banshee

Banshee Bikes rolls out dealer-direct program for North America

NEDERLAND, Colo.

Push Industries launches Elevensix shock

Many BikeRadar readers may be familiar with Push Industries as one of the leading mountain bike suspension tuning outfits. Today, the Loveland, Colorado-based company is broadening its offerings with the launch of its first production shock, the Elevensix. This American-made coil shock comes with a hefty US$1,200 price tag, but seeks to back it up through the use of high-end materials, precision manufacturing, and class-leading customer service.

Not just an off-the-shelf shock

Darren Murphy, the founder and owner of Push Industries, wants to make it very clear that the Elevensix isn’t a production shock in the traditional sense; it’s a bespoke unit manufactured by Push.

Customers will follow a process similar to the one Push uses to tune its customers’ Fox and RockShox forks and shocks. The process starts by having a discussion with a Push suspension tuner and letting them know your make, model, rider weight, riding style, the type of terrain you frequently ride and how you generally want your suspension to perform. Using this data, Push will then build an Elevensix specifically for you. Following that, your shock will arrive with contact information for the tuner who built it, should you have any setup questions. 

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“We know this isn’t going be to a shock for everyone,†said Murphy.

To that end, Push doesn’t plan to attempt to design the Elevensix to fit every make and model out there, but rather, to target popular models in the 140-160mm category.

Push currently offers the Elevensix shock for the Santa Cruz Nomad and Bronson, the Yeti SB66 and SB6, the Niner WFO 9, the Pivot Mach 6, and the Ibis Mojo HD. Other bikes are currently in the pipeline, including the Banshee Rune and Specialized Enduro 29.

Elevensix specifics

Why use a coil?

Details make all the difference

Availability

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Carrera Banshee X review

The jewel in the Carrera crown in recent years has been the Fury hardtail. The Banshee X is a similar sort of budget hard-hitter, the higher-specced of two 140mm travel full suspension bikes. What is unusual about it, given its price, is that it’s not screamingly heavy.

While it’s not a trail whale, the Banshee X is not really a do-it-all machine like a pricier trail bike would be. It’s hard work on climbs and pedally trails. But if technical descents are the raison d’être of your rides and you’ve got £800, it’s well worth considering.

Ride & handling: A play bike that offers stick-to-the-trail confidence

The words ‘trail extreme geometry’ appear on the frame. It’s not extreme. It’s not even slack. The Banshee X is, however, set up like a trail bike. Its wide bar, short stem, and weight-back stance provide the tightly controlled steering and non-precipitous riding position you want for riding downwards. The suspension is very capable for an £800 bike. An extra 20 or 40mm of controlled travel over most bikes at this price gives you the confidence and ability to hit stuff faster. The fork doesn’t really flex or flounder, and the rear shock doesn’t simply fire back at you. It’s only a shame that the braking is a bit wooden. What it’s not so good at is climbing. It’s not so much heavy as inert. Even on flatter singletrack, it’s a struggle to wind up the pace. So it’s not a bike for big days out.

Frame: Four-bar suspension

The main triangle is built from chunky tubes. It’s braced where the seat tube meets the top tube and reinforced with a gusset at the down tube/head tube joint. This isn’t a freeride bike, though it may well be pressed into service as such by spade-wielding teens in their local woods so any extra strength is welcome. The SR Suntour Epicon air fork is a good price/ performance compromise. Since it’s an easily adjustable air spring, you can take advantage of most of its 140mm travel even if you’re lean. It has a hydraulic lockout lever and rebound adjustment. While the steerer isn’t tapered, Suntour’s 15mm QLoc axle adds stiffness at the fork tips and makes accidental wheel ejection impossible.

The aluminium frame features a genuine four-bar rear end, which neither overreacts to pedalling input nor fails to react properly during braking. The pivots have sealed cartridge bearings rather than bushes and the shock is an adjustable Epicon one. It is rebound adjustable too but it doesn’t match the fork’s performance. There’s noticeable stiction – though it’s less obvious the softer you run the shock. A lockout lever lets you get away with a softer feel (and more sag) by killing pedal bob on climbs, though the locked-out shock tops out with a clunk over bumps.

Equipment: Specced for gravity asisted fun

The 680mm handlebar gives you plenty of steering leverage. Tyres are Continental Mountain Kings in a 2.2in width. It’s a shame they’re not 2.4in, which would fit. The 2.4s are only 60g per tyre heavier and the extra air space would be welcome on rough descents. Gearing is 27-speed SRAM X5, with a bottom sprocket of 32T. Given the 14.25kg (31.4lb) weight, a 34 would have been preferable. One obvious cost saving is the bottom bracket (BB): a Truvativ Powerspline internal one instead of, say, an external bearing GXP, which would stand up better to the drops and hard-riding the Banshee X will inevitably endure. If you kill the bottom bracket quickly, bite the bullet and upgrade it.

This article was originally published in What Mountain Bike



Carrera Banshee X review

The jewel in the Carrera crown in recent years has been the Fury hardtail. The Banshee X is a similar sort of budget hard-hitter, the higher-specced of two 140mm travel full suspension bikes. What is unusual about it, given its price, is that it’s not screamingly heavy.

While it’s not a trail whale, the Banshee X is not really a do-it-all machine like a pricier trail bike would be. It’s hard work on climbs and pedally trails. But if technical descents are the raison d’être of your rides and you’ve got £800, it’s well worth considering.

Ride & handling: A play bike that offers stick-to-the-trail confidence

The words ‘trail extreme geometry’ appear on the frame. It’s not extreme. It’s not even slack. The Banshee X is, however, set up like a trail bike. Its wide bar, short stem, and weight-back stance provide the tightly controlled steering and non-precipitous riding position you want for riding downwards. The suspension is very capable for an £800 bike. An extra 20 or 40mm of controlled travel over most bikes at this price gives you the confidence and ability to hit stuff faster. The fork doesn’t really flex or flounder, and the rear shock doesn’t simply fire back at you. It’s only a shame that the braking is a bit wooden. What it’s not so good at is climbing. It’s not so much heavy as inert. Even on flatter singletrack, it’s a struggle to wind up the pace. So it’s not a bike for big days out.

Frame: Four-bar suspension

The main triangle is built from chunky tubes. It’s braced where the seat tube meets the top tube and reinforced with a gusset at the down tube/head tube joint. This isn’t a freeride bike, though it may well be pressed into service as such by spade-wielding teens in their local woods so any extra strength is welcome. The SR Suntour Epicon air fork is a good price/ performance compromise. Since it’s an easily adjustable air spring, you can take advantage of most of its 140mm travel even if you’re lean. It has a hydraulic lockout lever and rebound adjustment. While the steerer isn’t tapered, Suntour’s 15mm QLoc axle adds stiffness at the fork tips and makes accidental wheel ejection impossible.

The aluminium frame features a genuine four-bar rear end, which neither overreacts to pedalling input nor fails to react properly during braking. The pivots have sealed cartridge bearings rather than bushes and the shock is an adjustable Epicon one. It is rebound adjustable too but it doesn’t match the fork’s performance. There’s noticeable stiction – though it’s less obvious the softer you run the shock. A lockout lever lets you get away with a softer feel (and more sag) by killing pedal bob on climbs, though the locked-out shock tops out with a clunk over bumps.

Equipment: Specced for gravity asisted fun

The 680mm handlebar gives you plenty of steering leverage. Tyres are Continental Mountain Kings in a 2.2in width. It’s a shame they’re not 2.4in, which would fit. The 2.4s are only 60g per tyre heavier and the extra air space would be welcome on rough descents. Gearing is 27-speed SRAM X5, with a bottom sprocket of 32T. Given the 14.25kg (31.4lb) weight, a 34 would have been preferable. One obvious cost saving is the bottom bracket (BB): a Truvativ Powerspline internal one instead of, say, an external bearing GXP, which would stand up better to the drops and hard-riding the Banshee X will inevitably endure. If you kill the bottom bracket quickly, bite the bullet and upgrade it.

This article was originally published in What Mountain Bike