benefits

Wahoo becomes ‘Official Technology Partner’ of Rapha Cycling Club

LONDON (BRAIN) — Wahoo Fitness products will be getting involved with Rapha Cycling Club and its locations around the world. Wahoo’s KICKR stationary trainers will be used at the clubs and its ELEMNT GPS bike computers will be mounted to the Canyon bikes that the club loans to members

Showers Pass baselayer combines bamboo and wool

PORTLAND, Ore. (BRAIN) — Showers Pass has introduced a new short sleeve edition of its Bamboo-Merino Henley shirts, designed for activities including bike riding

Dan Sotelo returns to industry with wheel balancing system

MERCER ISLAND, Wash. (BRAIN) — Dan Sotelo, one of the most prolific innovators during the 1990s mountain bike boom, is returning to the wholesale side of the industry with a new wheel balancing system he is presenting to wheel, tire and bike makers around the world. Sotelo is best known as the founder of Onza , a parts and accessories brand in the 1990s

Over to you: are wider rims marketing hype or a real-world benefit?

In a new regular series for BikeRadar, we want to hear from you, dear reader. We’ll come up with an interesting discussion topic, controversial opinion or maybe one of our own horror stories, and ask you to share your experiences in the comments below. Don’t hold back, tell us what you really think!

  • Buyers guide to road wheels
  • How to choose mountain bike wheels

This week, we want to know your thoughts on the topic of wider rims — marketing hype or real-world benefit?

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We’re being told that wider rims and tyres have a range of positive benefits

We’re being told that wider rims and tyres have a range of positive benefits that include lower rolling resistance and better control. But with ne17mm, 19mm, even 21mm on road wheels and 30mm plus and growing on mountain bikes, the array of new products is dizzying as are the number of articles and discussions around whether these new wider rims can give you the edge. 

So over to you. Are these bigger rim widths a genuine cycling innovation providing speed, stability, traction and other benefits, or are they just another piece of bike industry marketing getting us to spend our hard-earned cash. Have you bought in, or opted out? And what do you think about other new industry standards? Let us know in the comments below…

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Verde to represent IZIP for PR and brand communications

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. (BRAIN) — Verde Brand Communications is now handling PR and brand communications for?IZIP, an Accell North America brand. “E-bikes are becoming increasingly popular with people turning to them for their weekly commutes and weekend adventures,” said Rob Kaplan, vice president of sales at IZIP.

Shimano XT Di2 opens up the electronic-shifting frontier

Shimano’s XTR Di2 group really, really impressed our testers with its performance, but the price is incredibly high. If you’re tempted by the possibilities of an electronically-controlled mountain bike drivetrain but weary of the steep cost of admission, the recently unveiled XT Di2 kit might be the group you’ve been waiting for.

In addition to lowering the price point, Shimano focused on refining ergonomics, improving durability, making the group “smarter” and adding some wireless functionality. If XT Di2 lives up to Shimano’s claims, there will be a lot to like about this group when it becomes available in September.

  • Buyer’s guide to mountain bike groupsets

Deore XT SW-M8050 Firebolt shifters

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The XT-level Di2 shifters have been tweaked from the top-tier XTR version. The size of the rotary shift paddles has been increased slightly, the stroke is slightly shorter, with a single click, and they offer adjustable positioning to suit rider preference.

Shimano’s mountain bike product manager, Matt Robertson, was quick to tout the benefits of electronic shifters over the mechanical versions.

“We can choose exactly the spring rate and lever feel we want. We don’t have to worry about clutch force or cable pull,” Robertson said.

Deore XT Di2 FD-M8070 front derailleur

Deore XT RD-M8050-GS Di2 Shimano Shadow RD+ rear derailleur ?

SC-MT800 system information display

XT Di2 weight comparisons

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Shimano XT Di2 opens up the electronic-shifting frontier

Shimano’s XTR Di2 group really, really impressed our testers with its performance, but the price is incredibly high. If you’re tempted by the possibilities of an electronically-controlled mountain bike drivetrain but weary of the steep cost of admission, the recently unveiled XT Di2 kit might be the group you’ve been waiting for.

In addition to lowering the price point, Shimano focused on refining ergonomics, improving durability, making the group “smarter” and adding some wireless functionality. If XT Di2 lives up to Shimano’s claims, there will be a lot to like about this group when it becomes available in September.

  • Buyer’s guide to mountain bike groupsets

Deore XT SW-M8050 Firebolt shifters

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

The XT-level Di2 shifters have been tweaked from the top-tier XTR version. The size of the rotary shift paddles has been increased slightly, the stroke is slightly shorter, with a single click, and they offer adjustable positioning to suit rider preference.

Shimano’s mountain bike product manager, Matt Robertson, was quick to tout the benefits of electronic shifters over the mechanical versions.

“We can choose exactly the spring rate and lever feel we want. We don’t have to worry about clutch force or cable pull,” Robertson said.

Deore XT Di2 FD-M8070 front derailleur

Deore XT RD-M8050-GS Di2 Shimano Shadow RD+ rear derailleur ?

SC-MT800 system information display

XT Di2 weight comparisons

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Phoenix Electric Bike Expo

Start: January 15, 2016 1:00 am End: January 17, 2016 1:00 am Location: Tempe Diablo Stadium www.electricbike-expo.com/ The Electric Bike Expo, a series of roadshow events where every day cycling enthusiasts can come and learn, test ride and experience the electric bike movement in a fun and controlled setting. “The first time you feel the power added to your pedal and the ability to tackle that incline is when you realize how this will change your love of cycling and take your return to riding to a whole new level.” These events are meant to provide both education and entertainment, or as well call it “Edutainment”, where everyone can learn about the benefits of electric power assist bicycles and the fun you can have tackling your favorite path or trail with new enthusiasm!

Easton announces Heist wide-profile mountain bike wheels

Remember the new Easton ARC wide-format aluminium mountain bike rims we told you about a couple of weeks ago? Easton is now building those same tubeless-ready rims into complete mountain bike wheelsets called Heist. Offered in the same 24, 27, and 30mm internal widths, Heist promises to bring the benefits of wider rims to the masses, thanks to very attainable price points.

  • 20mm depth
  • Welded construction
  • 24mm, 27mm, or 30mm internal widths
  • 32-hole spoke drilling
  • 27.5in or 29in diameters
  • Claimed 27.5in weights: 1,650g (24mm); 1,750 (27mm); 1,790g (30mm)
  • Claimed 29in weights: 1,730g (24mm); 1,840g (27mm); 1,880g (30mm)
  • US$700 / £450 / €650 / AU$TBC
  • July availability

The new Heist wheels bring the benefits of wide rim profiles to more reasonable price points

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Easton is focusing on durability here, building each Heist wheel with conventional straight-pull, double-butted stainless steel spokes and brass nipples in a three-cross pattern. The same spoke length is used throughout, too. Easton is including five spare spokes with each wheelset. For riders who prefer a more subdued look, the black anodized rims’ vinyl decals can be easily removed.

Heist wheels are built around Easton’s new X5 hubset, which uses a straightforward cartridge bearing construction, a conventional three-pawl driver, and six-bolt rotor compatibility. The axles are fairly large with a 15mm diameter out back and 17mm up front, and the bearings are correspondingly big, which bodes well for durability. Interchangeable end caps are included for use with quick-release or thru-axle frames and forks.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Rotor launches crank axle-based power meter, lowers pricing on previous meters

MADRID (BRAIN) — Creating a new category in the power meter market, Rotor Bike Components has introduced the INpower meter, which is integrated into the axles of the Spanish brand’s cranksets.  INpower measures data from the cyclist’s left leg and is available in any 30-millimeter Rotor crank not just for road, but also for mountain, ’cross and triathlon/TT. “We wanted to create a power meter that overcame current trends in power meter technology and could be transferred to other disciplines,” said Pablo Carrasco, head of research and development at Rotor and INpower’s inventor