who added a Gold at Rio to her Under 23 World Champion title this year, to discover some of the mental and physical training techniques and strategies she uses to perform to the highest level. 

  • Best women’s mountain bike: a buyer’s guide to help you choose the right bike for you
  • Six of the best women’s mountain bike saddles
  • 9 steps to your own life-changing adventure

It goes without saying that as an athlete at the top of her game, Rissveds spends a lot of time preparing physically for the rigours of cross country racing. Speaking to the Olympic champion, who has a calm demeanour and a practical, measured approach to racing, it’s also clear that mental preparation is a very important part of her training, and one that she credits no small part of her success to.

Mental preparation

1. Bring in expert help

“As a top athlete, you want to overcome everything on your own. You don’t need any help from anybody else. I think that’s what makes you better, but sometimes you have to accept that you can’t manage everything by yourself.” Rissveds tells BikeRadar, and her views on this are borne out of a shocking incident in her riding history.

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I had a really bad crash on some steep switchbacks. I slipped out and fell over the edge, and was stuck in a tree on the other side. If that tree hadn’t been there, I’d have been finished

“I used to do road races as well, and I was at the Junior European champs in Italy when I had a really bad crash on some steep switchbacks. I slipped out and fell over the edge, and was stuck in a tree on the other side. If that tree hand’t been there, I’d have been finished.

“After that I struggled a lot. I was so scared on the bike. I didn’t want to ride any more; it was a tough time. So I started working with a mental coach. In the beginning, I told him ‘I don’t need your help, I can do this on my own.’ But he sees stuff in a completely different way, from a different point of view. When I first started to understand this, and tried to think in the same way as he thinks, I started to see positive outcomes.”

It’s self-evident that this approach has worked for Rissveds. From a deep and understandable fear that began with a terrifying experience, she has worked with her coach to develop strategies and techniques that have not only overcome those concerns, but also helped her improve her performance. 

2. The power of visualisation

3. Focus on performance, not position

4. Make a plan, but be adaptable

Physical preparation

1. The importance of the off-season

2. Cross training is important, both for fitness and motivation

3. Adapt and evolve your training

4. Consider a training camp (but don’t forget to work beforehand)

  • How to get the most from your cycle training camp

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Jenny Rissveds’ winning mental and physical training strategies

Winning an Olympic Gold Medal in cross-country mountain biking takes dedication, training and preparation. BikeRadar caught up with Scott-Odlo rider Jenny Rissveds, who added a Gold at Rio to her Under 23 World Champion title this year, to discover some of the mental and physical training techniques and strategies she uses to perform to the highest level. 

  • Best women’s mountain bike: a buyer’s guide to help you choose the right bike for you
  • Six of the best women’s mountain bike saddles
  • 9 steps to your own life-changing adventure

It goes without saying that as an athlete at the top of her game, Rissveds spends a lot of time preparing physically for the rigours of cross country racing. Speaking to the Olympic champion, who has a calm demeanour and a practical, measured approach to racing, it’s also clear that mental preparation is a very important part of her training, and one that she credits no small part of her success to.

Mental preparation

1. Bring in expert help

“As a top athlete, you want to overcome everything on your own. You don’t need any help from anybody else. I think that’s what makes you better, but sometimes you have to accept that you can’t manage everything by yourself.” Rissveds tells BikeRadar, and her views on this are borne out of a shocking incident in her riding history.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

I had a really bad crash on some steep switchbacks. I slipped out and fell over the edge, and was stuck in a tree on the other side. If that tree hadn’t been there, I’d have been finished

“I used to do road races as well, and I was at the Junior European champs in Italy when I had a really bad crash on some steep switchbacks. I slipped out and fell over the edge, and was stuck in a tree on the other side. If that tree hand’t been there, I’d have been finished.

“After that I struggled a lot. I was so scared on the bike. I didn’t want to ride any more; it was a tough time. So I started working with a mental coach. In the beginning, I told him ‘I don’t need your help, I can do this on my own.’ But he sees stuff in a completely different way, from a different point of view. When I first started to understand this, and tried to think in the same way as he thinks, I started to see positive outcomes.”

It’s self-evident that this approach has worked for Rissveds. From a deep and understandable fear that began with a terrifying experience, she has worked with her coach to develop strategies and techniques that have not only overcome those concerns, but also helped her improve her performance. 

2. The power of visualisation

3. Focus on performance, not position

4. Make a plan, but be adaptable

Physical preparation

1. The importance of the off-season

2. Cross training is important, both for fitness and motivation

3. Adapt and evolve your training

4. Consider a training camp (but don’t forget to work beforehand)

  • How to get the most from your cycle training camp

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

How to drop into downslopes in 4 simple-to-learn steps

Dropping on to a downslope can be fairly intimidating, because you often can’t spot the landing until you’re in the air. Before attempting a drop to a downslope, we recommend that you’re comfortable hitting drops at slow speeds, and you’re also confident on steep gradients.

  • Best mountain bike: how to choose the right one for you
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In nearly every case it’s best to ‘squash’ the drop so you’re actually making it smaller and not travelling as far through the air and further away from the landing. The aim is to get your bodyweight dropping just as you go over the lip, so good timing is essential – too early and your front wheel will dive too late and you’ll launch rather than drop.

How to drop into downslopes

1. The approach

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Stand in your neutral position and stay loose and relaxed, because you’re going to need to be dynamic very soon! As you get closer, look for the landing but keep your head up.

2. Drop and push

As you approach the edge, drop your body and push the bike forwards with your arms. You need to time this so your bike is unweighted over the edge.

3. Extend your legs

4. Compress as you land

Points to remember

  • Get your speed right: Set your speed early so you have time to prepare yourself. Roll into the drop at a medium pace to start with – once you’re comfortable, you can hit it slower or faster.
  • Don’t lean back: Don’t confuse getting low with leaning back. Think about pushing the bike forwards and dropping your hips. This may look like you’re leaning back but you’re definitely not. The rear wheel should be unweighted as you go over the edge.
  • Be positive and focus: Concentrate on what you have to do. If you have any negative thoughts or doubts in your head, find a way to overcome them and focus on what you need to do before attempting the drop.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Rotor taps On the Edge for Canadian distribution

MADRID (BRAIN) — Rotor Bike Components has signed with Quebec City-based On the Edge for Canadian distribution, effective March 1. Rotor was previously distributed in the market by KHS Canada. “We are excited to add Rotor to our lineup of brands,” said Jean Philippe Da Silva, director of sales and marketing for On the Edge.

Garmin launches bike radar, smart bike lights and new GPS unit with live Strava display

OLATHE, Kan. (BRAIN) — Garmin in Wednesday launched a new product that uses radar to alert riders to approaching cars, plus head and tailights that react to rider speed and a new GPS-enabled head unit that will display Strava segments in real time.

Over the Edge Sports opens fourth location, this time in Tahoe

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. (BRAIN) — Retailer Over the Edge Sports will have a grand opening for its newest location, in South Lake Tahoe, Calif., on Friday, May 22. Over the Edge’s other locations are in mountain bike hotbeds of Fruita, Colo., Hurricane, Utah, and Melrose, Australia.

How to repair a puncture – video

Knowing how to repair a puncture is an essential skill that every cyclist needs to master. It can be daunting for the inexperienced but only takes a few minutes once you know what you’re doing.

In this video, BikeRadar’s James Tennant explains how to carry out the task in a step-by-step walkthough, which demonstrates the procedure on a mountain bike.

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Need to stock up on tools before you start? You can purchase Park Tools used in the video at a number of dealers across the UK and internationally.

Here’s written instructions for those who prefer them to visual demos.

1 Find the puncture

Starting at the valve, check all the way around the tyre’s tread to find the cause of the puncture. Remove any glass or grit that you spot. Even if you find one possible cause, continue checking the tyre until you get back to the valve.

1: 1

2 Remove the tube

Let the air out of the inner tube and push the valve up into the tyre – unscrewing and retaining the valve ring, if fitted. On the side of the wheel opposite the valve, slip a tyre lever under the tyre’s bead and a further tyre lever about 5cm away. Pull the nearer tyre lever (available from all good bike shops) towards you, lifting the tyre’s bead over the edge of the rim.

Continue until one bead of the tyre is completely free of the rim. Pull the tube out. Remove the tyre completely from the rim – with most tyres this can be done by hand unless exceptionally tight.

Note: it’s not always essential to remove the tube from the tyre, as the video above demonstrates.

2: 2

3 Inflate the punctured tube

Inflate the tube and listen for air escaping. Passing the surface of the tube over the lips is a favourite trick of mine. If the hole still can’t be found, re-inflate the tube and pass it through a bowl of water until you spot escaping bubbles. Then dry the tube before proceeding to the next step.

Take care – do not twist a push-fit pump on the valve. The pump should be pushed on straight and pulled off with a single straight pull. The stem nut can easily be broken off if the pump is twisted sideways.

3: 3

4 Prepare the tube

Select the correct size of patch – use a bigger rather than a smaller patch if in doubt. Roughen the surface of the tube around the hole with emery paper. Ensure that any moulding marks are flattened completely. Apply one drop of tyre cement and spread it thinly with your finger over a 2cm circle around the hole. Allow to dry. Apply a second thin layer similarly. Once again, allow to dry – the rubber cement will change from shiny to matt.

4a: 4a

4b: 4b

5 Patch the tube

Inflate the tube slightly – this will help to highlight the position of the hole. Firmly press the patch into place after removing the backing foil. If there’s a thin cellophane backing on the patch, it can be left on. Dust the repair with chalk, talcum powder or road dust to prevent it sticking to the tyre casing.

5a: 5a

5b: 5b

6 Check the casing

Before refitting the tube, double-check the tyre casing from inside for the cause of your puncture. On one occasion after riding a canal towpath with hedge clippings, I found over half a dozen thorns! Placing the tube over the tyre will help to you to discover the position of the puncture. Run your fingertips carefully around the inside of the tyre to feel for the cause of the puncture and remove.

6: 6

7 Refit the tyre

After repairing the tube and checking the tyre for glass, thorns or any other sharp debris, refit one bead to the rim. Slightly inflate the tube and refit it to the rim, putting the valve through its hole first. Starting at the opposite side of the rim to the valve, use your thumbs to lift the tyre’s bead (the part of the tyre that connects the rim to the wheel) over the rim. Work around the rim until there’s just one small section of tyre left. Push the valve up into the tyre and then, using your thumbs, ease the remaining section of the tyre’s bead over the edge of the rim.

7a: 7a

7b: 7b

8 Make final checks

Check that the tube isn’t trapped between the rim and the tyre bead. Inflate to the point where the tyre feels soft but has maintained its shape. Check that the moulding mark around the tyre follows the rim evenly all the way around. If not, deflate a little and ease any high spots down and pull low spots up until the bead is fitted evenly.

Inflate to the recommended pressure and check once again that the tyre’s bead is still seated evenly and that the tyre isn’t lifting off the rim at any point. Finally, check that the tread is running reasonably straight by spinning the wheel. If not, deflate the tyre and start again from the beginning of this step.

8: 8

Puncture fixing tips

  • When taking the tube out of the tyre, note which way the tube was around in the wheel. This will help identify the position of the hole in the tube once the position of the object in the tyre causing the puncture has been found.
  • With a ballpoint pen, mark the hole with a cross so you can pinpoint it accurately.
  • If you don’t have any emery paper, roughen the tube by rubbing it against a stone or the road surface.
  • For tyres that blow off easily: fit a thicker rim tape or a second rim tape – this prevents the tyre bead sinking into the rim well and blowing off the opposite side.
  • For tight tyres: fit a thinner rim tape if possible – this will make your tyres easier to fit and remove.
  • Be very particular with your technique. The last section of the tyre to be fitted to the rim should be at the valve. Make sure that the tyre’s bead is pushed as far as possible into the well of the rim. Some very tight-fitting tyres may need tyre levers to fit them. Using VAR 425 special tyre levers will help to prevent puncturing the innertube when refitting the tyre.

Puncture identification

Two small holes in a tube placed fairly close together indicate a pinch puncture. This is caused by the tube getting trapped between the tyre and the rim when riding over a sharp object. Tyres not inflated hard enough are a frequent cause of this. Check that the tyre’s sidewall isn’t cut. If it is, you may need to use an emergency repair – see the ‘Emergency tyre repairs’ section below.

A hole on the inner side of the tube indicates that the puncture was caused by a spoke head. Check around the inside of the rim to ensure that the rim tape properly covers the spoke holes and no spoke end protrudes above the inner surface of the rim. If this happens it’ll need filing down.

A less common cause of a puncture is a rough edge to the valve hole rim. The puncture will be at the base of the valve and will not be repairable.

Puncture inspection: puncture inspection

Puncture inspection: puncture inspection

Create your own puncture kit

  • Feather edge patches
  • Rubber solution
  • Pair of plastic tyre levers
  • Piece of fine emery paper
  • Small adjustable spanner, if using wheels with hex nuts
  • Allen key if using Allen-bolt-fitting wheels
  • Reliable pump
  • Keyring LED – useful if you’re riding in the dark with a dynamo
  • Always carry a spare tube too.

Pump aside, all this should pack in an underseat bag.

Puncture kit: puncture kit

Weekly check-up

Check your tyres for cuts in the tread, swelling in the sidewall, or serious wear. Tyres with cuts, swelling or casing visible through the tread must be replaced. Remove any grit or glass embedded in the tread. Check your tyre pressures with a proper gauge. Tyres inflated to the correct tyre pressure will have fewer punctures and a longer life. The recommended pressures are normally marked on the sidewall of the tyre.

Use your spare

Repairing a puncture is very difficult in the rain as the patch will not stick to the tube. Instead, fit the spare tube that you always carry! The spare tube is also essential if a tyre blows off a rim, or if the tube is cut by the valve hole.

Emergency tyre repairs

Double over a largish section of heavy duty polythene. Trim off a piece 10cm wider than the gash and 5cm wider than the tyre. Remove the tyre from the rim. Wrap the double layer of the patch around the inside of the tyre casing centred on the slit or cut. With the patch overlapping each side of the casing, refit the first tyre bead, trapping the emergency patch.

Fit a new tube if necessary and inflate it a tad. Refit the second tyre bead with the patched section last. Check that the patch is trapped at both sides. Reinflate the tyre and trim off any excess patch. The patch will be held in place miraculously by the tyre’s air pressure.