chain

David Pruitt steps down as Performance CEO, Pat Cunnane becomes interim president

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (BRAIN) — David Pruitt, a long-time Performance Bicycle employee who helped negotiate the retail chain’s sale to ASI, has stepped down as CEO effective this week. Pat Cunnane, ASI’s CEO, has been named Performance’s interim president.

SRAM claims victories in retail pricing

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (BRAIN) — U.S. visitors to European-based e-commerce sites like Wiggle and Chain Reaction have seen something new when they searched for SRAM products in recent months: nothing

How to replace your worn out bicycle chain

Knowing how to fit a bike chain is an essential skill for any home mechanic. Chains are one of the consumable parts of your drivetrain and will stretch and wear with use, so you will need to replace it sooner or later.

  • Everything you ever wanted to know about cleaning your bike chain
  • Drivetrain wear explained

The steps below are the same whether you ride a mountain bike or a road bike.

How to replace your worn out chain

What you need

  • Chain splitter tool (aka: chain breaker)
  • Chain checker tool
  • Piece of broken spoke
  • Quick link pliers

What to do

There are a few exceptions, but most chains from the major manufacturers are compatible with each other’s drivetrain components. However, you will need to match the speed of your drivetrain with the speed of your chain — for example a 9-speed drivetrain will require a 9-speed chain.

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Using the chain splitter, push one of the pins out of the lower stretch of chain or undo the quick link if one is installed. Once you’ve extracted the pin, carefully remove the chain from the bike.

If you’ve let your chain wear too much, then you may need to replace your cassette at the same time. Read our article on chain wear to learn more.

Shift the rear derailleur into the biggest cog and the front to the biggest chainring. Release the clutch mechanism on your rear derailleur if you have one.

  • How to make a chain holding hook

How to care for your chain

How to measure a chain for wear

Chain tools and wear checkers

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

How to convert your bike to a 1x drivetrain

There is an undeniable appeal to a single chainring set up, provided it suits your riding style and terrain. Ditching one or more chainrings, a front derailleur, a shifter and the associated cables can not only shed close to a pound, but also adds a bit of simplicity to your bike’s cockpit at a time when handlebars are increasingly cluttered with GPS units, dropper post remotes and suspension lockout levers.

  • Buyer’s guide to mountain bike groupsets
  • 5 ways to make your old bike feel new

How to convert your bike to a 1x drivetrain

Ditch the shifty bits

Remove your front shifter, front derailleur and all your geared chain rings. This includes your middle ring (if running a triple). While you can experiment with the chainring you already have, it’s far from optimal for a 1x application as geared chainrings have ramps, pins and tooth profiles that are designed to ease the chain’s transition from one ring to another.

This is great for smooth and fast shifting, but isn’t ideal when you want the chain to stay put.

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Acquire and install non-shifty bits

Chain retention is the key to creating a reliable single-ring drivetrain and your chainring is your first line of defence again dropped chains.

There are dozens of companies who are now producing chainrings with alternating width tooth profiles, similar to SRAM’s X-SYNC technology. These are generally referred to as narrow-wide chainrings.

These chainrings match the width of their teeth to the width of the chain’s inner and outer plates, which greatly reduces any side-to-side movement of the chain, thus reducing the likelihood of dropping it.

  • Mountain bike chainring reviews

Choose a chain guide

  • Chain guide reviews

Resize your chain

  • How to replace a chain

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

7 quick and easy ways to clean your bike to a sparkling shine

Washing your road or mountain bike after riding can be a pain. It’s important to do it regularly though, to keep it in good working order, make components last longer and save you money. Let’s look at how to clean your bike quickly.

Cleaning your bike regularly helps prevent build-up of dirt and grease that would otherwise chew through your moving mechanical parts – especially your drive train. Washing your bike after riding in muddy or wet conditions is even more important. Check out our step-by-step guide below, with video.

  • Buyer’s guide to bike cleaning products
  • Six common beginner repair fails
  • How to replace a bike chain

How to clean your bike quickly

What you’ll need to wash your bike

  • Bucket and sponge or hosepipe
  • Degreaser
  • Bike wash fluid (preferably biodegradable)
  • Brushes
  • Paper cloth
  • Chainlube
  • Chain cleaning device

If you’re in a real hurry following a wet ride, you can just spray your drivetrain with water-displacing lube to purge water from your chain and avoid rustiness before a thorough wash.

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1. Clean the chain

Use a chain cleaning device along with degreaser to remove built up grime, mud and oil from the chain. If you don’t have a chain cleaning tool, aerosol degreaser and a brush will work with a bit of extra effort.

If there’s loads of oily grime on the cassette and jockey wheels, use degreaser and scrub these before continuing.

2. Clean the discs (if you have them)

3. Wet your bike and spray on some bike wash

4. Brush it down

5. Rinse it all off

6. Buff up your bike

7. Lube the chain

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Trail Tech: 5 trailside repairs you need to know

The best medicine is often preventive and the best way to avoid mechanicals on the trail is to ensure your mountain bike is in working order before you hit the singletrack. Despite our best efforts, stuff happens. When it does, you should be prepared to rise to the occasion and save your ride.

I’m not going to give you half-baked advice, such as how to use a tree branch in place of a handlebar if your handlebar snaps, or suggest that you stuff your tyre full of leaves if you get a flat. Instead, these are practical solutions to common mechanicals that you or your riding buddies are likely to encounter

1. Know how to pump properly 

Picture this: you flatted and have just installed a new inner tube. You’re pumping like mad with your hand pump so you can get riding again only to shear off the valve stem. No patch is gonna fix that. So you’d better have a second tube or it could be a long walk home.

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Bad

There is a right and a wrong way to use a hand pump. The wrong way is to rest the wheel against your thigh and pump like crazy. While effective, this puts undue stress on the valve stem, increasing the likelihood of damage.

2. Give sidewall tears the boot

3. Carry the right multi-tool

4. Fix a cleat with your bike’s ‘back-up bolts’

5. Trailside singlespeed conversion

  1. Remove what remains of the rear derailleur by unbolting it from the hanger. Take the rear derailleur cable and loop it around the seatstay so that it won’t get tangled in the drivetrain.
  2. Open the quick-link or remove a pin with your chain tool. (Using the quick-link is generally preferable, but you’re going to be shortening the chain anyway.)
  3. Attempt to find a workable gear combination with the straightest chainline possible. Use the middle chainring on a triple crankset, the small ring on a double, and, well, the only chainring on a 1x drivetrain. Find a gear combination that will work without too much slack in the chain and splice the chain back together.
  4. If you have a full suspension, be aware that most suspension designs have some degree of fore/aft axle movement as the wheel moves through its travel. This means that while your chain might appear reasonably tensioned when you’re hacking things together, the chain will become too loose or too tight as the rear suspension compresses. To counter this, lock out the rear suspension. 
  5. If you have a shock pump handy, inflate the rear suspension to the point that the suspension won’t compress in the open position (but be sure to stay below the shock’s maximum air pressure, which is usually printed on the shock body.) High air pressure plus the lockout will minimize any rear suspension movement that could compromise chain tension.

 

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Trail Tech: 5 trailside repairs you need to know

The best medicine is often preventive and the best way to avoid mechanicals on the trail is to ensure your mountain bike is in working order before you hit the singletrack. Despite our best efforts, stuff happens. When it does, you should be prepared to rise to the occasion and save your ride.

I’m not going to give you half-baked advice, such as how to use a tree branch in place of a handlebar if your handlebar snaps, or suggest that you stuff your tyre full of leaves if you get a flat. Instead, these are practical solutions to common mechanicals that you or your riding buddies are likely to encounter

1. Know how to pump properly 

Picture this: you flatted and have just installed a new inner tube. You’re pumping like mad with your hand pump so you can get riding again only to shear off the valve stem. No patch is gonna fix that. So you’d better have a second tube or it could be a long walk home.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Bad

There is a right and a wrong way to use a hand pump. The wrong way is to rest the wheel against your thigh and pump like crazy. While effective, this puts undue stress on the valve stem, increasing the likelihood of damage.

2. Give sidewall tears the boot

3. Carry the right multi-tool

4. Fix a cleat with your bike’s ‘back-up bolts’

5. Trailside singlespeed conversion

  1. Remove what remains of the rear derailleur by unbolting it from the hanger. Take the rear derailleur cable and loop it around the seatstay so that it won’t get tangled in the drivetrain.
  2. Open the quick-link or remove a pin with your chain tool. (Using the quick-link is generally preferable, but you’re going to be shortening the chain anyway.)
  3. Attempt to find a workable gear combination with the straightest chainline possible. Use the middle chainring on a triple crankset, the small ring on a double, and, well, the only chainring on a 1x drivetrain. Find a gear combination that will work without too much slack in the chain and splice the chain back together.
  4. If you have a full suspension, be aware that most suspension designs have some degree of fore/aft axle movement as the wheel moves through its travel. This means that while your chain might appear reasonably tensioned when you’re hacking things together, the chain will become too loose or too tight as the rear suspension compresses. To counter this, lock out the rear suspension. 
  5. If you have a shock pump handy, inflate the rear suspension to the point that the suspension won’t compress in the open position (but be sure to stay below the shock’s maximum air pressure, which is usually printed on the shock body.) High air pressure plus the lockout will minimize any rear suspension movement that could compromise chain tension.

 

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Pedro’s launches new tools and bike-care products

BOSTON (BRAIN) — Pedro’s North America is releasing several new tools and bike care products for summer, including a new degreaser designed to be friendly to modern chains, and a concentrated version of its Green Fizz bike cleaner. The company also has just released a new public tool station, a wall- or post-mounted tool wrap that contains 13 bike tools with permanent tethering cords.

Home Wrench: Common repair mistakes

Repairing your own bike can be both highly satisfying and a money-saving exercise. However, it’s worth keeping in mind that we all make mistakes – and that when it comes to maintenance these can come at the expense of your safety, damage to your precious ride (we’ll leave you to fight it out over which of those is the more important) or simply limiting its functional potential

This time out on Home Wrench I’ll be outlining some common repair mistakes – knowing of them should hopefully prevent you from making them.  

Many of us replace our own chains – but sizing is critical. Assuming the derailleur cage length is right for your chosen gear setup, you should be able to cross-chain on the big-big combo without huge issues. If you’re derailleur doesn’t allow this, your chain is too short.

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If going to the opposite of small-small, the chain shouldn’t droop on the ground and the derailleur should be under at least some tension.

Of course, generally both of these gear combinations should be avoided when riding, but that’s another debate entirely. And lastly, don’t forget to account for any chain growth if you’re on a full-suspension mountain bike (generally only an issue on older bikes).

Seeing excessive cable housing on bikes is a pet hate of mine. It adds weight, increases friction and looks silly. As with chains though, it’s just as easy to go too short.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Squirt releases Bio-Bike Bike Cleaner

BOULDER, Colo. (BRAIN) — Chain-lube brand Squirt has introduced a biodegradable cleaner designed specifically to work with its lube. Bio-Bike Wash is now available from J&B Importers and QBP