daily

Giant USA promotes several employees to new roles this month

NEWBURY PARK, Calif. (BRAIN) — Giant USA has promoted several of its employees to new roles, starting with John “JT” Thompson, who has been promoted to executive director. Thompson will still be in charge of Giant’s sales and retail services, and now adds Credit, Product, and Marketing

My Stolen Bullitt


Here we go again.

Out into the backyard this morning with The Lulu, heading for school and then off to work. Something was missing. It was big and red and quite gone. My Bullitt cargo bike was not where it should be. Locked with the mother of all chains in our bike shed. It was stolen.

The first thought was “Damn… my logistics this week are screwed.” Second thought… “I liked that bike”. You know you live in a mainstream bicycle culture when the thoughts occur in THAT order.

I walked around the backyard in vain hope. Then I noticed that another Bullitt wasn’t parked in its normal spot. It was gone, too. Double Bullitt thieving in the dark of the night. In a secure, locked backyard.

Fun having to explain to The Lulu, aged 7, about why people do such things. She’s no stranger to bike theft, but still, she was as upset as me, so we had to tackle the subject on the spot.


It’s just a bike, I know. But it’s a bike that we use alot. For transporting stuff like just two days ago at the recycling centre. For building snowmen. For just getting around town. For all our daily needs.


Someone is going to have to break the news to Tigger this evening. THAT ain’t gonna be pretty.

This has happened before. Hey, it’s a bicycle culture. Back in 2011: My Bike Was Stolen! Back then the story had a fairytale ending against all the odds and thanks to social media: My Bullitt is Found!

I even got my vintage Swedish bike back once, too.

While I don’t harbour hopes of repeating those fairytales, you never know. There are loads and loads of Bullitts in Copenhagen now, compared to back in 2011 but anything could happen.

My bike has some unique markings. Sure, the first thing the bike thief does is remove them, but sometimes they just stick it in another backyard in another part of town for a while. There’s a pattern to this cargo bike theft.

So, here are the things that make it recognizable:


- A little sticker on the front.
- A Copenhagenize.eu sticker on the front panel.
- A map of Copenhagen on the cargo bay.


- The handlebars are unlike many Bullitts in Copenhagen. My mother taught me to sit up straight, so they are not low and straight, but high and suitable for a gentleman.
- There is a GoPro base on the front of the bike and, down by the front wheel on the left, there is another GoPro solution. (not pictured)
- On the back fender there are white, reflective chevron stickers, just like on The Lulu’s bike.

Sigh.

Hvis du ser cyklen et eller andet sted i København, sms eller ring på 26 25 97 26.

Copenhagenize the planet. And have a lovely day.

Industry veteran Beverly Barr retires – again

PHOENIX, Ariz. (BRAIN) — Industry veteran and life-long cyclist Beverly Barr has recently retired after helping to shepherd Pivot Cycles’ credit and collections department through the company’s first seven years of business

Dorel announces several hires across its bike division

WILTON, Ct. (BRAIN) — Dorel Industries, parent of the Cycling Sports Group and its stable of brands, which include Cannondale, GT, Schwinn, Caloi and Sugoi, has added several new hires in the new year in its recreational division. The company is also changing the name for its recreational segment from Recreational/Leisure to Dorel Sports.

Light & Motion plans two-van dealer demo tour for 2015

MARINA, Calif. (BRAIN) — Light maker Light & Motion is running a nationwide demo program from this month through December 2015

Dealer Tour: Austin retailers seek niches in increasingly saturated market

AUSTIN, TX (BRAIN) — Take away the perpetually sunny skies, year-round mild temps and the ever-present Southern hospitality, and it might be easy to mistake Austin for Portland, Oregon. Striking similarities between the two cities include: a booming population of under a million, hip food trucks and new restaurants emerging on nearly every corner, a vibrant cycling culture that spans all disciplines, a large green space accessible from town, numerous bridges that connect the downtown with other parts of the city, a growing cycling infrastructure, a vibe that makes you want to stay awhile–and above all, the two cities are siblings in weirdness, with Portland having adopted and adapted the ‘Keep Austin Weird’ slogan for its own use. And the parallels don’t end there.

Scott Aspect 720 review

In some ways the Aspect is a reminder of an earlier, simpler age of do-it-all mountain bikes. While some manufacturers’ offerings are overtly pitched as budget race bikes or slackened-out trail bikes, the Scott keeps everything in the middle of the road.

  • Highs: Hugely versatile frame design, solid component spec, pleasingly agile at sensible speeds
  • Lows: Fork can start to get out of its depth, nervous handling at high speeds, on the heavy side

Frame and equipment: mostly a strong showing for this price point

We don’t expect massively innovative design and construction at this price, and the Scott’s frame is an entirely straightforward mechanically-shaped alloy number. We’d have liked to have seen a head tube ready for a tapered steerer, just to ease future fork upgrades. Heading back from there the key word is ‘stout’ – the main tubes are distinctly chunky, with a squared-off top tube and a subtly flattened down tube. The rear stays are generously proportioned too, especially the deep chainstays.

The scott’s oversized tubing means good stiffness but also a bit of surplus weight:

The Scott’s oversized tubing means good stiffness but also a bit of surplus weight

The kickstand mount on the non-driveside chainstay isn’t something that we’re used to seeing on mountain bikes, but the Scott is designed in mainland Europe, where people use bikes for more than just arsing around in the woods. The Aspect is intentionally designed to work well as an urban runaround too, and even has eyelets for a rack. All its cables are routed along the top tube.

The Aspect’s specification is a pretty good example of what you can reasonably expect for at this price level. It’s got a mostly Shimano Deore-based build, with non-series Shimano brakes and an Octalink triple crankset. An outboard-bearing crankset would be a bonus, but this is par for the course.

As is still commonplace on bikes of this sort, the crankset is a 42/32/22t triple. Combined with the 11-36t 10-speed cassette, you’re not likely to run out of gears in either direction. We were a little disappointed with the brake rotors, which are very basic Center Lock splined numbers with a thin steel spider. There are no issues with stopping, but the rotors are heavy and, well, just a bit nasty looking.

The aspect 720 is generously geared with triple chainrings and an 11-36t 10-speed cassette:

The Aspect 720 is generously geared with triple chainrings and an 11-36t 10-speed cassette

Scott has opted to kit the Aspect out with mid-sized 650b wheels, which have become the default choice in what seems like 10 minutes flat. Scott bought legendary component brand Syncros a few years back, so it’s no surprise to see Syncros branding on most of the Aspect’s finishing kit, including the rims. They’re shod with generously-sized but also shallow-treaded Schwalbe Rapid Robs, which wouldn’t be our first choice for loam or loose surfaces but make sense for the kind of all-round riding that Scott clearly has in mind for the Aspect.

The fork is a critical component on any bike, and the Scott’s Suntour model is competent enough. It’s the basic (read: heavy) version of the XCR, with a steel coil spring inside. You do get adjustable rebound damping and a remote lockout lever on the handlebar though.

Ride and handling: old-fashioned virtues – and vices

Despite its on-trend 650b wheels, the Scott is very much an all-round cross-country mountain bike of the traditional sort rather than a low-slung, raked-out trail weapon. The riding position is long and the 660mm-wide handlebar is narrow by modern standards.

If you want to tackle steep and loose trails, the Aspect isn’t the best choice – the relatively steep geometry means it starts to get nervous as the front points down, the narrow bar is more sensitive to steering inputs and the shallow-tread Schwalbes prioritise fast rolling over grip. The coil-sprung Suntour fork starts getting distractingly bouncy in the rough too. For this kind of riding, a bike like the Saracen Mantra Trail makes a lot more sense.

By nature the aspect 720 is a traditionalist xc machine, most at home on flatter trails:

By nature the Aspect 720 is a traditionalist XC machine, most at home on flatter trails

But the Scott is pitched at a broader market. High-speed nerves equate to low- and medium-speed agility, and on flatter twisty trails it can be hustled along at a fair old pace. There’s no escaping the fact that the Aspect is carrying a bit of excess weight at 13.3kg (29.3lb) – and that does start to work against you. But the faintly old-fashioned riding position is effective for sustained climbs, and on good surfaces the benefits of that fast-rolling rubber quickly becomes apparent.

The large-volume Rapid Robs have a big role to play in comfort too, because there isn’t much give in the chunky frame and oversized seatpost. All those frame fittings and bosses make the Scott extremely versatile though, so if you need a bike for the daily grind in the week and some not-too-demanding off-road fun at the weekend, the Aspect could easily hit the spot.

This article was originally published in Mountain Biking UK magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.








Scott Aspect 720 review

In some ways the Aspect is a reminder of an earlier, simpler age of do-it-all mountain bikes. While some manufacturers’ offerings are overtly pitched as budget race bikes or slackened-out trail bikes, the Scott keeps everything in the middle of the road.

  • Highs: Hugely versatile frame design, solid component spec, pleasingly agile at sensible speeds
  • Lows: Fork can start to get out of its depth, nervous handling at high speeds, on the heavy side

Frame and equipment: mostly a strong showing for this price point

We don’t expect massively innovative design and construction at this price, and the Scott’s frame is an entirely straightforward mechanically-shaped alloy number. We’d have liked to have seen a head tube ready for a tapered steerer, just to ease future fork upgrades. Heading back from there the key word is ‘stout’ – the main tubes are distinctly chunky, with a squared-off top tube and a subtly flattened down tube. The rear stays are generously proportioned too, especially the deep chainstays.

The scott’s oversized tubing means good stiffness but also a bit of surplus weight:

The Scott’s oversized tubing means good stiffness but also a bit of surplus weight

The kickstand mount on the non-driveside chainstay isn’t something that we’re used to seeing on mountain bikes, but the Scott is designed in mainland Europe, where people use bikes for more than just arsing around in the woods. The Aspect is intentionally designed to work well as an urban runaround too, and even has eyelets for a rack. All its cables are routed along the top tube.

The Aspect’s specification is a pretty good example of what you can reasonably expect for at this price level. It’s got a mostly Shimano Deore-based build, with non-series Shimano brakes and an Octalink triple crankset. An outboard-bearing crankset would be a bonus, but this is par for the course.

As is still commonplace on bikes of this sort, the crankset is a 42/32/22t triple. Combined with the 11-36t 10-speed cassette, you’re not likely to run out of gears in either direction. We were a little disappointed with the brake rotors, which are very basic Center Lock splined numbers with a thin steel spider. There are no issues with stopping, but the rotors are heavy and, well, just a bit nasty looking.

The aspect 720 is generously geared with triple chainrings and an 11-36t 10-speed cassette:

The Aspect 720 is generously geared with triple chainrings and an 11-36t 10-speed cassette

Scott has opted to kit the Aspect out with mid-sized 650b wheels, which have become the default choice in what seems like 10 minutes flat. Scott bought legendary component brand Syncros a few years back, so it’s no surprise to see Syncros branding on most of the Aspect’s finishing kit, including the rims. They’re shod with generously-sized but also shallow-treaded Schwalbe Rapid Robs, which wouldn’t be our first choice for loam or loose surfaces but make sense for the kind of all-round riding that Scott clearly has in mind for the Aspect.

The fork is a critical component on any bike, and the Scott’s Suntour model is competent enough. It’s the basic (read: heavy) version of the XCR, with a steel coil spring inside. You do get adjustable rebound damping and a remote lockout lever on the handlebar though.

Ride and handling: old-fashioned virtues – and vices

Despite its on-trend 650b wheels, the Scott is very much an all-round cross-country mountain bike of the traditional sort rather than a low-slung, raked-out trail weapon. The riding position is long and the 660mm-wide handlebar is narrow by modern standards.

If you want to tackle steep and loose trails, the Aspect isn’t the best choice – the relatively steep geometry means it starts to get nervous as the front points down, the narrow bar is more sensitive to steering inputs and the shallow-tread Schwalbes prioritise fast rolling over grip. The coil-sprung Suntour fork starts getting distractingly bouncy in the rough too. For this kind of riding, a bike like the Saracen Mantra Trail makes a lot more sense.

By nature the aspect 720 is a traditionalist xc machine, most at home on flatter trails:

By nature the Aspect 720 is a traditionalist XC machine, most at home on flatter trails

But the Scott is pitched at a broader market. High-speed nerves equate to low- and medium-speed agility, and on flatter twisty trails it can be hustled along at a fair old pace. There’s no escaping the fact that the Aspect is carrying a bit of excess weight at 13.3kg (29.3lb) – and that does start to work against you. But the faintly old-fashioned riding position is effective for sustained climbs, and on good surfaces the benefits of that fast-rolling rubber quickly becomes apparent.

The large-volume Rapid Robs have a big role to play in comfort too, because there isn’t much give in the chunky frame and oversized seatpost. All those frame fittings and bosses make the Scott extremely versatile though, so if you need a bike for the daily grind in the week and some not-too-demanding off-road fun at the weekend, the Aspect could easily hit the spot.

This article was originally published in Mountain Biking UK magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.








New York, Chicago top Bicycling’s list of most cycling-friendly U.S. cities

EMMAUS, Pa. — Bicycling Magazine published its biennial ranking of the 50 most cycling-friendly cities in the United States in its October issue, which hit newsstands Sept.

Polygon Pave i7 urban bike review

With the growing popularity of two-wheeled commuting and the increasing number of cycleways popping up around the world, urban style bikes are becoming all the rage – and Polygon’s Pave i7 ‘utility bike’ is right on this global trend.

The Pave i7 is a sleek, stealthy?“utility bike”?ideally suited for the urban commando, featuring a carbon-belt drive with a seven-speed internal-hub gear system, and retailing at under AU$1,000 (UK prices TBC) through a direct-buy channel – it’s priced to go.

Weighing in at 12.34kg for the 50cm model delivered to?BikeRadar’s Asia-Pacific office in Sydney, the Pave i7 features a sturdy 6061 alloy frame and fork. Its biggest attention grabber, though, is the Gates belt drive, paired with a Shimano Nexus seven-speed internal gearing system that keeps the mechanical shifting components hidden from sight and also out of the elements.

Pulling the Pave out of its box, we were met with a preset torque wrench and small pedal spanner. (Polygon’s Australian online distributor, Bicycles Online, includes this – and it’s everything needed to complete the mostly assembled bike.)

This reviewer has always been a big fan of internal drive systems, so we were eager to take the i7 for a spin. The first thing we noticed right from the start was the Shimano trigger shifters were in reverse, compared with a normal mountain bike setup. This took some getting used to, and to be completely honest we were still getting it backwards days later.

Seven gears are hidden inside this rear hub. the downsides? internal geared hubs add weight, offer limited gear ranges and have additional resistance:

Seven gears are hidden inside this rear hub. The downsides? Internal geared hubs add weight, offer limited gear ranges and have additional resistance

Also blatantly apparent were the limitations of the?seven-speed setup. While fine for commuting and leisure riding in Adelaide, Austin or East Anglia, riders living in Sydney, Sheffield or San Francisco may find it simply does not have enough range when you’ve lost your grunt when forced to take hilly routes. This is less than ideal when creeping up roads with gradients closing in on double-digit percentages. After all, there is nothing worse than arriving at the office after just a short pedal and feeling the need for a shower.

However, on flat roads and rolling hills, we found the Pave i7 to be an exceptional ride. The longer lasting, lower maintenance belt-drive and internal gear systems provide a silent, almost seamless ride void of rattles and clicks often associated with chain-driven, multi-speed external gearsets. The belt also requires no oil, so say goodbye to messy grease stains on the legs or worse – your trousers.

The belt is tensioned via turning the eccentric assembly within the frame. unfortunately it's an extra component that can creak - as ours did:

The belt is tensioned via turning the eccentric assembly within the frame. Unfortunately it’s an extra component that can creak – as ours did

Unfortunately it wasn’t all perfect, with the crankset/bottom bracket on our test sample making some groaning noise under stress. A little grease fixed it right up, but this requires specialty tools – something to consider, because the bike is often sold online and shipped to your door in a box.

The Pave i7 floats effortlessly over the tarmac, especially with the 700×35c Schwalbe Citizen tyres mounted on Rigida alloy double-wall wheels. The Citizens are bulletproof and possess enough grooved traction channels to keep you both puncture- and worry-free on your daily commute, even under damp conditions. The Pave i7 feels both stable and responsive and, fitted with an Entity road saddle, its ride is anything but harsh.

Standard v-brakes work just fine, but a little rain will cause a quick loss in performance. disc brakes often more consistent performance and greater durability:

Standard V-brakes work just fine, but a little rain will cause a quick loss in performance. Disc brakes offer more consistent performance and greater durability

For stopping action, the i7 uses Tektro levers connected to alloy V-brakes, which are adequate, but not as precise as disc brakes, especially over rain-kissed roads.

With just two sizes available, the Pave gives up the precise fit offered by bikes available in a greater range. Even so, we were perfectly comfortable for shorter journeys – and the quick release adjustable seat post makes for a quick fitting process.

The final verdict is simple. At this price, with carbon belt-drive and Shimano Nexus hub gearing, Polygon’s Pave i7 is a fantastic buy if you live in flatter areas. If your home’s in more mountainous urban territory, however, you might want to consider Polygon’s pricier (AU$2,199) sibling, the Zenith Di2, which features Shimano’s Alfine 11-speed internal drive hub system and has disc brakes to boot.