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Rally for Safer Bike Lanes on Wed Oct 17, City Hall, 6pm

From the Email:

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160 times.

That’s how many times each year first responders are called to a crash involving a person on a bike being struck by a car, according to Cambridge Police Department data.

That’s 160 times too many.

One more number for you: three. That is how many people have died walking on Cambridge streets this year, all within a mile of City Hall.

Cambridge Bicycle Safety invites you to join us at City Hall next Wednesday, October 17 from 6:00 – 7:00 pm for our most important event of the year. We are launching our petition campaign to complete the city-wide network of protected bike lanes in five years by putting 160 bikes on the Cambridge City Hall lawn. One for every crash. Meet people from all walks of life in Cambridge who bike and walk, hear their stories, and show city officials your support for safer streets. Please bring your bike and bike lights!

A citywide network of protected bike lanes would make 40% of crashes physically impossible, and many others less likely. The infrastructure changes we’re advocating for—separated lanes and traffic calming—will also make the city safer for pedestrians and help avoid tragedies such as this year.

The City has recognized the importance of protected bike lanes but is not moving quickly enough to implement them in response to crash data and the recent deaths of bicyclists. There are approximately 20 miles of protected bike lanes specified in the 2015 Bicycle Plan but in the past three years, only 1.2 miles have been built. In addition, there have been several cases of the city not following through on the vision in the Bicycle Plan when it rebuilds streets.

Our petition, which has already been signed by over 1,300 people, calls for:

  • A commitment to build the network by 2023 with a mix of permanent construction and quick-build approaches, installing a minimum of two miles per year.
  • In 2019, the city funds the development of a 25% preliminary design for the complete network.
  • A commitment to comply with the City’s Bicycle Plan whenever a street is reconstructed or improvements are made.

Join us in showing city officials that there is widespread support for implementing these lanes in order to create a safe, city-wide protected network that serves residents of all ages and abilities.

We look forward to seeing you on Wednesday, October 17!

Bike community mourns death of mechanic and activist who died in cougar attack

SEATTLE (BRAIN) — The bike community across the country, including colleagues at at least two bike shops, is mourning the death of S.J.

Action Alert: Council To Vote On Inman Sq Redesign TODAY

From the email:

Tonight, the City Council will vote on whether the Inman Square intersection redesign project, now a two-year process, goes forward. These safety improvements have been proposed in response to the death of Amanda Phillips in the intersection in 2016 and because of the high crash rates and injuries for people biking, walking and driving. The current design was not our first choice as we laid out in our recommendations last year, but city staff should be commended for including needed protected infrastructure throughout the intersection and some best-in-class transit improvements. We all need to contact the City Council and let them know that we cannot wait another two years for a protected intersection in Inman Square!

Take Action:

  • Contact city councilors at council@cambridgema.gov (and bccinfo@cambridgebikesafety.org) and ask them to vote in support of moving the Inman Square redesign forward because we can’t wait any longer for protected bicycle lanes and other Vision Zero safety improvements.

The existing Inman Square intersection is dangerous by design for all road users. In terms of major squares of Cambridge, it is as bad as Porter Square in overall crashes, and second only to Central Square for bicycle crashes. Pedestrian crashes also occur due to the long intersection that encourages speeding and the misalignment of crosswalks with desire lines. Historically, a third of all crashes in the intersection resulted in injuries requiring EMS.

Other users of the intersection will also benefit from redesigning for safety: with substantially reduced crossing distances and shorter signal times, pedestrians will face less delay and lower vehicle speeds. Bus riders from will benefit from the city’s first floating bus stops, which do not require merging with traffic, and a proposed queue jump that allows buses to get ahead of traffic at the leading signal. This means less delay on the 69 connecting East Cambridge.

The city is ready to move forward and this vote is the last step. Help support protected bike lanes by emailing council@cambridgema.gov (bcc info@cambridgebikesafety.org) and/or attend the city council meeting tonight, May 21, at Cambridge City Hall at 5:30 to speak on this subject (register here, call 617-349-4280, or sign up in person).

  • Read our full statement on the proposed redesign.

  • Read the home rule petition the Council will be voting on.

A little more on what’s happening tonight:

The City Council is voting on a home rule petition which is necessary move the design forward, because a part of Vellucci plaza will be moved across the street. If the city council votes yes the petition will be sent to the statehouse for approval. Then the city will start building protected bike lanes in Inman square!

If the Council votes no, the city will likely have to start from scratch with a new design which doesn’t touch Vellucci plaza. And who knows what will happen for future bike lane projects.

PeopleForBikes to hold second PlacesForBikes conference this week

INDIANAPOLIS (BRAIN) — The second annual PlacesForBikes Conference takes place this week here. Organized by PeopleForBikes, the conference kicks off Tuesday afternoon and runs through Thursday. The conference brings together about 300 attendees, ranging from city officials and advocates to bike industry leaders and retailers to focus on the challenges and opportunities for building better bike infrastructure

Bike share association claims victory as Oklahoma bill dies in committee

OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. (BRAIN) — The North American Bikeshare Association is claiming another victory as an Oklahoma bill that would have pre-empted local control of dockless bikeshare did not make it to the House floor last week.

BCU Fighting To Get Better Bike Lanes On Longfellow

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Call your city rep and let them know you want this!

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Colorado Legislature passes ‘Safety Stop’ bill

DENVER (BRAIN) — Colorado could become the third state with a law that allows bicyclists to treat some stop signs like yield signs and red lights like stop signs.

You can now subscribe to an e-bike or ’smart bike’

NEW YORK (BRAIN) — The Dutch e-bike brand VanMoof is launching a subscription program for its bikes, starting at $19 per month. The fee provides subscribers with unlimited exclusive access to their bike as long as they need it. The fee also covers maintenance and a theft recovery service

Backcountry.com adds house-brand clothing, with bike clothes to come

PARK CITY, Utah (BRAIN) — E-commerce retailer Backcountry.com this week announced a new line of branded apparel for outdoor and casual use and said it would add mountain bike items to its new house brand later this year. The Backcountry Lifestyle collection includes technical rainwear, T-shirts, dresses, shorts, pants, hoodies and shirts

New York City to allow pedal-assist e-bikes, bans throttled bikes

NEW YORK (BRAIN) — Mayor Bill de Blasio on Tuesday announced that the city will allow use of pedal-assist e-bikes, but will continue to ban throttled e-bikes that are capable of speeds above 20 mph.  The state of New York does not regulate e-bikes, which remain technically illegal to use in the state, although legislation is pending in Albany. Last year de Blasio launched a campaign to crack down on e-bikes in the city, particularly throttled bikes used by delivery workers. But now he said he has instructed the city transportation department to begin the rule making process to allow pedal assist bikes