Fashion

Boston City Summer Bike Program

From the email:

CELEBRATE BIKE TO WORK DAY WITH MAYOR WALSH AND BLUE BIKES!

Register now for Boston’s National Bike to Work Day Festival on Friday May 18, the City’s annual celebration of bicycling hosted by the Boston Transportation Department!

This year, Mayor Walsh will be joined by Andrew Dreyfus, the President and CEO of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, to celebrate the rebranding of our public bike share system as Blue Bikes. The new brand recognizes Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts as the new title sponsor of the publicly-owned system, which we’re expanding this year.

You can join one of a dozen bike convoys at stops all across the Boston area or ride over on your own. When you arrive at City Hall Plaza, you’ll be greeted by bike-friendly exhibitors and free breakfast provided by Clif Bar, High Brew Coffee, Iggy’s Bread of the World, and Whole Foods – Charles River Plaza. You must pre-register for the event in order to be eligible to receive a limited edition 2018 Bike to Work Day shirt. Shirts will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. Blue Bikes members can receive Blue Bikes sunglasses. Registration, a map of the convoys, and other event details can be found at boston.gov/bike-to-work-day.

People who identify as female or gender non-conforming practice bike skills in a parking lot.

LEARN TO RIDE AT A WOMEN’S LEARN-TO-RIDE CLINIC

Are you a Boston resident who identifies as female or gender-nonconforming? Do you want to learn to ride a bike or sharpen existing bike skills? If so, you’re invited to participate in the Boston Transportation Department’s free clinics. The “Basic Skills” clinics are for you if you’ve never ridden a bike before, haven’t been on a bike for years, or can ride a little but need to build basic skills like starting, stopping, turning, and hand signaling. “Intro to Street Skills” clinics are for you if you have the basics down, but want to build your confidence riding on the street. Pre-registration is required for all clinics. Bikes and helmets are provided upon request. Find more information at boston.gov/women-bike.

Schedule of planned events:

  • Basic Skills | Tuesday, June 19, 6 pm – 8 pm, Mattapan
  • Basic Skills | Wednesday, July 11, 6 pm – 8 pm, Roxbury
  • Basic Skills | Wednesday, July 25, 6 pm – 8 pm, Charlestown
  • Basic Skills | Wednesday, August 8, 6 pm – 8 pm, Allston
  • Basic Skills | Saturday, September 8, 10 am – 12 pm, Dorchester
  • Intro to Street Skills | Saturday, September 8, 12 pm – 2 pm, Dorchester
  • Basic Skills | Saturday, September 29, 10 am – 12 pm, Roxbury
  • Intro to Street Skills | Saturday, September 29, 12 pm – 2 pm, Roxbury
  • Basic Skills | Saturday, October 13, 10 am – 12 pm, East Boston
  • Intro to Street Skills | Saturday, October 13, 12 pm – 2 pm, East Boston
Two people presenting as females ride bike share bikes on a street in Boston. They are smiling and appear to be having fun.

LEARN ABOUT BIKE SHARE AT A BOSTON BY BIKE(SHARE) RIDE

Are you a resident of Boston who is interested in the region’s public bike share system but haven’t yet tried it out? Join one of four Boston by Bike(share) events hosted by the Boston Transportation Department this year. These events are a great way to try bike share for free and learn more about the different membership options available. An experienced ride leader will take you on a group bike ride through the neighborhood, traveling along comfortable on- and off-street routes. Helmets will be provided and participants should be a minimum of 16 years old. Information about our Boston by Bike(share) events can be found at boston.gov/bikes.

  • East Boston by Bike(share) | Wednesday, June 27, 6 pm – 8 pm
  • South Boston by Bike(share) | Wednesday, July 18, 6 pm – 8 pm
  • Dorchester by Bike(share) | Wednesday, August 22, 6 pm – 8 pm
  • Roxbury and South End by Bike(share) | Wednesday, September 19, 6 pm – 8 pm
Two people presenting as female ride bikes along the Staniford St cycletrack.

RIDE CONNECT HISTORIC BOSTON WITH US

Connect Historic Boston (CHB) is an initiative between the City of Boston and the National Park Service to link historic sites through downtown Boston. While construction on the full project continues, the Boston Transportation Department will be able to take people on a ride of the substantially-complete bike trail.

Meet us on June 22 at 5:30 pm at South Station. We’ll ride along the CHB Trail, and make a few stops along the way to discuss the project. The ride will take approximately one hour and will end near a Red Line T stop.

Don’t have a bike? A limited number of Blue Bikes (formerly known as Hubway) will be available. Please be sure to register if you want to ride a Blue Bike. Registration is optional for riders who have their own bikes, but does help us in planning. All riders will need to sign a waiver. Helmets will be required.

Boston City Councilors Support Protected Lanes on Longfellow

From U-Hub:

City Councilors Michelle Wu (at large) and Josh Zakim (Beacon Hill, Back Bay, Fenway, Mission Hill) will ask other councilors to join them tomorrow in urging the state to use barriers to protect bicyclists when the revamped Longfellow Bridge finally opens later this month.

At the regular council meeting, the two will formally ask other councilors to agree to a resolution calling on MassDOT to take one of the vehicle lanes on the inbound side and convert it to bicycle use, with something separating the cars and trucks from the bicyclists.

In their formal request, the two say the traffic disaster predicted when the state began shutting parts of the bridge five years ago never materialized, and that more people now commute by bicycle than when construction began. Also:

The incline on the first half of the inbound side of the bridge makes it particularly challenging to accommodate cyclists of varying abilities without a lane wide enough to facilitate passing.

Today Is The Day: Porter For People Rally At 5:30pm!

From the email:

Today is the day. We are rallying in Porter Square to say two deaths in one square is too many, that these and other road fatalities were preventable with better infrastructure, and that we want #SafeStreetsNow. We want life-saving improvements to the current redesign of Porter Square and greater action to build out a city-wide protected network within 5 years.

Join us for an evening of action in the heart of one of Cambridge’s busiest intersections. The Second Line Social Aid and Pleasure Society Brass Band will be playing, and we will hear stories from a number of community members impacted by poor infrastructure. We will end with a massive people-protected bike lane on Somerville Ave and Mass Ave in a show of solidarity for vulnerable road users.

RSVP on Facebook

Details:
5:30 PM: Gather (mingling, kid’s crafts, displays, music)
6:00 PM: Rally begins
6:30 PM: People-protected bike lanes begin

Together, let’s make Porter Square a square for people.

Sea Otter 2018: Brands return after absence; e-MTBs make their mark

MONTEREY, Calif. (BRAIN) — The Sea Otter Classic opened Thursday with an expo that includes more than 500 booths representing nearly 900 brands and covering 165,000 square feet of space at Laguna Seca Raceway

Bike Expo New York moves to new venue

NEW YORK (BRAIN) — Less than a month before the event, Bike New York has announced that it will move Bike Expo New York to Pier 12 in Brooklyn. Due to unexpected maintenance, the nonprofit was unable to obtain a permit to hold the event at Basketball City, where the event has taken place for the last six years. The event is May 4-5

Do You Want Protected Bike Lanes On The Longfellow?

From Cambridge Bike Safety:

The Longfellow Bridge, a critical bike connector to Boston, is going to be restriped and reopened in May. You may be surprised to learn that in the final design, the inbound bike lane will be similar or worse than it is today: it will continue to have a dangerous 5 1/2-foot painted bike lane between fast-moving cars and trucks on one side, and the storm grates and detritus that builds up next to the crash barrier on the other side. The outbound lane will be slightly better, with a small 2-foot buffer separating bikes from one lane of car traffic with no protection.

According to Boston’s bike counts, one-third of AM rush hour commuters are on bicycles. Those families, commuters and visitors deserve a safe space to ride! We have been working to convince state officials to install pilot protected bike lanes by restriping both lanes, inbound and outbound, with buffers and flexposts to provide separation and permanent protection for the commuters, families, and other people traveling over this bridge on bikes.

To make this vision a reality we need to keep the pressure on state officials. Please take these two actions today to ensure help us transform the Longfellow Bridge from a highway to a safe, mulit-modal connector for everyone, including those walking and bicycling!

  1. Call or email your state representative’s and senator’s offices (look yours up here or find the list of Cambridge reps below) as soon as possible and tell them how important it is to you as a constituent that MassDOT update the design to include safe, protected bike lanes on the bridge in both directions. Please copy us or email us afterward (info@cambridgebikesafety.org and info@bostoncyclistsunion.org) so we can keep a count. Talking points are below.

  2. Sign this petition asking state officials to stripe a safe bike lane with a buffer on the inbound side of the Longfellow. If you’ve already signed, share the link with your friends by email or Facebook.

Background:

A group of advocates led by the Boston Cyclists Union, Cambridge Bicycle Safety, and others has been working to convince state officials to change their plans for the inbound side of the bridge, and use painted buffers and flexposts to provide separation and permanent protection for the commuters, families, and other people traveling over this bridge on bikes.

Specifically, we are asking MassDOT to keep the bridge to one travel lane inbound for cars, in order to install an inbound protected bike lane that would allow cyclists to cross the bridge safely.

  • With only one general travel lane, the protected bike lane can be designed to be quite wide, which will have two ancillary benefits: (1) emergency vehicles like ambulances will be able to safely use the bike lane/buffer when needed (with bicyclists pulling over to the side), (2) bicyclists will be able to safely ride side by side and pass each other on the steep climb up the bridge.

  • We know that one lane is all that’s needed, given that there’s only been one car lane over the past 5+ years of construction, and the traffic implosion that had been predicted never materialized. Also, designating only one travel lane for motor vehicles will reduce speeding.

  • Due to these benefits, the Cambridge City Council officially endorsed this proposed design, and two of our state representatives, Mike Connolly and Jay Livingstone, have publicly written to MassDOT asking them to improve safety by adopting this design. (It’s still important to call Mike and Jay to thank them, so they know this is something people really care about.)

  • Also important to note: the change we are asking for can easily be made, even at this late stage. It primarily involves simply painting different lane markings on the bridge, and does not need to delay the project.

For more information, see the Boston Cyclists Union’s post on the history of the Longfellow bridge project. MassDOT’s currently planned design is using data on mode shares from 9 years ago. In that time, Cambridge bike counts have doubled, and the Longfellow bridge has operated with one vehicular inbound travel lane for 5 years without incident. The bridge must be updated to reflect current trends and emphasize safe, healthy mobility with protected bike lanes in both directions.

Be sure to include Longfellow Bridge in the subject, and if possible add a personal story why this is essential for your safe commute and enjoyment of public spaces.

Sincerely,
The CBS Core Team

Write or call your statehouse legislators using the email addresses and phone numbers below. If you don’t know who they are, visit: https://malegislature.gov/Search/FindMyLegislator

Be sure to include Longfellow Bridge in the subject, copy us (info@cambridgebikesafety.org and info@bostoncyclistsunion.org), and if possible add a personal story why this is essential for your safe commute and enjoyment of public spaces.

House

Rep. Dave Rogers (24th Middlesex)
617-722-2370        Dave.Rogers@mahouse.gov

Rep. Marjorie Decker (25th Middlesex)
617-722-2692        Marjorie.Decker@mahouse.gov

Rep. Mike Connolly (26th Middlesex)
617-722-2060        Mike.Connolly@mahouse.gov

Rep. Jonathan Hecht (29th Middlesex)
617-722-2140        Jonathan.Hecht@mahouse.gov

Rep. Jay Livingstone (8th Suffolk)
617-722-2013        Jay.Livingstone@mahouse.gov

Rep. Denise Provost (27th Middlesex, Somerville)
617-722-2263        Denise.Provost@mahouse.gov

Senate

Sen. Patricia Jehlen (2nd Middlesex)
617-722-1578        Patricia.Jehlen@masenate.gov

Sen. Sal DiDomenico (Middlesex and Suffolk)
617-722-1650        Sal.DiDomenico@masenate.gov

Sen. Joseph Boncore (1st Suffolk and Middlesex)
617-722-1634        Joseph.Boncore@masenate.gov

Police Seek Driver Who Struck Cyclist In Hit And Run

Cambridge police are asking for the public’s help in finding a driver who allegedly struck a 14-year-old boy on the morning of March 15 and fled the scene.

A silver Toyota Prius struck the boy around 7:22 a.m. that morning as the boy was biking near the corner of Western Avenue and Putnam Avenue, police said in a Facebook post.

“The driver of the vehicle of interest fled the area and returned approximately three minutes later at approximately 7:25 a.m,” police wrote.

The 14-year-old survived the crash and is recovering from non-life threatening injuries, police said.

The model year of the car is believed to be between 2004 and 2009, according to police.

Cambridge police are asking anyone with information to contact Officer Christopher Sullivan in the Cambridge Police Traffic Enforcement Unit at (617) 349-3307 or email PDTrafficSupervisors@cambridgepolice.org. (via)

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Police are searching for the driver of a Toyota Prius who they believe hit a teenager riding his bike and then fled.

The 14-year-old was riding on Putnam Avenue when he was hit around 7:22 a.m. on Thursday, March 15, according to police.

“I was crossing the street to go on the sidewalk and the car just came out of nowhere and hit the back of my bike and it sent me flying,” he said. (via)

Washington to impose tariffs on $60 billion of Chinese imports — no word yet if bikes will be included

WASHINTON, D.C.

Hubway Is Dead Long Live Blue Bikes

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts will pay nearly $20 million to turn the Boston area’s Hubway bike share system into Blue Bikes and expand the program with more than 1,000 new bikes and more than 100 new rental stations across the region.

“Blue Cross is committed to helping Massachusetts residents lead healthy lives, and this program is a way to bring that to life,” said Jeff Bellows, vice-president of corporate citizenship for BCBS. “Being a health-care company, it’s in line with what we want to do.”

BCBS will pay $18 million over six years to be the sole sponsor of the bike share system, which will be renamed Blue Bikes. The money will be used in part to fund a nearly 50 percent increase in bikes — by the end of 2019, there will be 3,000 Blue Bikes on the streets, up from 1,800 today — and add more than 100 new stations across Boston, Cambridge, Brookline and Somerville. The expansion will bring more service to underserved parts of the city, Bellows said.

“Communities like Mattapan, Dorchester, Roxbury, they’re going to get additional access to these bikes,” he said. (via)

While I wish it was more of a public system, maybe tax based, but sure I will siphon off some of the obscene profits BCBS is making to fund bike share programs.

The best part of this is that Hubway/Blue Bikes will continue, and it will expand into areas that have not been served by it so far.

Hubway Winter Update

From Hubway:

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Hubway had a winning January!

This past month, Hubway riders took over 40,000 trips, more than double the January record. Want to try out winter riding? You don’t need to be tough — you just need to be cold-weather ready. Check out our helpful winter riding tips before hitting the road, and get ready to set more champion numbers in February!

Winter Operations Update

The Airport T Stop station and the Harvard Kennedy School at Bennett St / Eliot St station have been relocated due to snow removal management. Details

We hope the groundhog predicts an early spring, but until then, stay up to date on winter operations. Use the Hubway app to verify the location and availability of your intended station before your trip.

Rider Exclusive: Save 20% on Adam Trent Tickets

Get your discounted tickets now to The Magic of Adam Trent at Shubert Theatre March 9th-11th. Produced by the creative team behind The Illusionists, the world’s best-selling touring magic show, The Magic of Adam Trent is an immersive entertainment extravaganza of magic, comedy, and music designed to entertain the entire family.

Where to Ride

Frog Pond College Night
Tuesdays, 6pm-9pm | Boston


Boston Winter: City Hall Skating Path
February 11am-11pm | Boston

Free Thursdays at the ICA
Thurs, 2/1, 5pm-9pm | Boston

SOWA First Friday 
Fri, 2/2, 5pm-9pm | Boston


Somerville Winter Farmers Market 
Sat, 2/3, 9:30am-2pm | Somerville 


Book Sale at the BPL
Sat, 2/3, 10am-4pm | Boston


Bicycle Maintenance Basics: Free City of Cambridge Workshop
Mon, 2/5, 6pm-7:30pm | Cambridge


Beyond Bicycle Maintenance Basics: Free City of Cambridge Workshop
Wed, 2/7, 6pm-7:30pm | Cambridge


Winter Biker Breakfast
Fri, 2/9, 7:30am-9am | Cambridge


Free! Winter Bike Clinic
Sat, 2/10, 1pm-2:30pm | Boston


Winter Wellness Walks 
Sun, 2/11, 1pm-1:45pm | Boston