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World Remembrance Day This Sunday Nov 18th

From The BCU:

Sunday is World Day of Remembrance. Will you join the Massachusetts Vision Zero Coalition in honoring victims of traffic crashes?

World Day of Remembrance
Sunday, Nov. 18 // 2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Learn more + RSVP

The day will begin with a ghost bike ceremony at 12:30 pm, followed by a vigil and silent march from the State House to City Hall to demand swifter action to prevent traffic deaths.

We know you are angry and sad about recent fatalities on our streets. So are we. These kinds of tragedies are avoidable with better, proactive planning and policy. Stand with us to show that life-saving infrastructure improvements cannot wait.

While Boston has made some progress toward reducing injurious crashes, change has not come quickly enough. In 2017, there were 1,162 cyclist and pedestrian incidents that prompted an EMS response — or more than 3 per day. Meanwhile, Boston’s bike fatality rate continues to be higher than the rates in comparable cities. (It’s one reason Boston fell this year to #20 in Bicycling Magazine’s ranking of the best bike cities in America.)

Friday’s fatal crash, in which a dump truck driver hit and killed BU graduate student Meng Jin as he biked near the Museum of Science, serves as another devastating reminder of the dangers posed by deadly street design. (A ghost bike ceremony will be held on Sunday before the rally and demonstration; for more information and to RSVP head here.)

Meng Jin Ghost Bike Ceremony
Sunday, Nov 18 // 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Intersection of Charles River Dam & Museum Way
Learn more + RSVP

On Sunday, members of the Coalition will be placing silhouettes at crash sites throughout the Boston area, as well as statewide, as part of the #CrashNotAccident awareness campaign. Crashes are not accidents — they’re the tragic, preventable results of inadequate planning and policy. People make mistakes; our streets must be designed so those mistakes are not fatal. Please join us to ensure that these lives are not forgotten and to demand safe streets for all in our communities.

Take part in the following memorial actions:

12:30 pm – Meng Jin Ghost Bike Ceremony at Charles River Dam & Museum Way
1:45 pm – Gather on the steps of Massachusetts State House for a Memorial Vigil
2:00 pm – Program for Memorial Vigil begins
2:45 pm – Silent Walk of Remembrance to Boston City Hall Plaza to demand safer roads
3:30 pm – Event ends

Please dress warmly and wear yellow in remembrance of those we’ve lost to traffic crashes.

We also encourage you to invite your elected state and local representatives. Show them the human toll of dangerous street design and urge them to support Vision Zero. You can find your city legislators here, and your state legislators here.

Help us spread the word via social media by using the following hashtags before and during the event: #WDoR2018 #CrashNotAccident #SafetyOverSpeed #VisionZero

The vast majority of these traffic crashes are preventable through engineering, education and enforcement. In numbers, we can recognize our loved ones, and also demand action from our elected officials.

We hope to see you there on Sunday, November 18th.

The post World Day of Remembrance, Sunday Nov. 18 appeared first on Boston Cyclists Union.

Another preventable tragedy and ACTIONS you can take to help

From Cambridge Bike Safety:

Last Friday we lost a member of our community. Meng Jin was killed while biking on the Craigie Bridge near the Museum of Science. He was a grad student at Boston University studying economics and had just arrived in Cambridge two months ago to start school. We cannot imagine the pain and grief his family is now going through. Our hearts go out to them.

MassDOT and DCR were told a long time ago that this bridge badly needs bicycle infrastructure, something which is obvious to anyone who tries to commute across it. They promised to work on it after the Longfellow bridge project completed earlier this year, but it never happened. Meng is dead because MassDOT and DCR prioritized six lanes of motor vehicle traffic over safe bike infrastructure.

While we can’t bring him back, we can tell our governments that this isunacceptable and that these deaths are preventable. While the Craigie Bridge is under DCR jurisdiction, Cambridge has control over most of the roads leading up to the Craigie Bridge and a responsibility to keep people safe on them. Furthermore, the O’Brien Highway is identified as requiring protected bicycle lanes in the Cambridge Bike Plan, and Cambridge must work to build out its plan for 20 miles of protected bike lanes—including proactively engaging with state agencies—to prevent future injuries and deaths.

ACTIONS

1. Attend the World Day of Remembrance this Sunday, Nov 18 at 2pm at the Massachusetts State House, and Ghost Bike Ceremony at 12:30pm near Museum of Science. 

We will gather to mourn the people who have died on our roads this year and to tell our elected officials that protected bike lanes save lives. We will not accept any more heartless trade-offs in our streets.

Please tell everyone you know about this, including your elected officials, both local and state. We need a huge turnout to show our elected officials that many people care deeply about this, and that their decisions affect the lives of many people. Please attend this event if at all possible.

Earlier that day there is a ghost bike ceremony in memory of Meng Jin. Meet us at 12:30pm at the intersection of Charles River Dam Road and Museum way, near the Museum of Science where Meng Jin was killed. After the ceremony we will ride to the World Day of Remembrance event at the State House.

2. Email Cambridge officials council@cambridgema.gov,ldepasquale@cambridgema.gov and cc clerk@cambridgema.gov andinfo@cambridgebikesafety.org and tell them:

  • We want them to stand with us at the World Day of Remembrance so that they can hear the stories of people who are closest to the pain and learn from them.
  • We want them to support rapidly building out the city’s own plan for 20 miles of protected bike lanes because protected bike lanes save lives.

3. Email your state representatives (find them here) and tell them:

  • We want them to stand with us at the World Day of Remembrance. Their support is crucial for making changes happen at the state level.
  • If the State House acts quickly there is a chance they can pass the piece of the bike omnibus bill which requires state and state-contracted trucks to have safety side-guards and convex mirrors. Tell your state representative that they should help pass this bill to keep us safe around trucks. (Only the State House can help here; the State Senate has already passed this bill.)

Every death leaves our community hurting and scared. We will work together to make sure our streets show compassion instead of violence.

Street Life Update

From Livable Streets

Weigh In on the Massachusetts Pedestrian Plan

Image: The Boston Globe

A draft plan of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation’s statewide Pedestrian Transportation Plan is available for public comment through October 17th. We need you to give feedback in order to make the plan as strong as it can be. Review the plan here and act now!

City of Boston Releases Vision Zero Update

Image: WalkUP Roslindale

Earlier this month, the City of Boston released a 2017/2018 Vision Zero Update, tracking their progress in reducing fatal and severe crashes, and summarizing their progress on safety improvement policies and projects. In addition, the City announced five new Neighborhood Slow Streets zones, which will receive traffic calming measures and safety improvements that will provide visual and physical cues to slow drivers to 20 mph.

The Massachusetts Vision Zero Coalition will be releasing a third annual progress report for the City of Boston in early 2019. The Coalition is committed to reviewing the City’s performance annually to ensure public accountability in reaching its goals. To read the Coalition’s 2016 and 2017 reports, click here, and stay tuned for the 2018 report.

If you are interested in learning more about Vision Zero efforts around the country, check out the Vision Zero Cities conference taking place in NYC on November 7 and 8.

Get in the Zone at Our October Advocacy Committee Meeting

AdvocacyCommitteeWalk.png

What is zoning and transit-oriented development (TOD)? How does it affect you, your neighborhood, and what gets built (or not built)?

Join us at our next Advocacy Committee meeting on Wednesday, October 24th as we welcome Jarred Johnson of Transit Matters/Codman Square CDC and a guest from the City of Somerville (currently undergoing a citywide re-zoning process) to shed light on all things zoning and TOD. Learn more about current zoning and displacement issues in Metro Boston, as well as tips for better advocacy in this space that intersects so closely with transportation issues.

RSVP to let us know you can join us!

Register for Our Upcoming StreetTalks

Seats are filling up fast for our two upcoming StreetTalks. RSVP now to reserve your space!

Broken Buses + Incomplete Streets: Addressing Inequity in our Transportation System

Everyone in Metro Boston deserves safe, affordable, and reliable transportation options, but communities of color have been chronically neglected when it comes to prioritizing improvements on our streets. Join us for our fall StreetTalk where we will discuss why and how city transportation planning needs to address these systemic inequities head-on.

Event Details:
Thursday, October 25, 2018, 5:30-8:30 pm
@ Roxbury Innovation Center, Think Space
2300 Washington Street, Boston 02119

RSVP

StreetTalk 10-in-1

Join us for the 8th Annual StreetTalk 10-in-1 as we invite 10 innovative transportation and community thinkers to take the stage and share their big ideas. Enjoy 10 rapid-fire “TED”-style talks, with plenty of inspiration to be had! One of our most popular events of the year – don’t miss it!

Event Details:
Tuesday, December 4, 2018, 5:30-8:30 pm
@ Old South Meeting House
310 Washington Street, Boston 02108

RSVP

Job Opportunities

  • Manager of Fare Inspection Design, MBTA: The MBTA seeks a Manager for Fare Inspection Design to design the fare inspection process under a proof of payment system as part of a new Automated Fare Collection project. The successful candidate must demonstrate attention to detail, understanding of complex technological and policy issues, and ability to work on a cross-functional team. To learn more and apply, click here.
  • Director of Transition, AFC 2.0, MBTA:  The MBTA seeks an experienced manager to complete the transition of internal and external customers to the MBTA’s next-generation fare collection system, Automated Fare Collection (AFC) 2.0. The successful candidate must demonstrate a depth of experience in working across a large organization, with a wide range of stakeholder groups, working directly with the public, and marshalling resources toward a time-critical milestone. To learn more and apply, click here.
  • Various, City of Boston Transportation Department: The City of Boston is still hiring to fill 20 new positions! To learn more, click here.

Rally for Safer Bike Lanes on Wed Oct 17, City Hall, 6pm

From the Email:

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160 times.

That’s how many times each year first responders are called to a crash involving a person on a bike being struck by a car, according to Cambridge Police Department data.

That’s 160 times too many.

One more number for you: three. That is how many people have died walking on Cambridge streets this year, all within a mile of City Hall.

Cambridge Bicycle Safety invites you to join us at City Hall next Wednesday, October 17 from 6:00 – 7:00 pm for our most important event of the year. We are launching our petition campaign to complete the city-wide network of protected bike lanes in five years by putting 160 bikes on the Cambridge City Hall lawn. One for every crash. Meet people from all walks of life in Cambridge who bike and walk, hear their stories, and show city officials your support for safer streets. Please bring your bike and bike lights!

A citywide network of protected bike lanes would make 40% of crashes physically impossible, and many others less likely. The infrastructure changes we’re advocating for—separated lanes and traffic calming—will also make the city safer for pedestrians and help avoid tragedies such as this year.

The City has recognized the importance of protected bike lanes but is not moving quickly enough to implement them in response to crash data and the recent deaths of bicyclists. There are approximately 20 miles of protected bike lanes specified in the 2015 Bicycle Plan but in the past three years, only 1.2 miles have been built. In addition, there have been several cases of the city not following through on the vision in the Bicycle Plan when it rebuilds streets.

Our petition, which has already been signed by over 1,300 people, calls for:

  • A commitment to build the network by 2023 with a mix of permanent construction and quick-build approaches, installing a minimum of two miles per year.
  • In 2019, the city funds the development of a 25% preliminary design for the complete network.
  • A commitment to comply with the City’s Bicycle Plan whenever a street is reconstructed or improvements are made.

Join us in showing city officials that there is widespread support for implementing these lanes in order to create a safe, city-wide protected network that serves residents of all ages and abilities.

We look forward to seeing you on Wednesday, October 17!

Bike community mourns death of mechanic and activist who died in cougar attack

SEATTLE (BRAIN) — The bike community across the country, including colleagues at at least two bike shops, is mourning the death of S.J.

Action Alert: Council To Vote On Inman Sq Redesign TODAY

From the email:

Tonight, the City Council will vote on whether the Inman Square intersection redesign project, now a two-year process, goes forward. These safety improvements have been proposed in response to the death of Amanda Phillips in the intersection in 2016 and because of the high crash rates and injuries for people biking, walking and driving. The current design was not our first choice as we laid out in our recommendations last year, but city staff should be commended for including needed protected infrastructure throughout the intersection and some best-in-class transit improvements. We all need to contact the City Council and let them know that we cannot wait another two years for a protected intersection in Inman Square!

Take Action:

  • Contact city councilors at council@cambridgema.gov (and bccinfo@cambridgebikesafety.org) and ask them to vote in support of moving the Inman Square redesign forward because we can’t wait any longer for protected bicycle lanes and other Vision Zero safety improvements.

The existing Inman Square intersection is dangerous by design for all road users. In terms of major squares of Cambridge, it is as bad as Porter Square in overall crashes, and second only to Central Square for bicycle crashes. Pedestrian crashes also occur due to the long intersection that encourages speeding and the misalignment of crosswalks with desire lines. Historically, a third of all crashes in the intersection resulted in injuries requiring EMS.

Other users of the intersection will also benefit from redesigning for safety: with substantially reduced crossing distances and shorter signal times, pedestrians will face less delay and lower vehicle speeds. Bus riders from will benefit from the city’s first floating bus stops, which do not require merging with traffic, and a proposed queue jump that allows buses to get ahead of traffic at the leading signal. This means less delay on the 69 connecting East Cambridge.

The city is ready to move forward and this vote is the last step. Help support protected bike lanes by emailing council@cambridgema.gov (bcc info@cambridgebikesafety.org) and/or attend the city council meeting tonight, May 21, at Cambridge City Hall at 5:30 to speak on this subject (register here, call 617-349-4280, or sign up in person).

  • Read our full statement on the proposed redesign.

  • Read the home rule petition the Council will be voting on.

A little more on what’s happening tonight:

The City Council is voting on a home rule petition which is necessary move the design forward, because a part of Vellucci plaza will be moved across the street. If the city council votes yes the petition will be sent to the statehouse for approval. Then the city will start building protected bike lanes in Inman square!

If the Council votes no, the city will likely have to start from scratch with a new design which doesn’t touch Vellucci plaza. And who knows what will happen for future bike lane projects.

PeopleForBikes to hold second PlacesForBikes conference this week

INDIANAPOLIS (BRAIN) — The second annual PlacesForBikes Conference takes place this week here. Organized by PeopleForBikes, the conference kicks off Tuesday afternoon and runs through Thursday. The conference brings together about 300 attendees, ranging from city officials and advocates to bike industry leaders and retailers to focus on the challenges and opportunities for building better bike infrastructure

Bike share association claims victory as Oklahoma bill dies in committee

OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. (BRAIN) — The North American Bikeshare Association is claiming another victory as an Oklahoma bill that would have pre-empted local control of dockless bikeshare did not make it to the House floor last week.

BCU Fighting To Get Better Bike Lanes On Longfellow

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Call your city rep and let them know you want this!

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Colorado Legislature passes ‘Safety Stop’ bill

DENVER (BRAIN) — Colorado could become the third state with a law that allows bicyclists to treat some stop signs like yield signs and red lights like stop signs.