Kegel, Perry and others to speak at Canadian retailer group summit

VANCOUVER, British Columbia (BRAIN) — Milwaukee-area retailer Chris Kegel, Specialized Donny Perry and e-bike expert Ed Benjamin are among the speakers at the first Leadership Summit held by the Canadian Independent Bicycle Retailers’ Association. CIBRA ( formerly called the Bicycle Trade Association of Canada ) will host the event in Vancouver Oct. 26-28

Superstar Proline Tool Kit review

Direct-seller Superstar is known for very strong value, and this Proline kit is a good example. The 16 tools inside the box are sturdy and functional, if not flashy.

The long, ball-ended Allen keys are crisply made. Their sizes run from 2mm to 10mm, and they have their own fiddly holder inside the case. Other obvious elements include a pedal spanner, a chain breaker, pressed-steel cone spanners and spoke keys in three sizes – including Mavic.

There’s a three-pronged Torx key, though the big T40 arm is of little use – a T30, T25 and a smaller one, such as the T10 that’s often found on brakes, would have been better. While the two screwdrivers (one flat, one cross-head) are decent, they are arguably taking up room that more specialist tools could occupy. The same can be said of the tyre levers. This criticism is true of many tool kits though, not just the Superstar Proline.

The superstar proline tool kit contains 16 sturdy tools:

The Superstar Proline tool kit contains 16 sturdy tools

The inclusion of? chainring bolt tool is a nice little touch, as is providing two sturdy handles that fit six different heads (chain whip, cassette tool, pedal spanner, bottom bracket wrench, crank puller and ISIS bottom bracket wrench). They save a lot of space and attach rapidly with sprung-bearing secured pins – you even get two spares.

The plastic case is chunky and holds the tools firmly, though you do have to dismantle the bigger stuff to get it back in, obviously. It’s not a big kit, but it’s a damn good start.

This article was originally published in What Mountain Bike magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

Note: the Superstar Proline tool kit is not distributed in the US or Australia, but Superstar can ship overseas.








#readersrides week three

Fancy getting your bike into one of our galleries for tens of thousands of bike fans to see? Every week at?BikeRadar?we’ll be giving 10 lucky individuals that opportunity.

Every Friday we’ll be requesting pictures of your bike via our?Twitter page. Then, we’ll select 10 of the submitted pictures to feature in a gallery for all to see.?

This week’s readers’ rides

Here’s Martin’s Norco Sight trail bike, complete with a stunning backdrop.

Martin's norco: martin's norco

Luis Alcantarilla fired across this pic of his Di2-equipped Scott Foil.

Luis alcantarilla's scott-foil: luis alcantarilla's scott-foil

Martin McNaught fitted these mudguards to his beloved Pinarello this morning.

Martin mcnaught's pinarello: martin mcnaught's pinarello

Tim proudly presented his classic Dawes Galaxy, complete with Dura-Ace 7800/

Tim schofield's dawes: tim schofield's dawes

Patrick’s Canyon Ultimate CF SL 9.0 is a good-looking machine.

Patrick-Murphy's canyon-cf-ultimate: patrick-murphy's canyon-cf-ultimate

Stuart Doyle’s Cannondale is sitting pretty.

Stuart-Doyle's cannondale: stuart-doyle's cannondale

Alastair Hadfield’s trusty Spesh was photographed after an interval session at Regents Park, London.?

Alastair hadfield's specialized: alastair hadfield's specialized

Our Canadian follower Brody Isaak sent this crisp autumn shot of his Cervelo.

Brody isaak's cervelo-r3: brody isaak's cervelo-r3

Mountain Bike Deals submitted this post cleaning snap of its lovely Stanton hardtail.

Mountain-Bike-Deals' stanton: mountain-bike-deals' stanton

Laurens Van Vissen’s De Rosa Merak at the foot of the Fausto Coppi memorial.

Laurens-van-Wissen's de-rosa: laurens-van-wissen's de-rosa

Want to get your ride featured? To get involved, simply tweet a picture of your bike to the?BikeRadar?Twitter page?next Friday and be sure to add the hashtag #readersrides. You must own the copyright of the images, or have permission from the person who does. Photos will only be used for?BikeRadar?Readers’ Rides. We do not offer payment for the use of photos in this circumstance.








Where should e-bikes be allowed?

Choices A. Roads and adjacent bike lanes B: A, plus protected bike lanes and paved multi-use bike paths C: B, plus gravel paths and rail-trails D: C, plus multi-track natural-surface trails and fire roads E: Anywhere that unassisted bikes are allowed A.

Keepin’ it weird in Austin

The bike market in Austin has many similarities to Portland”s. Slideshow Image:? URL:? http://www.bicycleretailer.com/retail-news/2014/10/22/dealer-tour-austin-retailers-seek-niches-increasingly-saturated-market

Polar Loop fitness tracker review

The Polar Loop is one of the most stylish ‘fit bands’ available, but only really works for biking when you add a compatible heart rate monitor.

The Loop’s a particularly stylish version with a ‘hidden’ calorie, activity level and clock display that triggers when you brush the touch sensitive button. The stainless steel clasp on the bracelet is secure but light enough for mountain biking, but because it needs trimming to length it works best for a single user. It’s waterproof thanks to a sealed magnetic dock for the USB cable link. It syncs with the free – and equally easy to use – Polar Flow app for smartphones or tablets.

The downside is that the step/shock-based data is so approximate it’s only useful in the broadest sense. The daily activity tracker is good for spotting when you’ve been sitting at the computer too long without moving (you can even set an alert) but it’s very much designed around walking/running. That meant we genuinely had bigger activity spikes from walking the dog than from three hours of flat-out mountain biking. Even a lengthy bout of washing up was hard to distinguish from a short hill sprint interval session.

This all changes if you pair it with Polar’s excellent H6 or H7 heart rate belts, which give you a proper indication of how hard you’re working and add that to the scrollable and downloadable data. That also gives you enough data to use the excellent free www.polarpersonaltrainer.com site, which is great for mapping progress and even automatically tracks current training load so you can judge how hard, and when to train next. Once you add the strap overall price compares with full-on HRM and strap setups that are much more comprehensive in terms of data collection (you could get a GPS at this price) and are easier to use on the bike.

This article was originally published in What Mountain Bike magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.








Niterider Pro 3600 Enduro bike light review

As you’d expect from six LEDs pumping out 3600 lumens, the beam of Niterider’s Pro 3600 Enduro is hugely powerful, with full wider-than-the-bar-ends peripheral coverage and consistent brightness further down the trail. There is a slight halo and less close-in light compared with some big hitters, but that’s only noticeable in beam shots rather than on the trail.

The single button toggles between three single lamp settings and then the full double lamp punch with small pinprick light indicators above each lens so you know what’s running. The head is slightly hooded to avoid upwards glare, and there’s a four-LED battery status bar on the head unit. It’s a good job though, because the Pro burns through run time surprisingly fast considering the large and potentially awkward to fit hard case battery.

The big multi-angle adjustable bar and helmet mounts are overkill. The latest Pro series lights seem to have ironed out previous charging issues and recent Niteriders have been reliable. They’re expensive and heavy compared with similarly powered competition, and the half power Pro Race is more than enough for most riders.

This article was originally published in What Mountain Bike magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.








Niterider Pro 3600 Enduro bike light review

As you’d expect from six LEDs pumping out 3600 lumens, the beam of Niterider’s Pro 3600 Enduro is hugely powerful, with full wider-than-the-bar-ends peripheral coverage and consistent brightness further down the trail. There is a slight halo and less close-in light compared with some big hitters, but that’s only noticeable in beam shots rather than on the trail.

The single button toggles between three single lamp settings and then the full double lamp punch with small pinprick light indicators above each lens so you know what’s running. The head is slightly hooded to avoid upwards glare, and there’s a four-LED battery status bar on the head unit. It’s a good job though, because the Pro burns through run time surprisingly fast considering the large and potentially awkward to fit hard case battery.

The big multi-angle adjustable bar and helmet mounts are overkill. The latest Pro series lights seem to have ironed out previous charging issues and recent Niteriders have been reliable. They’re expensive and heavy compared with similarly powered competition, and the half power Pro Race is more than enough for most riders.

This article was originally published in What Mountain Bike magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.








Dealer Tour: Austin retailers seek niches in increasingly saturated market

AUSTIN, TX (BRAIN) — Take away the perpetually sunny skies, year-round mild temps and the ever-present Southern hospitality, and it might be easy to mistake Austin for Portland, Oregon. Striking similarities between the two cities include: a booming population of under a million, hip food trucks and new restaurants emerging on nearly every corner, a vibrant cycling culture that spans all disciplines, a large green space accessible from town, numerous bridges that connect the downtown with other parts of the city, a growing cycling infrastructure, a vibe that makes you want to stay awhile–and above all, the two cities are siblings in weirdness, with Portland having adopted and adapted the ‘Keep Austin Weird’ slogan for its own use. And the parallels don’t end there.

Ray Keener: What’s a trail?

Editor’s note:  Ray Keener is a longtime friend of  Bicycle Retailer . Ray’s background includes stints as a bike retailer, executive director of the Bicycle Industry Organization, editor of a trade magazine, founder of Growth Cycle and now executive director of the Bicycle Product Suppliers Association. Keener created the Selling Cycling staff training program from 1997-2012, used by more than 2,000 bike shops worldwide