Zwift indoor riding program to feature Pinarello bikes

NEW YORK (BRAIN) — The Zwift indoor riding software system will feature Pinarello bikes, the companies announced this week. Zwift may add other bike brands in the future. Zwift users will be able to virtually ride Pinarello Dogma F8 road bikes or Il Bolide time trial bikes

BikeRadar Editor’s Picks – Josh Patterson

It’s a great time to be a mountain biker. The pace of innovation is dramatic, and it can be hard to keep up with the latest advances, but even if you’re not in the market for a new bike or upgrades today, many of the technologies introduced in 2014 will benefit you in the years to come —?by which time they will also (hopefully) be more affordable.

I spend most of my time working in the dirt, and as a tech editor, I selected products that raise the bar, solve a genuine need among mountain bikers, or that I found myself reaching for each time I hit the trail.

These are the top five products I tested in 2014.

Bontrager Flash Charger TLR

Bontrager's flash charger tlr pump is a must-have for mountain bikers: bontrager's flash charger tlr pump is a must-have for mountain bikers

Trek and Bontrager seem to be doing a lot of things right this year. The company introduced 27.5in versions of the popular Fuel EX, unveiled the?RE:atkiv damper technology it co-developed with the Formula One experts at Penske Racing, and rolled out the extra-wide Boost 148 axle standard.

What impressed me the most was not the bikes or the new tech, but a tool – a lowly floor pump, to be more specific.

But Bontrager’s Flash Charger TLR is not just any floor pump; it’s a human-powered air compressor that makes short work of stubborn tubeless tyres. In my opinion, this is the most innovative mountain bike product of 2014, and I firmly believe that when it comes to mountain bikes, the Flash Charger TLR resets the bar for what a floor pump should be.

Related reading: Bontrager Flash Charger TLR review

US$119 / ?TBA / ?TBA

Yeti SB5c

The yeti sb5c is an extremely capable and well-rounded trail bike: the yeti sb5c is an extremely capable and well-rounded trail bike

Yeti Cycles had a banner year in 2014. Not only did the company roll out an eye-catching new suspension system, but it also backed up its claims about the effectiveness of its new Switch Infinity platform when Jared Graves rode away with the Enduro World Series win aboard the SB6c.

Like Yeti, many companies pushed hard into the 160mm market with incredibly capable machines that put the downhill bikes a just a few years ago to shame. But as versatile as these new long-travel bikes are, they are still overkill for most riders on most types of terrain.

Enter my favourite bike of 2014, Yeti’s SB5c. Like its longer-travel big brother, the SB5c fully embraces Yeti’s long, low and slack ethos, but it does so in a package that’s more suited to the average mountain biker.

No, it’s not cheap, but it is incredibly flexible: it climbs better than some cross-country bikes and can hold its own on the descents — Yeti racer Ritchie Rude even rode it to several EWS stage victories.

Related reading: Yeti SB5c review

US$3,399 (frame only) / ?TBA / AU$ TBA

SRAM Guide RSC brake

The sram guide rsc brake is the company's best offering to date: the sram guide rsc brake is the company's best offering to date

“Plenty of power, mountains of modulation” was how I described these brakes after I first rode them. Having logged more than 1000 miles on them this year, I stand by that statement.

This is SRAM’s best brake system to date – the Guide line of brakes have shed the inconsistent performance and noise issues that plagued past Avid/SRAM brakes with dramatically increased modulation and improved ergonomics.

I’m hopeful that many of the changes incorporated into the Guide RSC will spread throughout SRAM’s brake line in 2015.

Related reading: SRAM Guide RSC review

US$199 / ?TBA / AU$ TBA

Race Face Indy knee guards

The race face indy knee pads are comfortable enough for all-day riding: the race face indy knee pads are comfortable enough for all-day riding

The Indys were one of two products I kept reaching for each time I rode away from my house to the trails (one of the perks of living in Fort Collins, Colorado).

The hype surrounding the rise of enduro has led to an effusion of ‘enduro-specific’ products and marketing drivel. But it has also led to a lot of great products suitable for weekend warriors. Soft body armour is one category of products that has seen a rapid increase in number of options and quality of products thanks to enduro racing.

The Indy offers great protection in light, slim and pedal-friendly package. I’ve never felt encumbered by them, having logged 40-mile rides in these pads without thinking twice about their presence, and I’ve tested their crashworthiness on multiple occasions.

The hallmark of any great product is that it works without having to think about it. On this score the Indy delivers.

Related reading: Race Face Indy knee guard review

US$69.99 / ?64.95 / AU$ TBA

Giro Terraduro

We're giving giro's terraduro shoe another shot — all signs point to them being outstanding trail shoes: we're giving giro's terraduro shoe another shot — all signs point to them being outstanding trail shoes

The other item I reached for each time I hit the dirt? Giro’s Terraduro. They’ve been my go-to shoes for nearly every ride that doesn’t involve Lycra and a number plate.

Yes, I gave these shoes a one star review. I had to – two pairs failed under test!

That doesn’t mean I don’t still love the Terraduro and believe that if Giro did, in fact, fix the sole delamination issues many riders experienced, that this is the best all-around mountain bike shoe.

“Trust but verify” are words tech editors like myself try to live by. I’m doing just that with these shoes. Giro claims it has fixed the problem, the 250 miles I’ve put on my latest pair of Terraduros supports the company’s claim, but I’m going to log another 250 miles on them before I update the review.

Related reading: Giro Terraduro review

US$180 / ?TBA / AU$ TBA








Heritage road brand Brancale relaunches in U.S.

Brancale's handmade leather cycling gloves sell for $180. WASHINGTON (BRAIN) — Historically an Italian road brand, Brancale has been relaunched as a U.S.-based cycling apparel company. Brancale first rose to prominence as one of the leading manufacturers of leather “hairnet” helmets worn by professional road cyclists through the early 1990s, but has been out of the U.S

Canyon Strive CF – first look – updated with video

When Canyon launched its latest enduro bike, the carbon Strive CF, on 12 June, the reveal was long awaited. All we knew about the bike was what we could guess from seeing team riders, such as Fabian Barel and Joe Barnes, riding heavily guarded prototypes that had cloth shrouds covering the suspension systems!

For the Strive CF, Canyon designed a new concept called ShapeShifter. It’s a relatively simple but effective way of adjusting geometry and suspension kinematics on the fly, switching between what Canyon calls XC and DH modes.

Having now had a chance to test ride the bike, this article was updated on 18 December to include the below video in which What Mountain Bike’s Jon Woodhouse and Tom Marvin chat about what’s surely one of 2014’s most interesting new bikes. The Strive CF will be reviewed in issue 169 of What Mountain Bike.

You’ll find all the original details about the Canyon Strive CF from the launch under the video.

Please install Adobe Flash player to view this content

The ShapeShifter is a bar-operated mini-piston, which actuates a knuckle link just below the main rocker on the frame. This moves the shock backward or forward in relation to the rocker, adjusting its spring rate, the suspension system’s travel and the geometry of the bike. The piston is nestled between frame tubes and rocker linkages, and looks like it’s well out of the way of mud, thanks to the plastic cover over the top. The piston only moves when actuated, so it shouldn’t cause too many maintenance issues, and Canyon reckons it only adds 200g to the weight of the bike.

In XC mode the Strive CF has 130mm of rear travel, which is relatively stiff compared to DH mode. Head and seat angles are, Canyon says, 1.5 degrees steeper (67.5 and 75 degrees, respectively) and the bottom bracket is around 20mm higher. This geometry makes the bike more suited to climbing, while the stiffer suspension reduces pedal bob. Canyon says that while some of the shocks offered on the bikes provide compression damping adjustment, it’s not really needed.

The shapeshifter piston is hidden below the plastic cover. the green dot denotes the bike is in xc mode:

The ShapeShifter piston is hidden below the plastic cover. The green dot denotes the bike is in XC mode

Drop the bike into DH mode and the angles slacken to 66 degrees at the head tube and 73.5 degrees at the seat tubes, the bottom bracket drops, the suspension’s compression becomes softer and the rear wheel is able to travel through 160mm. The slacker angles, lower BB and softer but longer suspension mean the bike handles better in corners and high-speed sections.

Shifting between modes is easy once you’ve got the feel for the system. To activate DH mode, you press and hold the ShapeShifter lever and shift your weight back, pushing down with your heels before releasing the lever. To shift back to XC mode you press and hold the lever, shift your weight forwards and up, and release the lever. A green dial on the rocker tells you which mode you’re in. The system has no mid-point between modes, and the pressure in the piston can be adjusted a little to accommodate riders of different weight, or whether you want the system to fall more easily into XC of DH mode.

Side by side, dh and xc modes - the knuckle link is moved by the piston to alter the suspension's kinematics:

Side by side, DH and XC modes – the knuckle link is moved by the piston to alter the suspension’s kinematics

The other interesting shift is that Canyon now has seven different frames on offer. In the UK, we’ve been calling out for longer bikes from Canyon – in What Mountain Bike magazine’s Trail Bike of the Year awards, the shortness of Canyon’s contender held it back a touch in the standings. Canyon is now offering four standard frame sizes (S, M, L, XL) and three ‘pro’ sizes (S, M, L); the only difference is that the pro models have a longer top tube. For example, the standard medium frame has an effective top tube length of 600mm, while the Pro version has a 629mm effective top tube length.

The rest of the Strive CF’s features come as no surprise, and showcase Canyon’s usual attention to detail. The tapered steerer gives way to a down tube that holds the internally routed cables. Towards the bottom of the down tube there’s a plastic down tube protector to reduce the chance of rock-strikes damaging the frame. This is removable to give better access to the internally routed cables, which is a nice touch. It’s good to see a chainsuck plate and bolt-through rear axle too, as well as the ISCG05 chainguide mount.

The Strive CF range goes on sale today, with delivery expected in early August. The information we have suggests that the range will start at €3,699 for the Strive CF 8.0 Race (with the pro geometry), which comes with a 160mm travel Rockshox Pike RCT3 fork and a Monarch Plus RC3 Debon Air shock, a SRAM X01 groupset with RaceFace Turbine cranks, SRAM Roam 40 wheels, RockShox Reverb Stealth seatpost and a mixture of RaceFace, Ergon and Renthal finishing kit.

The top-of-the-line Strive CF 9.0 SL costs €4,999 and comes with the new 170mm Fox 36 fork, a Cane Creek DBinline shock, Shimano XTR groupset, Mavic Crossmax XL wheels and a smattering of Canyon’s own carbon finishing kit.

The bike in the gallery is the Strive CF 9.0 Race with the pro geometry, and is priced at €4,299. UK pricing for all models is to be confirmed.


Get an issue of your favourite cycling magazine for just 99p

Got the Christmas shopping all done? Still need one or two bits? Why not give yourself (or someone else) a top cycling mag this festive season?

From 20?December to 1 January, you can download any single issue (including the current issue) of Mountain Biking UK, Cycling Plus, Procycling, What Mountain Bike or Urban Cyclist magazines for just 99p. Bargain!

Just click on the links below to go to our apps on Google Newsstand or Apple Newsstand, and browse away…

Cycling Plus

Roadie? try cycling plus:

Click here for Apple; and here for Google.

MBUK

Mountain biking your thing?:

Click here for Apple; and here for Google.

Procycling

Love the sport of cycling? procycling is for you:

Click here for Apple; and here for Google.

What Mountain Bike

Want a new mountain bike? look no further:

Click here for Apple; and here for Google.

Urban Cyclist

Grab a copy of urban cyclist:

Click here for Apple.








Assos North America adds sales and marketing people on the West Coast

SAN DIEGO (BRAIN) — Assos has announced new sales rep and dealer support positions across the West Coast. Aaron Brougher joins Assos North America representing the brand across Southern California. Brougher’s territory spans from San Diego to San Luis Obispo and also includes Arizona. He joins Assos North America after a tenure at Bonk Breakers as the vice president of national sales.

Fred Clements: Opportunities exist for progressive bike shops

A blog by the NBDA's executive director. Editor’s note:  This blog post was written by  Fred Clements , executive director of the  National Bicycle Dealers Association .

Kappius Components previews ultra-accurate tire pressure gauge

Fat bike riders and cyclocross racers are often fanatical about tire pressure – and for good reason, as it’s arguably the single most important determinant in how those bikes perform in their respective fields. Handheld gauges often offer better accuracy than the ones usually found on floor pumps but Kappius Components has just launched a new hyper-accurate gauge that should get the tech-heads all hot and bothered.

The simply named Digital Pressure Gauge is also simple in design with its industrial look, dedicated Presta-only head, and handy bleed valve. The draw, however, is in its slick digital gauge, which is supposedly accurate to +/- 1 percent across the full range and with an ultra-fine 0.01psi display resolution.

If that seems like overkill, consider that for a fat bike rider who usually runs about 10psi, a difference of 0.5psi – a common resolution limit for digital gauges – equates to a considerable five percent. For dedicated snow riders whose pressures can sometimes run as low as 5psi (or lower), that 0.5psi equals a doubly significant 10 percent change.

Kappius components' new digital pressure gauge offers finer resolution and better accuracy than the normal to better fine tune your tire setup:

Want more control over your tire pressure? Kappius Components offers a solution

Kappius Components’ new gauge will be offered in three versions: one for fat bikes with a 0-15psi range and 0.01psi resolution; a cyclocross/mountain bike version with a 0-30psi range and 0.01 psi resolution; and a higher-pressure cyclocross/mountain bike model with a 0-50psi range and 0.02psi resolution, all with a claimed +/- 1 percent accuracy across the range.

Be prepared to spend a pretty penny if you want that much information, though. Retail price is US$159.99. Kappius Components is currently taking pre-orders with deliveries slated to start in about two weeks.

For manufacturer and ordering information, visit http://www.kappiuscomponents.com








Kappius Components previews ultra-accurate tire pressure gauge

Fat bike riders and cyclocross racers are often fanatical about tire pressure – and for good reason, as it’s arguably the single most important determinant in how those bikes perform in their respective fields. Handheld gauges often offer better accuracy than the ones usually found on floor pumps but Kappius Components has just launched a new hyper-accurate gauge that should get the tech-heads all hot and bothered.

The simply named Digital Pressure Gauge is also simple in design with its industrial look, dedicated Presta-only head, and handy bleed valve. The draw, however, is in its slick digital gauge, which is supposedly accurate to +/- 1 percent across the full range and with an ultra-fine 0.01psi display resolution.

If that seems like overkill, consider that for a fat bike rider who usually runs about 10psi, a difference of 0.5psi – a common resolution limit for digital gauges – equates to a considerable five percent. For dedicated snow riders whose pressures can sometimes run as low as 5psi (or lower), that 0.5psi equals a doubly significant 10 percent change.

Kappius components' new digital pressure gauge offers finer resolution and better accuracy than the normal to better fine tune your tire setup:

Want more control over your tire pressure? Kappius Components offers a solution

Kappius Components’ new gauge will be offered in three versions: one for fat bikes with a 0-15psi range and 0.01psi resolution; a cyclocross/mountain bike version with a 0-30psi range and 0.01 psi resolution; and a higher-pressure cyclocross/mountain bike model with a 0-50psi range and 0.02psi resolution, all with a claimed +/- 1 percent accuracy across the range.

Be prepared to spend a pretty penny if you want that much information, though. Retail price is US$159.99. Kappius Components is currently taking pre-orders with deliveries slated to start in about two weeks.

For manufacturer and ordering information, visit http://www.kappiuscomponents.com








Marshman steps down as LEVA executive director

FORT MYERS, Fla. (BRAIN) — After three years with the Light Electric Vehicle Association, including the past year as executive director, Heather Marshman announced she is resigning effective Friday