Liv launches largest ambassador program in brand’s history

NEWBURY PARK, Calif. (BRAIN) —?Liv’s 2016 U.S.-based ambassador program will include a total of 125 ambassadors located across the country, 45 more than last year

Ogden Fat Bike Summit registration opens

OGDEN, Utah?(BRAIN) — Quality Bicycle Products has announced that the registration link for the Ogden Regional Fat Bike Summit is now open.

E-Thirteen sponsors downhill star Arron Gwin and YT Mob team

PETALUMA, Calif. (BRAIN) — E-Thirteen is now sponsoring American pro downhill racer Aaron Gwin and the YT Mob team, which is title-sponsored by YT Industries, a Germany-based consumer-direct bike brand. The team also includes young Spanish star? Angel Suarez.

Complete guide to winter mountain biking, part 1

Winter’s here and the trails have turned from grippy hardpack to slippery mud. Roots and rocks slime up and dips ?ll with water, sludge and hidden rocks. 

Believe it or not, this is the perfect time of year to tune up your riding skills. The other solution – packing your bike into the shed until summer returns – will leave you missing out on miles of fun and the best-ever chance to hone your bike handling prowess.

Related: Beginner mountain bike setup and maintenance tips

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We’ll look at the main challenges that face the winter mountain biker, and give you solid advice on how to step up your skills to match the conditions. It’s also about getting real thrills out of the new ways you can ride and slide.

The most challenging problem is the lack of traction caused by so much water being around. If you work through the advice here and master your trails when they’re slippery, by next summer you’ll be able to hit new speeds, pushing your bike and yourself even harder.

Singletrack situations

The narrow twists and turns of a singletrack trail can throw rider and bike into all kinds of situations with almost no warning. You have limited line choice and can’t avoid mud, wet roots or rocks, so you need to have bike, body and brain set-up and ready.

Recap

Dealing with descents

Roots, bloody roots

Smooth cornering

Recap

Clearing puddles

Climb like a goat

Thick mud

Water crossings

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Complete guide to winter mountain biking, part 1

Winter’s here and the trails have turned from grippy hardpack to slippery mud. Roots and rocks slime up and dips ?ll with water, sludge and hidden rocks. 

Believe it or not, this is the perfect time of year to tune up your riding skills. The other solution – packing your bike into the shed until summer returns – will leave you missing out on miles of fun and the best-ever chance to hone your bike handling prowess.

Related: Beginner mountain bike setup and maintenance tips

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

We’ll look at the main challenges that face the winter mountain biker, and give you solid advice on how to step up your skills to match the conditions. It’s also about getting real thrills out of the new ways you can ride and slide.

The most challenging problem is the lack of traction caused by so much water being around. If you work through the advice here and master your trails when they’re slippery, by next summer you’ll be able to hit new speeds, pushing your bike and yourself even harder.

Singletrack situations

The narrow twists and turns of a singletrack trail can throw rider and bike into all kinds of situations with almost no warning. You have limited line choice and can’t avoid mud, wet roots or rocks, so you need to have bike, body and brain set-up and ready.

Recap

Dealing with descents

Roots, bloody roots

Smooth cornering

Recap

Clearing puddles

Climb like a goat

Thick mud

Water crossings

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Mayo and Boldry join PeopleForBikes staff

BOULDER, Colo. (BRAIN) —?PeopleForBikes has hired two senior staffers at its Colorado headquarters team. Wendy Mayo, formerly with Clif Bar & Company, is PFB’s new director of marketing & communications

Mayo and Boldry join PeopleForBikes staff

BOULDER, Colo. (BRAIN) —?PeopleForBikes has hired two senior staffers at its Colorado headquarters team

VeloPress releases new edition of Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance

BOULDER, Colo. (BRAIN) — The fifth edition of? Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance includes?step-by-step instructions for servicing vintage components as well as the newest shifting, braking, cyclocross, forks, and bottom bracket systems. The book is now available in bookstores, bike shops, and online.

VeloPress releases new edition of Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance

BOULDER, Colo. (BRAIN) — The fifth edition of? Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance includes?step-by-step instructions for servicing vintage components as well as the newest shifting, braking, cyclocross, forks, and bottom bracket systems. The book is now available in bookstores, bike shops, and online.

8 things we learned from our visit to Shimano

BikeRadar was recently part of a European press pack invited out for a look inside Shimano’s factories in Japan, Singapore and Malaysia. 

We’ll be reporting on the insides of these tech temples in due course but, with the plant visits done, we had the chance to sit down and grill some of the component king’s road and mountain bike product managers. 

Their technique under questioning indicates that, should they ever get the boot from their day jobs, they may have promising second careers as politicians. Here’s what we managed to chisel out of them.

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Related: 2017 road groupset rumours from Shimano, SRAM, Campagnolo and more

1. Wireless shifting? Hold your horses…

Of course, one of the big questions on people’s lips was whether Shimano will be following SRAM down the wireless groupset route following 2015’s mega-launch of SRAM’s Red eTap system. 

2. Power meter possibilities

3. The Di2 trickle down to 105. It’s slow-moving

4. No immediate plans for 12spd

5. The future is rider-shaped

6. Women-specific components are ‘a dream’

7. Enduro groupset ‘under investigation’

8. ‘Four major launches’ for 2016

You can read more at BikeRadar.com