Wisconsin declares September 25 as Chris Kegel Day

MILWAUKEE (BRAIN) — In recognition of his contributions to his native state, the governor of Wisconsin is proclaiming Sunday, Sept.

By Emma on September 23, 2016 | Electric Bike
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6 bikes to look out for from Cube’s 2017 range

Cube is an absolute monster. Not in a bad way, but in a big way. While the likes of Specialized and Trek are the bicycle behemoths you come across daily here in the UK, over the channel Cube is a force to be reckoned with. With an ever expanding range (there are over 100 e-bikes, for starters!), there’s plenty to look out for in 2017. Here’s a run-down of some of the most interesting mountain bikes Cube has to offer next year.

  • Best mountain bike: how to choose the right one for you
  • Best women’s mountain bike: how to choose the right bike for you

Reaction Hybrid HPA SL 500

If you keep up to date with XC bikes, you’ll have come across the Cube Reaction in various alloy and carbon guises, filling a wide range of price points. Love ‘em or hate ‘em, e-bikes are a big thing, especially with our continental cousins, so it’s no surprise that Cube is keen to show off the latest model.

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While most e-bike systems either look pretty clunky or are so integrated into the frame that they become hard to access and service, Cube’s new ‘monocoque gravity casing’ manages to offer smoother, better integrated lines with plenty of access still available.

The battery is sunk into the downtube and only 20 percent of the system is outwardly visible — but it remains easily accessible, and you can actually charge the battery while it’s still located in the bike. Cube has its own casing for the motor too, which remains a Bosch Performance CX 500Wh version which has a better integrated skid plate.

Stereo Hybrid 140 HPA SL 500 27.5+

The (normal) Stereo comes in 120, 140, 150 and 160 models, with a couple of carbon options too

Sting WLS 140 SL 27.5

Stereo 160 HPA Race 27.5

Two15 HPA SL 27.5

AMS 100 C:68 SLT 29

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

Kona goes after the trail market in a big way

Kona is one of the most iconic mountain bike brands in the world, with its history stretching back decades. Over the years it has created legendary bikes, such as the Stinky DH bikes, and while Kona still has a strong gravity line-up, it’s also pretty handy when it comes to trail and XC bikes.

  • Kona Honzo AL review
  • Best mountain bike: how to choose the right one for you

We spent a bit of time out in Austria this summer looking at Kona’s new trail bikes and reckon these are the five most important in its lineup.

Hey hey, HeiHei

The HeiHei line has recently been Kona’s XC platform, with the 100mm format being designed to shred XC race courses at the highest level. For 2017 we’re now seeing the previous alloy frames being joined by carbon models, while Kona has also popped longer forks and droppers on some models too — to give them a more trail orientation. As such there are now nine HeiHei models, covering everything from World Cup XC to trail centre fun.

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HeiHei Supreme 29

  • Price: £7,899 / US$7,999 / AU$TBC

At the top of the HeiHei tree is the Supreme model, which comes in both trail friendly and WC ready formats. They both share the same carbon frame, which uses Kona’s Fuse Independent Suspension system – this gives the carbon rear triangle a little bit of flex, negating the need for a pivot by the dropouts and save weight. Kona claims that the frames weigh 1,800g, which is pretty competitive.

Kona clearly hasn’t forgotten its roots, as the bikes both have decent geometry for a race-focussed bike

Both the trail and XC versions are controlled by the RockShox Monarch XX shock, which comes with a hydraulic lockout called the Xlock Full Sprint. This also actuates the lockout on the RockShox RS1 fork. While both frames have 100mm of travel, the XC ‘Race’ version has 100mm travel up front while the trail based version has 120mm. Trail riders will be happy to see the KS Lev Integra dropper on the non-Race version too.

HeiHei Trail DL

  • Price: £5,999 / US$5,999 / AU$TBC

Happy Honzo

Honzo CR Trail

  • Price: £3499 / US$3,499 / AU$TBC

Big Honzo DL

  • Price: £2199 / US$2,399 / AU$TBC

Wo + Honzo = Wozo

  • Price: £2,099 / US$2,399 / AU$TBC

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

When a Public Space Doesn’t Want You – Kvæsthusmolen

The Bicycle Chef on Kvæsthus Pier
A late-summer evening in Copenhagen. Copenhagenize Design Company arranged for The Bicycle Chef – Cykelkokken to serve up a delicious snack for our guests from the City of Bordeaux, including Mayors from surrounding municipalities, who were visiting our city to learn about bicycle urbanism and public space.

Ole Kassow from Cycling Without Age was invited to spread his good word about his amazing project. Being urban designers, we thought it highly appropriate to exploit the potential of Copenhagen’s newest public space – Kvæsthusmolen?- a redevelopment of a quay in the heart of the Danish capital.

Summer is lingering this year, but the space was rather empty at 18:30, with only a few people enjoying the evening. We arranged for the Bicycle Chef to meet us at the “Kissing Steps” and set up for serving our guests from his converted Bullitt cargo bike.

It was going to be a classic Copenhagen arrangement. Or so we thought.

In all the material about the new, public urban space, grand descriptions are employed. “A space for cosy and quiet moments“, they tell us. “A good urban space also invites people to linger“. Indeed. The spot we chose – the Kissing Steps – is “a perfect place to share a moment in the sun.” Not a dry eye in the house.

There is nothing in those descriptions to indicate that using the space would result in an angry employee from the Scandic Front hotel nearby storming out to us in the middle of the urban space and informing us in no uncertain terms – read: rude – that we had to move. That the space upon which we stood was private property and that we had to leave it immediately.

When we questioned this bizarre statement with comments about public space, we were informed by this man that it WASN’T public space – it was owned by The Royal Danish Theatre?- also located nearby – and that the Scandic Front hotel pays “a lot of money” to rent it. Therefore we, as Copenhageners with international guests, were not allowed to have a private picnic.


Damn. There we were. Ready to experience a place for everything, a place for excitement and a place for US.

We were ready for a vibrant urban space and nine steps for kissing! As RealDania, the philanthropic fund who financed it says on the project website, the goal with the space was:

• creating an urban space which communicates the transition between Frederiksstaden and Holmen through a wide architectural “embrace” that extends the classical understanding of space in Frederiksstaden, staged through a sensual mixture of materials and a “fairy-tale” composition of lighting, which in itself makes the square enticing; both day and night?
• to soften the transition between land and sea, e.g. with a stairway, and to enable a broad spectrum of recreational activities on and by the water?

RealDania’s declared mission is “To improve quality of life for the common good through the built environment“.

What an amazing array of glossy, marketing texts about this new destination.

We were the only people in the space at that moment. The outdoor seating for the hotel was packed up for the evening – and probably the rest of the year. While Angry Hotel Man didn’t seem very certain about his claims, we had distinguished guests arriving so we chose to avoid educating him in public space and, instead, roll over to the other area on Kvæsthusmolen, along the harbour, to begin our evening.

The Lulu and Cykelkokken Ole Kassow
The World’s Youngest Urbanist, The Lulu, helped Morten out preparing for our guests. Ole Kassow did his magic and all went well.


Kvæsthusmolen was designed by Danish architects Lundberg & Tranberg.

The question remains. Can you boldy proclaim “public space” and then try to kick people off of it? And in a city that prides itself on public space like few others? The lines between private and public are blurred here on Kvæsthusmolen. The Royal Danish Theatre even tries to brand the space as Ofelia Plads / Ofelia Square, complete with a website. Even though the official name is Kvæsthusmolen.


Screengrab from The Royal Danish Theatre’s website. Just because it’s weird.

As Mayor Morten Kabell has said, “There is nothing called Ofelia Plads – except in the imagination of The Royal Theatre“.

Addendum
Mayor Morten Kabell, on Facebook, has looked into this. He writes:

The stairs and Kvæsthusmolen is owned by the Ministry of Culture and administered by ofeliaplads.dk. They have leased a part of the place to Scandic Hotel for restaurant purposes, but far from it all. On the hotel’s area you cannot make a private event or picnic.

But at the rest of Kvæsthusmolen, you can sit and enjoy yourselves, have a picnic and so on. When it amounts to a bigger event, you have to apply for permission from ofeliaplads.dk just like you’d have to if the area was owned by the city.


We weren’t in the (closed) cafe space near the hotel. We were in the middle of the area. It would be interesting to see a plan showing the exact lease area. The whole area was deserted. You would think that creating some life in the space would be regarded as beneficial to everyone, including the businesses.

But hey. So maybe it’s a free-for-all in this new urban space. Organisations can make up names for it. Hotels can kick you out of it – and, what’s worse, hotels that only have a dismal 3.5 rating on Trip Advisor.

This may be routine in other cities in the world. This is not, however, fitting in the Copenhagen in which I choose to live and work.

Copenhagenize the planet. And have a lovely day.

How to set up the suspension on your mountain bike

Any good suspension product will have a range of adjustments to tune how the fork feels and performs. Getting these settings correct is essential to maintaining your suspension’s performance and ensuring you have the most comfortable and controlled ride possible.

  • 6 top suspension maintenance tips
  • 5 bike handling problems caused by bad suspension set-up (and how to fix them)

Suspension Controls

There are three main controls you’ll see on suspension: preload, rebound, and compression. Compression controls are also often split into low-speed and high-speed compression on high-end forks.

Preload

Preload adjustment alters the resistance the fork or shock gives against your weight. So the heavier you are, the more preload you’ll need. For a fork or shock with a coil spring, this would equate to having a stiffer spring, but for an air sprung shock it’s simply a case of pumping in more pressure.  

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Compression damping

Compression damping comes from the internals of the fork and works by regulating the flow of oil through small holes. Compression damping only affects suspension when it is compressing – it doesn’t affect the preload but can appear to have a similar effect.

The more compression damping you dial in, the slower the fork or shock will move through its travel – this is good if you want a bike to pedal without bobbing for instance, but the negative effect will be the limitation of the suspension’s movement when you hit a bump, making it feel a bit like it’s locked out. In fact, lockout is simply an extremely high amount of compression damping.

Rebound damping

Rebound damping is a similar internal system to compression and only affects the suspension when it is returning to its natural position after an impact.

CTD/lockout

How to adjust a suspension fork

You will need:

  • Shock pump
  • Ruler
  • Full set of riding gear

Step 1: Set preload sag

Step 2: Compression and rebound

Preload

Compression damping

Rebound damping

Lockout/CTD

How to set up rear suspension

1. Set preload

2. Set compression and rebound damping

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

How to set up the suspension on your mountain bike

Any good suspension product will have a range of adjustments to tune how the fork feels and performs. Getting these settings correct is essential to maintaining your suspension’s performance and ensuring you have the most comfortable and controlled ride possible.

  • 6 top suspension maintenance tips
  • 5 bike handling problems caused by bad suspension set-up (and how to fix them)

Suspension Controls

There are three main controls you’ll see on suspension: preload, rebound, and compression. Compression controls are also often split into low-speed and high-speed compression on high-end forks.

Preload

Preload adjustment alters the resistance the fork or shock gives against your weight. So the heavier you are, the more preload you’ll need. For a fork or shock with a coil spring, this would equate to having a stiffer spring, but for an air sprung shock it’s simply a case of pumping in more pressure.  

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Compression damping

Compression damping comes from the internals of the fork and works by regulating the flow of oil through small holes. Compression damping only affects suspension when it is compressing – it doesn’t affect the preload but can appear to have a similar effect.

The more compression damping you dial in, the slower the fork or shock will move through its travel – this is good if you want a bike to pedal without bobbing for instance, but the negative effect will be the limitation of the suspension’s movement when you hit a bump, making it feel a bit like it’s locked out. In fact, lockout is simply an extremely high amount of compression damping.

Rebound damping

Rebound damping is a similar internal system to compression and only affects the suspension when it is returning to its natural position after an impact.

CTD/lockout

How to adjust a suspension fork

You will need:

  • Shock pump
  • Ruler
  • Full set of riding gear

Step 1: Set preload sag

Step 2: Compression and rebound

Preload

Compression damping

Rebound damping

Lockout/CTD

How to set up rear suspension

1. Set preload

2. Set compression and rebound damping

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

E-bikes: Can’t put these babies in the corner anymore

 LAS VEGAS (BRAIN) — You don’t have to wander deep into the bowels of the Mandalay Bay to find electric bikes anymore. Several brands are “mainstreaming” e-bikes at their booths this year, as they quietly add electrified models to their 2017 lineups. Advanced Sports International (Booth 7141), for example, is launching a 27.5-plus hardtail and a city trekking bike under its Fuji brand, and two versions of its Breezer Greenway e-city bike in the U.S

E-bikes: Can’t put these babies in the corner anymore

 LAS VEGAS (BRAIN) — You don’t have to wander deep into the bowels of the Mandalay Bay to find electric bikes anymore. Several brands are “mainstreaming” e-bikes at their booths this year, as they quietly add electrified models to their 2017 lineups.

Star power returns to awards night; Flagg awarded new lifetime honor

Boulder Cycle Sport named 2016 Retailer of the Year LAS VEGAS (BRAIN) — It was a star-studded night Thursday as the Interbike Awards ceremony included a reunion of cast members of the 1985 cycling film “American Flyers.” The movie, which focuses on the lives of two brothers who race bicycles and travel across the U.S. to participate in the annual “Hell of the West” stage race in Colorado, was screened on Wednesday night. Actors were joined by racing and industry notables onstage to present 33 awards for the best in retail and supply, product, athletes, advocacy, events and industry leadership

Star power returns to awards night; Flagg awarded new lifetime honor

Boulder Cycle Sport named 2016 Retailer of the Year LAS VEGAS (BRAIN) — It was a star-studded night Thursday as the Interbike Awards ceremony included a reunion of cast members of the 1985 cycling film “American Flyers.” The movie, which focuses on the lives of two brothers who race bicycles and travel across the U.S. to participate in the annual “Hell of the West” stage race in Colorado, was screened on Wednesday night. Actors were joined by racing and industry notables onstage to present 33 awards for the best in retail and supply, product, athletes, advocacy, events and industry leadership.