christmas

League of American Bicyclists recognizes Bicycle Friendly Businesses in all 50 states

WASHINGTON, D.C. (BRAIN) — In celebration of National Bike to Work Week, the League of American Bicyclists welcomes 34 new and renewingBicycle Friendly Businesses.

L.A. retailer’s crowdfunding campaign will expand the shop’s leather business

LOS ANGELES (BRAIN) – When it comes to retail, Chris Kelly has always been one to think outside the box. From closing his store, Topanga Creek Outpost, mid-week for staff and customer adventures, which he has dubbed ‘Unpredict your Wednesday’, to ditching products sold on Amazon more than five years ago, Kelly has spent the better part of his career working to set his shop apart from the rest

Jenson USA and Free Agent give away 60 bikes to students

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (BRAIN) — Jenson USA and Free Agent BMX Bicycles handed out 60 bikes to elementary students during the annual East Hills Holiday Bicycle Giveaway on Christmas Eve.  The “Kommute For Kids” is a Jenson USA community program designed to encourage its employees to embrace the many benefits of the cycling lifestyle while earning bicycles for the Holiday Giveaway. By commuting to work via bicycle, individual Jenson USA employees log miles toward the donation of a bike.

Liv unveils brand new line of women’s mountain bikes

Liv, the sister brand to global cycling Giant, has released a whole new and updated range of full-suspension mountain bikes for women. Designed from the ground up to suit the geometry needs of women and how they ride, according to Liv, these are serious, top-of-the-range bikes for technical terrain, fast racing, and all-mountain adventuring — with no compromise on componentry or the fun factor. 

  • Best women’s bikes: a buyers guide to help you find what you need
  • From unisex to female-friendly: six tweaks for better bike fit
  • 12 Christmas presents for mountain biking women

Say goodbye to the Lust and Intrigue

While the names may have been a little risqué, there’s no denying that both the Liv Lust and the Liv Intrigue were very popular bikes. So popular in fact that the Liv Lust Advanced, the top-of-the-range model, outsold every other model of mountain bike that Liv and brother-brand Giant produced in 2015. Yes, every model, men’s/unisex bikes included. However, for 2017 these bikes are no more, having been replaced by brand new, updated models. 

Say hello to the Hail, Pique and Embolden

First things first — the names are a definite improvement! But there’s a lot more to be interested in here than simply revamped brand nomenclature. These full-suspension offerings are designed to be serious, rip-ready bikes, and Liv states it has spent a lot of time and research getting these right.

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The Hail is a 160mm-travel all-mountain bike designed with enduro racing in mind. The Pique is an aggressive XC bike and the Embolden is a trail-ready bike with 120mm of travel and a single-pivot rear suspension system. 

Women’s specific geometry

Liv has long been the champion of women’s specific bikes, with its entire range featuring bikes with a geometry designed for female riders. 

Within mountain biking, the trend over the last couple of years has been for bike brands to move towards a unisex frame for both male and female riders, with women’s specific finishing kit and contact points. Specialized and Scott have both made that move on at least some of their women’s mountain bike lines for 2017. However, Liv is bucking that trend with the Liv, Hail and Embolden all featuring women’s specific geometry. 

1. Steeper head angle

2. Raised bottom bracket

3. Trunnion mounted shock

4. Updated Maestro suspension system 

5. Advanced Forged Composite Link

High performance and expert input

The new Hail, Pique and Embolden

Liv Hail 

  • Two carbon-framed Advanced models — the Hail Advanced 0 and the Hail Advanced 1
  • Two aluminium-framed models — the Hail 1 and Hail 2
  • Boost hub spacing
  • 100mm dropper seatpost on all models
  • Maestro suspension system
  • Shorter chainstays for more agile and manoeuvrable handling
  • Schwalbe Magic Mary front and Hans Dampf rear tyres
  • 1x drivetrain (SRAM Eagle on the Advanced 0, Shimano SLX/XT on Advanced 1)
  • Dual-position 160mm forks that can be locked to 130mm travel, altering the geometry of the bike for easier and more efficient climbing
  • Liv Hail Advanced 0: Not available in the UK / $5,350 / AU$7,999
  • Liv Hail Advanced 1: £3,749 / $5,350 / AU$5,699
  • Liv Hail 1: £3,099 / $4,200 / AU$4,499
  • Liv Hail 2: £2,499 / $3,250 / Not available in Australia

Liv Pique

  • The carbon-framed Pique Advanced 0, 1 and 2
  • The aluminium framed Pique 2 and 3
  • The Pique Advanced SX with 140mm forks and 120mm rear suspension
  • Boost hub spacing
  • 100mm dropper seatpost on all models
  • Maestro suspension system
  • Lower standover and shorter chain stays than the Liv Lust
  • Liv Pique Advanced 0: Not available in the UK / $8,975 / AU$9,799
  • Liv Pique Advanced 1: Not available in the UK / $4,950 / AU$5,799
  • Liv Pique Advanced 2: £2,899 / $3,300 / Not available in Australia
  • Liv Pique Advanced SX: £2,499 / $4,125 / Not available in Australia
  • Liv Pique  2: £2,499 / $3,150 / AU$4,999
  • Liv Pique  3: £1,899 / $2,375 / AU$2,999

Liv Embolden

The Embolden is the new entry-level, alloy-framed, full suspension mountain bike in the Liv off-road range. It’s a trail-focussed bike with 120mm of suspension front and rear, single pivot point suspension system, 27.5 wheels and low standover. Designed to be a confidence-inspiring ride with plenty of traction and stopping power, Liv describes it as “nimble and playful while providing a stable, trustworthy feel.”
The top-of-the-line Embolden 1 features a SRAM NX 1×11 drivetrain with Shimano M395 hydraulic disc brakes, Fox 34 Rhythm forks with Boost spacing and a Fox Float rear shock. 
  • Liv Embolden 1: Not available in the UK / $2,100 / Not available in Australia
  • Liv Embolden 2: £1,099 / $1,365 / Not available in Australia

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Black Friday 2016: get ready for some great deals for cyclists

Welcome to the BikeRadar Black Friday bike deals page, where we are collecting all of the best deals on bikes, components and accessories for Black Friday 2016.

  • BikeRadar’s Christmas gift guide
  • Best mountain bike: how to choose the right one for you
  • Best women’s mountain bike: how to choose the right bike for you

If last year was anything to go by, there’ll be big discounts on bikes, wheels, groupsets, components, accessories, clothing and lots more — and this is the best place to find them all.

Black Friday itself will take place on 25 November, but we could see deals announced before then — and so we’re readying this as the best place for cyclists to come in search of a good deal.

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What is Black Friday?

Black Friday started as an American shopping event that brings big savings to recommended retail prices for a limited time, but it’s well and truly made its way to the UK as well.

While it started off as a way to drive more shoppers into stores, many major retailers have started to offer big savings online too. And it’s working. An incredible £1.1bn was spent on Black Friday last year in the UK alone, up from £810m the previous year.

It’s not to be confused with Cyber Monday, though, which will take place on 28 November, and is definitely aimed at online shoppers only. 

When do Black Friday deals go live?

BikeRadar’s guide to 2016’s best Black Friday deals for cyclists

  • Sign up to BikeRadar’s weekly email newsletter

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Joy Ride ambassadors meet, tour Bell, set to launch MTB riding groups

SANTA CRUZ, Calif.

Guru Cycles assets to be sold at auction next month

St. LAURENT, Quebec — Guru Cycles will not be continuing under its current ownership; its remaining assets, including its trademarks and manufacturing equipment, will be auctioned next month. The company told its dealers in December that it was hoping to reorganize after incurring unmanageable debts stemming from a factory move early last year.

BikeRadar Bargains: January bike sale madness

Didn’t find a bike under the Christmas tree? Did Santa forget that new groupset you were after? Don’t worry – the January sales are here so you can buy yourself what you actually wanted, and for a fraction of the cost. We call that winning. 

January sales is something of a misnomer, as most of the major retailers have already started reducing products significantly – some even before Christmas. There are significant discounts on bikes, parts and accessories, plus clothing and protection. Discounts are mostly in the region of 30 to 50 percent, but there are discounts as high as 60 percent plus on some items. 

Related: BikeRadar Gear of the Year

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Kona Process 167 (2015) mountain bike £3999.99 £1895.13

Fancy a rather lush, full-suspension, all-mountain bike to tackle some interesting terrain in the new year? Would having more than 50 percent off the price tempt you further? For under two grand you can get the Kona Process 167, with slack angles for confidence on technical descents, SRAM X1 and X01 1×11 groupset, Rockshox Lyrik fork, Rockshox Vivid Aid shock and SRAM Guide brakes. Not bad, not bad at all. 

Available now with a 53 percent discount from Wiggle

Shimano Ultegra 6800 11-Speed groupset  £999.98 £389.99

Felt F7 (2015) mountain bike £1,150.00 £575.00

Thule Sweden AB TH9104 clip-on rear cycle carrier £94.99 £74.99

Marin Rocky Ridge 7.6 mountain bike 2015 £2,500.00 £1,189.00

Colnago World Cup road bike 2015 £1,499.95 £799.95

Boardman Road Team Carbon road bike £999.99 £749.99

Cannondale CAAD10 105 2014 road bike £1,299.99 £799.00

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

BikeRadar staff bike: Mondraker Foxy XR

Firstly, welcome to this new Staff Bike column on BikeRadar. Staffers will be introducing their own bikes, spelling out what parts we picked and why, and updating information on how our choices fare, in this ongoing column.

Just before Christmas I introduced my long-term test bike for 2015, the latest Mondraker Foxy XR, in this ‘just in’ article. What I didn’t mention was that the bike was in fact my personal bike I had decided to buy.

There were many reasons for my purchase, but the main one was so I’d have a stable test bed for other components. I also wanted to try to rekindle a bit of emotion towards bicycles, something that gets worked out of you when you spend the majority of your time riding other people’s bikes. That’s just the way it is.

Mondraker foxy xr 2015:

The size XL Foxy is every bit as long as it looks – and then some

So why the Foxy? Well, after hearing great things from most of the staff around me I wanted to try out forward geometry for myself. Another big selling point was the unusually large sizing that the forward geometry bikes tend to have. I’m more than 6ft tall with ludicrously lanky proportions, so if a big bike is going to make sense for anyone, then it should be me. ?

Which reminds me… being tall and shopping for bikes is a similar experience to having big feet and shopping for shoes. I can normally go into a shop and find say three pairs of shoes that I like, but I’d be lucky to find one pair that will be stocked in a UK size 12. It’s the same story with bikes. I found several bikes that fitted my requirements perfectly, then I’d have a look at the size charts and there’d either be no size XL, or the XL on offer would be smaller than the size large I was already riding. In fact I’d like to send a big shout out to Whyte, who disappointed me a lot by not offering an XL version of their lovely G-150 Works!

Anyway, the Foxy arrived and within an hour it was fully assembled with no problems. No annoying internal cable routing, nothing stressful at all… it all went almost too well. Oh wait, it did go too well – when I looped a wheelie outside the BikeRadar workshop, I soon realised that my brakes were set up in a non-UK configuration! No bother though, the flip flop Formula CR1s took a matter of seconds to sort out.

The foxy transforming from a cardboard larvae to a stunning bike in next to no time: the foxy transforming from a cardboard larvae to a stunning bike in next to no time

Building the Foxy was drama free, apart from when I failed to reverse the brakes that is

One together it took me a while to actually appreciate the proportions of this thing. It’s a behemoth. With a wheelbase just shy of 49in at 1240mm, it has too much overhang to really be safe to stick on the back of my car.

My first ride on the Foxy took place at Cwmcarn’s enjoyable and varied Cafall trail. First impressions were alarming: “Oh my god I’m stretched in a way that I’ve never been before on a mountain bike, my back is at an unfamiliar angle and my arms feel like they do when the car seat is too far back!”

Another side-effect of that extra top tube length is that a 760mm bar has never felt so narrow.

I’ll be honest, nothing felt comfortable for about 20 minutes. The brakes were wooden as could be, I’d forgotten what it felt like to have a front shifter and I’d not dialled in any of the suspension properly yet.

Conditions were gloopy in places but the triple compound Maxxis Ardents did a fine job – they certainly punch above their weight. The 30mm stem on the Mondraker meant that the steering didn’t feel totally alien, and within no time I was chucking the bike about like a bit of an idiot.

It took some time to adjust the foxy's lanky nature: it took some time to adjust the foxy's lanky nature

My Foxy is quite possibly the first bike to actually fit me properly

I’ve never ridden a bike with a 680mm (26.77in) top tube before and that was the biggest difference for me. Despite initially being intimidated by the gate-like structure, it seemed easier than ever to climb up familiar trail sections and I finished the loop with no pain in my lower back, which I’ve become accustomed to.

Better than that, once the terrain start pointing downwards, it proved itself to be the most stable trail bike I’ve swung a leg over to date. Much like a long-wheelbase rally car, the Foxy can let it all hang out, but in a predictable and satisfying way. You do feel the length around slow uphill corners, though.

As for the not so good things… the DT Swiss rear axle is great, but it locates into an insert that is a press-fit into the frame. It’s not a very tight fit, and if you remove the back wheel a lot, then it’d be very easy to lose.?

The foxy's rear axle design is really annoying for those who regularly have the rear wheel out: the foxy's rear axle design is really annoying for those who regularly have the rear wheel out

I’ve really had to keep an eye on that black alloy cap

My gearing was also all over the place, and was chucking the chain off left, right and centre.

I was ready to bin the front mech and shifter after the first ride, but I shouldn’t have been so hasty. Turns out both the rear derailleur bolt and the mech hanger had worked loose, and after a dash of Loctite and a twist of torque, everything was spot on again. I’ve also made a right mess of the chainstay; big feet, a goofy pedal stance and abrasive trail centre surfaces have added a polished section to my rear chainstay.

Remember people, no matter how excited you are to ride, heli-tape first!

It turns out that my size 12 feet combined with a goofy stance do a pretty good job of polishing a frame.. : it turns out that my size 12 feet combined with a goofy stance do a pretty good job of polishing a frame..

It’s remarkable quite how quickly a bike can look used, here’s why fitting Heli-tape to a new frame is a good idea..

I’m pretty confident that the Foxy is the first bike to actually fit me properly. I can’t wait for longer nights so I can get more time in with it.

  • Costs this month: ?0?
  • Most frequented trail: Cafall, Cwmcarn








Mondraker Foxy XR: BikeRadar long-term test bike

Firstly, welcome to this new long term test format on BikeRadar. Staffers will now be frequently updating information on their long term test bikes in this new first person format.

We established last year that there was a real gap for honest, detailed and personal information on our bikes and this is my attempt to plug that gap. Expect detailed updates from all of us, on where we are riding, the kit we are using and exactly how we are getting along.

Just before Christmas I introduced my long-term test bike for 2015, the latest Mondraker Foxy XR, in this ‘just in’ article. What I didn’t mention was that the bike was in fact my personal bike. That’s because I took an unusual step – for a staffer – and decided to buy this bike with my own money.

There were many reasons for this, but the main one was so I’d have a stable test bed for other components. I also wanted to try to rekindle a bit of emotion towards bicycles, something that gets worked out of you when you spend the majority of your time riding other people’s bikes. That’s just the way it is.

Mondraker foxy xr 2015:

The size XL Foxy is every bit as long as it looks – and then some

So why the Foxy? Well, after hearing great things from most of the staff around me I wanted to try out forward geometry for myself. Another big selling point was the unusually large sizing that the forward geometry bikes tend to have. I’m more than 6ft tall with ludicrously lanky proportions, so if a big bike is going to make sense for anyone, then it should be me. ?

Which reminds me… being tall and shopping for bikes is a similar experience to having big feet and shopping for shoes. I can normally go into a shop and find say three pairs of shoes that I like, but I’d be lucky to find one pair that will be stocked in a UK size 12. It’s the same story with bikes. I found several bikes that fitted my requirements perfectly, then I’d have a look at the size charts and there’d either be no size XL, or the XL on offer would be smaller than the size large I was already riding. In fact I’d like to send a big shout out to Whyte, who disappointed me a lot by not offering an XL version of their lovely G-150 Works!

Anyway, the Foxy arrived and within an hour it was fully assembled with no problems. No annoying internal cable routing, nothing stressful at all… it all went almost too well. Oh wait, it did go too well – when I looped a wheelie outside the BikeRadar workshop, I soon realised that my brakes were set up in a non-UK configuration! No bother though, the flip flop Formula CR1s took a matter of seconds to sort out.

The foxy transforming from a cardboard larvae to a stunning bike in next to no time: the foxy transforming from a cardboard larvae to a stunning bike in next to no time

Building the Foxy was drama free, apart from when I failed to reverse the brakes that is

One together it took me a while to actually appreciate the proportions of this thing. It’s a behemoth. With a wheelbase just shy of 49in at 1240mm, it has too much overhang to really be safe to stick on the back of my car.

My first ride on the Foxy took place at Cwmcarn’s enjoyable and varied Cafall trail. First impressions were alarming: “Oh my god I’m stretched in a way that I’ve never been before on a mountain bike, my back is at an unfamiliar angle and my arms feel like they do when the car seat is too far back!”

Another side-effect of that extra top tube length is that a 760mm bar has never felt so narrow.

I’ll be honest, nothing felt comfortable for about 20 minutes. The brakes were wooden as could be, I’d forgotten what it felt like to have a front shifter and I’d not dialled in any of the suspension properly yet.

Conditions were gloopy in places but the triple compound Maxxis Ardents did a fine job – they certainly punch above their weight. The 30mm stem on the Mondraker meant that the steering didn’t feel totally alien, and within no time I was chucking the bike about like a bit of an idiot.

It took some time to adjust the foxy's lanky nature: it took some time to adjust the foxy's lanky nature

My Foxy is quite possibly the first bike to actually fit me properly

I’ve never ridden a bike with a 680mm (26.77in) top tube before and that was the biggest difference for me. Despite initially being intimidated by the gate-like structure, it seemed easier than ever to climb up familiar trail sections and I finished the loop with no pain in my lower back, which I’ve become accustomed to.

Better than that, once the terrain start pointing downwards, it proved itself to be the most stable trail bike I’ve swung a leg over to date. Much like a long-wheelbase rally car, the Foxy can let it all hang out, but in a predictable and satisfying way. You do feel the length around slow uphill corners, though.

As for the not so good things… the DT Swiss rear axle is great, but it locates into an insert that is a press-fit into the frame. It’s not a very tight fit, and if you remove the back wheel a lot, then it’d be very easy to lose.?

The foxy's rear axle design is really annoying for those who regularly have the rear wheel out: the foxy's rear axle design is really annoying for those who regularly have the rear wheel out

I’ve really had to keep an eye on that black alloy cap

My gearing was also all over the place, and was chucking the chain off left, right and centre.

I was ready to bin the front mech and shifter after the first ride, but I shouldn’t have been so hasty. Turns out both the rear derailleur bolt and the mech hanger had worked loose, and after a dash of Loctite and a twist of torque, everything was spot on again. I’ve also made a right mess of the chainstay; big feet, a goofy pedal stance and abrasive trail centre surfaces have added a polished section to my rear chainstay.

Remember people, no matter how excited you are to ride, heli-tape first!

It turns out that my size 12 feet combined with a goofy stance do a pretty good job of polishing a frame.. : it turns out that my size 12 feet combined with a goofy stance do a pretty good job of polishing a frame..

It’s remarkable quite how quickly a bike can look used, here’s why fitting Heli-tape to a new frame is a good idea..

I’m pretty confident that the Foxy is the first bike to actually fit me properly. I can’t wait for longer nights so I can get more time in with it.

  • Costs this month: ?0?
  • Most frequented trail: Cafall, Cwmcarn